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Denotation

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Title: Denotation  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Connotation, Sense and reference, Doxastic logic, Frege–Church ontology, Lexicology
Collection: Lexicology, Meaning (Philosophy of Language), Philosophy of Language
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Denotation

Denotation is a translation of a sign to its meaning, precisely to its literal meaning, more or less like dictionaries try to define it. Denotation is sometimes contrasted to connotation, which translates a sign to meanings associated with it.

Contents

  • In semiotics 1
  • In other fields 2
  • Examples 3
  • External links 4

In semiotics

In logic, linguistics and semiotics, the denotation of a word or phrase is a part of its meaning; however, the part referred to varies by context:

In other fields

  • In Computer science, denotational semantics is contrasted with operational semantics.
  • In media-studies terminology, denotation is an example of the first level of analysis: what the audience can visually see on a page. Denotation often refers to something literal, and avoids being a metaphor. Here it is usually coupled with connotation which is the second level of analysis, being what the denotation represents.

Examples

Example one.

The denotation of this example is a red rose with a green stem. The connotation is that it is a symbol of passion and love – this is what the rose represents.

Example two.

The denotation is a brown cross. The connotation is a symbol of religion, according to the media connotation. However, to be more specific this is a symbol of Christianity.

Example seven .

The denotation is a representation of a cartoon heart. The connotation is a symbol of love and affection.

External links

  • Semiotics for Beginners
  • VirtuaLit Elements of Poetry
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