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Society for Biodemography and Social Biology

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Society for Biodemography and Social Biology

The Society for Biodemography and Social Biology
Formation 1922
Location
President
Hans-Peter Kohler
Website http://www.biodemog.org
Formerly called
The Society for the Study of Social Biology;[1] The American Eugenics Society[2]

The Society for Biodemography and Social Biology, formerly known as the Society for the Study of Social Biology and the American Eugenics Society,[1] is dedicated to "furthering the discussion, advancement, and dissemination of knowledge about biological and sociocultural forces which affect the structure and composition of human populations."[3]

Contents

  • History 1
  • List of presidents 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

History

The Society formed after the success of the Second International Conference on Eugenics (

  • The Society for Biodemography and Social Biology
  • Biodemography and Social Biology The academic journal.

External links

  1. ^ a b c Eugenics, Encyclopedia of Critical Psychology, (2014, pp 619-626)http://link.springer.com/referenceworkentry/10.1007%2F978-1-4614-5583-7_99
  2. ^ a b c American Eugenics Society, Controlling Heredity,https://library.missouri.edu/exhibits/eugenics/aes.htm
  3. ^ The Society for Biodemography and Social Biology, Homepage (Last retrieved Nov 26, 2014)http://www.biodemog.org
  4. ^ Messall, Rebecca (Fall 2004). "The Long Road of Eugenics: From Rockefeller to Roe v. Wade". The Human Life Review 30 (4): 33–74, 67.  
  5. ^ American Eugenics Society, Inc. (1931). Organized eugenics: January 1931. pp. 3, 65. 

References

See also

List of presidents

[1] The name was most recently changed to Society for Biodemography and Social Biology.[5][4] Osborn said, “The name was changed because it became evident that changes of a eugenic nature would be made for reasons other than eugenics, and that tying a eugenic label on them would more often hinder than help their adoption. Birth control and abortion are turning out to be great eugenic advances of our time." [2]

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