Tirtagangga

Tirtagangga

Tirtagangga water garden
Tirtagangga
Tirtagangga
Location in Bali
Tirtagangga
Tirtagangga
Location in Indonesia

Coordinates: 8°24′43″S 115°35′13″E / 8.41194°S 115.58694°E / -8.41194; 115.58694Coordinates: 8°24′43″S 115°35′13″E / 8.41194°S 115.58694°E / -8.41194; 115.58694

Country Indonesia
Province Bali

Tirta Gangga is a village and palace in eastern Bali, Indonesia, about 5 kilometres from Karangasem, near Abang. It is noted for its water palace, owned by Karangasem royalty.

History

Tirta Gangga literally means water from the Ganges and it is a site of some reverence for the Hindu Balinese. Strictly, the name refers to the water palace built here in 1948 by the Raja of Karangasem, Anak Agung Agung Anglurah Ketut Karangasem. It is, however, widely used to refer to the general area which includes the water palace and the lush rural areas around.


The primary draw in this area for visitors is the Tirta Gangga water palace, a maze of pools and fountains surrounded by a lush garden and stone carvings and statues. The one hectare complex was built in 1946 by the late King of Karangsem but was destroyed almost entirely by the eruption of nearby Mount Agung in 1963.[1] It has been lovingly re-built and restored and has an air of authentic royal magnificence.

The centrepiece of the palace is an eleven tiered fountain and there are many beautiful carvings and statues adorning the gardens.

The area around Tirta Gangga is noted for its rice paddy terraces. Lempuyang Temple (Pura Lempuyang Luhur) lies about 10 km east of Tirtagangga on the slopes of Mount Lempuyang and is one of the key nine directional temples on the island. Taman Ujung is also south-east of Karangasem and is another water palace built by the predecessor of the King who constructed Tirta Gangga. Taman Ujung was built in 1909 as a relaxation and recreation palace by the then King of Karangasem, I Gusti Bagus Jelantik. It was largely destroyed by the eruption of Mount Agungin 1963, damaged again by an earthquake in 1979 and has not been restored on the same scale as Tirta Gangga.

References

External links

  • Official site
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