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Norwegian local elections, 2011

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Norwegian local elections, 2011

This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Norway
Constitution

Nationwide local elections for seats in municipality and county councils were held throughout Norway on 12 September 2011.[1] Several municipalities also opened the polling booths on 11 September.[1] For most polling stations this meant that two elections, the municipal elections and the county elections ran concurrently. In addition, an advisory referendum was held in Aust-Agder to determine whether to merge the county with Vest-Agder.

Overall, the Conservative Party made the greatest gains, and the Labour Party also advanced and remained the largest party. On the other hand, the Progress Party and the Socialist Left Party suffered severe setbacks.[2]

New features

Electronic voting

Electronic voting over the internet was tried out in certain areas for the first time in Norway, with the ultimate goal of implementing full general availability for internet voting for the 2017 parliamentary elections.[3]

Voting age of 16

In 2008, Magnhild Meltveit Kleppa, the Minister of Local Government and Regional Development announced that she was considering lowering the voting age from 18 to 16 in some municipalities as a trial. Three municipalities had applied for this in the 2007 election, but were turned down.[4]

Parliament decided to give adolescents of age 16 and 17 the right to vote in selected municipalities. Of 143 applicants, 20 municipalities plus Longyearbyen on Svalbard were selected for the trial. The municipalities taking part in the trial are:[5]

  1. Marker in Østfold
  2. Lørenskog in Akershus
  3. Hamar in Hedmark
  4. Vågå in Oppland
  5. Sigdal in Buskerud
  6. Re in Vestfold
  7. Porsgrunn in Telemark
  8. Grimstad in Aust-Agder
  9. Mandal in Vest-Agder
  10. Gjesdal and Stavanger in Rogaland
  11. Austevoll in Hordaland
  12. Luster in Sogn og Fjordane
  13. Ålesund in Møre og Romsdal
  14. Osen in Sør-Trøndelag
  15. Namdalseid in Nord-Trøndelag
  16. Tysfjord in Nordland
  17. Gáivuotna – Kåfjord in Troms
  18. Hammerfest and Kautokeino in Finnmark.

Election campaign

The issue of how and when the campaign would be conducted was affected by the 2011 Norway attacks on 22 July, which killed 77 people, most of them young supporters of the national Labour Party. On 24 July, the prime minister, the president of the Storting, and the parliamentary leaders of the political parties met for the first time to discuss rules for the political debates which would take place. Liv Signe Navarsete predicted that the election campaign would be considerably muted.[6] On 25 July, the parliamentary leaders of the political parties agreed to delay the start of the campaign until mid-August and to cancel the school debates, because of the 22 July attacks. The school elections were, however, not cancelled.[7]

Issues

One of the bigger issues for the local elections was a controversy about local hospitals in Møre og Romsdal, involving the cities Molde and Kristiansund which has hospitals today.[8] The current Red-Green government postponed the planned building of a new hospital in Molde, instead considering moving vital functions to it from Kristiansund, the local population in Molde saw the postponement as a broken promise, while the locals in Kristiansund wanted a common hospital instead due to the latter issue.[8] In early 2011, the Labour Party saw a shock opinion poll in Romsdal (which includes the city Molde) of a mere 5.8% support, which fell further in April to 1%.[8] The handling of the controversy by the party, and particularly its Minister of Health and Care Services, Anne-Grete Strøm-Erichsen, was seen as the reason for the fall.[8]

