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Tomato jam

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Tomato jam

Melba toast topped with goat cheese and tomato jam

Tomato jam (also referred to as tomato jelly)[1] is a type of fruit preserve prepared with tomatoes and sugar.[2] Green tomatoes are used in some preparations.[1][3] Some preparations may use honey,[4] and some include bacon.[5] It has been described as "a cross between marmalade and ketchup".[6] Some commercially prepared varieties are produced. It is sometimes used in the preparation of sandwiches similar to a BLT, using the jam in place of tomato.[7]

Tomato jam has been reported as being a popular condiment in South Africa.[8]

Contents

  • History 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • Further reading 4

History

In 1840 in the United States, a recipe was published in the American Farmer that involved straining stewed tomatoes through cloth, adding an equal amount of sugar, and then boiling the mixture for a few hours.[1]

In 1843 in the U.S., a recipe for preparing tomato jam was published in the Boston Cultivator.[1] The preparation process included rubbing stewed tomatoes through a sieve, adding an equal amount of sugar, and then stewing the mixture into a jam.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e Smith, A.F. (1994). The Tomato in America: Early History, Culture, and Cookery. University of Illinois Press. pp. 84–85.  
  2. ^ Saffery, D. (2007). The Ghana Cookery Book. Jeppestown Press.  
  3. ^ The South African Farmer's Advocate and Home Magazine (v. 28). 1931. 
  4. ^ McCarthy, L. (2012). Jam On: The Craft of Canning Fruit. Penguin Publishing Group. p. 141.  
  5. ^ "Recipe: Bacon and Tomato Jam". San Jose Mercury News. August 18, 2014. Retrieved March 1, 2015. 
  6. ^ Walker, Judy (June 16, 2011). "Creole Tomato Jam". NOLA.com. Retrieved March 1, 2015. 
  7. ^ Rothkopf, Joanna (October 9, 2010). "Cutty’s bacon, lettuce and tomato jam sandwich recipe". Salon.com. Retrieved March 1, 2015. 
  8. ^ Slooten, Sue Van (October 26, 2011). "Tomato Jam". Mother Earth News. Retrieved March 1, 2015. 

Further reading

  • Country Life Illustrated (v. 5). Hudson & Kearns. 1899. p. 731. 
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