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Universal Order

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Universal Order

James Nolan Mason (born 25 July 1952[1]) is an American National Socialist and Satanist.

American National Socialist

Mason grew up in Chillicothe, Ohio. When he was 14 years old he began communicating with George Lincoln Rockwell's American Nazi Party and became a youth member until his 18th birthday when he was sworn into the renamed National Socialist White People's Party. In the 1970s he was involved with the National Socialist Liberation Front. He later went on to form the Universal Order.

He edited, wrote, and published a newsletter titled SIEGE throughout the early to mid-1980s. Its contents were edited and published by Michael Moynihan as Siege: The Collected Writings of James Mason. He advocated leaderless resistance, calling for autonomous action by individuals rather than an authoritarian hierarchical organization.[2]

Universal Order

Universal Order is the name of a National Socialist "operational front" founded by James Mason. Growing out of the National Socialist Liberation Front, Mason founded the order in the early 1980s following the advice of Charles Manson, leader of the mass-murder cult "The Family". Not only did Manson suggest the name, but he also designed the logo used by the group, a swastika superimposed over the scales of justice.[3]

As its Leaders it recognized a lineage of Adolf Hitler, George Lincoln Rockwell, Joseph Tommasi, and Charles Manson. It later focused on presenting a National Socialist perspective on the paranormal.

Universal Order is not an actual organization (in the sense of having official members and a headquarters), "but a philosophical concept or a state of mind". Mason and collaborators "found it necessary and desirable to give our certain line of thought a distinguishing title so as to at least attempt [to] separate it from the more conservative takes on National Socialism." [4]

Notes

References

External links

  • online audio edition
  • , issue 18
  • The Universal Order File Archive
  • online ebook.

See also

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