Polling

Polling Firm Date Source Labour Party Conservative Party Progress Party Centre Party Christian Democratic Party Socialist Left Party Liberal Party Others
Last Election 2007-09 [1] 29.6% 19.3% 17.5% 8.0% 6.4% 6.2% 5.9% 7.1%
TNS Gallup 2010-01 [2] 31.9% 25.0% 17.5% 6.4% 4.9% 6.1% 3.6% 4.6%
TNS Gallup 2010-07 [3] 25.9% 27.1% 20.0% 6.1% 4.5% 5.8% 4.9% 5.7%
Norfakta 2010-09 [4] 27.5% 27.4% 18.5% 5.8% 5.2% 5.3% 5.6% 4.7%
Norfakta 2011-01 [5] 22.5% 30.1% 17.5% 5.4% 4.9% 6.7% 6.3% 6.6%
TNS Gallup 2011-02 [6] 28.7% 27.4% 16.0% 7.7% 4.6% 5.3% 5.4% 2.7%
Response 2011-02 [7] 26.8% 25.4% 19.4% 7.0% 6.8% 5.4% 5.1% 4.1%
TNS Gallup 2011-03 [8] 26.8% 29.3% 16.1% 7.6% 5.1% 5.6% 5.6% 3.9%
Response 2011-03 [9] 28.4% 28.7% 17.0% 6.8% 4.7% 5.7% 5.4% 3.3%
Sentio 2011-03 [10] 28.9% 23.7% 17.7% 6.9% 6.1% 4.2% 6.0% 6.5%
TNS Gallup 2011-04 [11] 28.9% 27.0% 15.3% 6.4% 4.9% 6.5% 5.6% 5.4%
InFact 2011-04 [12] 28.5% 23.5% 18.9% 6.8% 5.0% 5.5% 5.8% 5.9%
Norstat 2011-05 [13] 30.6% 28.9% 13.6% 6.4% 4.6% 4.7% 5.5% 5.6%
TNS Gallup 2011-05 [14] 27.3% 28.1% 15.2% 6.6% 5.0% 6.5% 5.2% 6.0%
TNS Gallup 2011-06 [15] 27.0% 31.0% 13.2% 5.3% 6.9% 6.5% 4.9% 5.1%
InFact 2011-06 [16] 29.0% 26.8% 20.6% 5.1% 5.0% 6.0% 3.7% 3.8%
InFact 2011-07 [17] 24.9% 27.0% 16.9% 7.5% 5.7% 5.2% 6.1% 6.7%
TNS Gallup1 2011-07 [18] 35.4% 23.3% 13.6% 6.2% 4.7% 6.0% 5.9% 4.9%
Norstat 2011-08 [19] 34.2% 25.2% 16.0% 5.6% 4.5% 3.6% 5.0% 6.0%
TNS Gallup 2011-08 [20] 33.8% 24.9% 12.7% 4.9% 6.0% 6.8% 6.2% 4.7%
InFact 2011-08 [21] 31.6% 24.5% 17.5% 5.8% 5.1% 4.7% 5.5% 5.2%
Synovate 2011-08 [22] 34.0% 26.0% 16.0% 4.9% 6.1% 4.7% 3.9% 4.5%
InFact 2011-08 [23] 32.4% 25.0% 12.9% 5.7% 7.2% 6.3% 5.3% 5.2%
TNS Gallup 2011-08 [24] 30.9% 25.0% 14.0% 6.5% 6.5% 4.0% 6.3% 6.8%
TNS Gallup 2011-09 [25] 31.3% 27.3% 12.8% 5.9% 6.0% 4.5% 6.9% 4.5%
Synovate 2011-09 [26] 31.0% 25.1% 15.3% 6.2% 7.0% 4.4% 6.1% 4.9%
TNS Gallup 2011-09 [27] 31.9% 27.9% 12.8% 6.0% 6.5% 4.1% 6.7% 4.1%
Response 2011-09 [28] 32.1% 25.9% 16.3% 5.6% 5.9% 3.7% 5.5% 5.0%
TNS Gallup 2011-09 [29] 34.3% 27.1% 11.3% 5.2% 6.2% 3.6% 5.7% 6.6%
TNS Gallup 2011-09 [30] 33.3% 26.2% 12.3% 5.4% 5.6% 4.2% 6.2% 6.8%

1This was the first poll since the attacks in Norway.

Results

Municipal elections

County elections

References

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  8. ^ a b c d
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