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Cheti Chand

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Cheti Chand

Cheti Chand
Cheti Chand banner in Pune, India
Observed by Sindhi people
Type Sindhi New Year's Day
Celebrations 2 day
Date March/April
2014 date 1 April
Murti of Ishta Dev of Sindhi people Jhule lal

Cheti Chand (Sindhi: چيٽي چنڊ) is an important festival celebrated as New Year's Day by Sindhi people of India and Pakistan. It is also celebrated by the Sindhi diaspora around the world. According to the Hindu calendar, it is the second day of the month chaitra (i.e. a day after Ugadi and Gudi Padwa), known as Chet in the Sindhi language. Hence it is known as Chet-i-Chand.

The Sindhi community celebrates the festival of Cheti Chand in honour of the birth of Ishtadeva Uderolal, popularly known as Jhulelal, the patron saint of the Sindhis. This day is considered to be very auspicious and is celebrated with pomp and gaiety. On this day, people worship water – the elixir of life.

Followers of Jhulelal observe Chaliho Sahab. It suggests that for forty long days and nights they underwent rituals and vigil on the bank of Sindhu. They did not shave, nor did they wear new clothes or shoes. They did not use soap or oil or any opulent thing. They just washed their clothes, dried them and wore them again. In the evening, they worshiped God Varun (Vedic deity of water and cosmic order), sang songs in his praise and prayed for solace and salvation. After 40 days of Chaaliho, the followers of Jhulelal celebrate the occasion with festivity as 'Thanks Giving Day' even till today.

On this day, many Sindhis take Baharana Sahib to a nearby river or lake. Baharana Sahib consists of Jyot (Oil Lamp), Misiri (Crystal Sugar), Phota (Cardamom), Fal (Fruits), and Akha. Behind is Kalash (Water jar) and a Nariyal (Coconut) in it, covered with cloth, phool (flowers) and patta (leaves). There is also a Murti (statue) of Pujya Jhulelal Devta (Pujya=Worthy of worship, Devta=Deity).

External links

  • Images of Cheti Chand in Sindhunagar from Sindhunagar.com
  • Bawarchi, Indian Food Recipes from sify.com
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