World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Transcription factor II H

Article Id: WHEBN0009895073
Reproduction Date:

Title: Transcription factor II H  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: GTF2H4, Transcription preinitiation complex, GTF2H1, Transcription factor II E, Transcription factor II B
Collection: Gene Expression, Transcription Factors
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Transcription factor II H

general transcription factor IIH, polypeptide 1, 62kDa
Identifiers
Symbol GTF2H1
Alt. symbols BTF2
Entrez 2965
HUGO 4655
OMIM 189972
RefSeq NM_005316
UniProt P32780
Other data
Locus Chr. 11 p15.1-p14
general transcription factor IIH, polypeptide 2, 44kDa
Identifiers
Symbol GTF2H2
Alt. symbols BTF2, TFIIH, BTF2P44, T-BTF2P44
Entrez 2966
HUGO 4656
OMIM 601748
RefSeq NM_001515
UniProt Q13888
Other data
Locus Chr. 5 q12.2-13.3
general transcription factor IIH, polypeptide 3, 34kDa
Identifiers
Symbol GTF2H3
Alt. symbols BTF2, TFIIH
Entrez 2967
HUGO 4657
OMIM 601750
RefSeq NM_001516
UniProt Q13889
Other data
Locus Chr. 12 q24.31

Transcription factor II Human (TFIIH) is one of several general transcription factors that make up the RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex.[1] TFIIH consists of ten subunits, 7 of which (XPD, XPB, p62, p52, p44, p34 and TTDA) form the core complex. The cyclin activating kinase-subcomplex (CDK7, MAT1, and cyclin H) is linked to the core via the XPD protein [2] Two of the subunits, ERCC2/XPD and ERCC3/XPB, have helicase and ATPase activities and help create the transcription bubble. In a test tube these subunits are only required for transcription if the DNA template is not already denatured or if it is supercoiled.

Two other TFIIH subunits, CDK7 and cyclin H, phosphorylate serine amino acids on the RNA polymerase II C-terminal domain and possibly other proteins involved in the cell cycle. Next to a vital function in transcription initiation, TFIIH is also involved in nucleotide excision repair.

It is responsible for giving the 'go' signal which is why it is assembled last.

References

  1. ^ Kim TK,  
  2. ^ Lee TI, Young RA (2000). "Transcription of eukaryotic protein-coding genes". Annu. Rev. Genet. 34: 77–137.  

External links


This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.