World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Pope Boniface V

Article Id: WHEBN0000024057
Reproduction Date:

Title: Pope Boniface V  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Pope Honorius I, Pope Adeodatus I, Edwin of Northumbria, Pope Romanus, Pope Theodore II
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Pope Boniface V

Pope Saint
Boniface V
Papacy began 23 December 619
Papacy ended 25 October 625
Predecessor Adeodatus I
Successor Honorius I
Personal details
Born Naples, Byzantine Empire
Died 25 October 625(625-10-25)
Other popes named Boniface

Pope Boniface V (Latin: Bonifatius V; died 25 October 625) was Pope from 23 December 619 to his death in 625.[1] He did much for the Christianising of England and enacted the decree by which churches became places of refuge for criminals.

Boniface V was a Neapolitan who succeeded Pope Adeodatus I after a vacancy of more than a year. Before his consecration, Italy was disturbed by the rebellion of the eunuch Eleutherius, Exarch of Ravenna. The patrician pretender advanced towards Rome, but before he could reach the city, he was slain by his own troops.

The Liber Pontificalis records that Boniface made certain enactments relative to the rights of sanctuary, and that he ordered the ecclesiastical notaries to obey the laws of the empire on the subject of wills. He also prescribed that acolytes should not presume to translate the relics of martyrs and that, in the Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano, they should not take the place of deacons in administering baptism. Boniface completed and consecrated the cemetery of Saint Nicomedes on the Via Nomentana. In the Liber Pontificalis, Boniface is described as "the mildest of men", whose chief distinction was his great love for the clergy.

The Venerable Bede writes of the pope's affectionate concern for the English Church. The "letters of exhortation" which he is said to have addressed to Mellitus, Archbishop of Canterbury, and to Justus, Bishop of Rochester, are no longer extant, but certain other letters of his have been preserved. One is written to Justus after he had succeeded Mellitus as Archbishop of Canterbury in 624, conferring the pallium upon him and directing him to "ordain bishops as occasion should require." According to Bede, Pope Boniface also sent letters to King Edwin of Northumbria in 625 urging him to embrace the Christian faith, and to the Christian Princess Æthelburg of Kent, Edwin's spouse, exhorting her to use her best endeavours for the conversion of her consort (Bede, H.E., II, vii, viii, x, xi).

He was buried in St. Peter's Basilica on 25 October 625.

Notes

References

  •  
  •  
  • Bede. Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum
  • Gasquet, Francis Aidan. A Short History of the Catholic Church in England, 19
  • Gregorovius, Ferdinand. II, 113
  • Hunt, William. The English Church from Its Foundation to the Norman Conquest. Vol. 1. "A History of the English Church", W. R. W. Stephens and William Hunt, ed. London: Macmillan and Co., 1912. 49, 56, 58
  • Jaffé, Regesta Pontificum Romanorum ab condita ecclesia ad annum 1198. Berlin, 1851; 2d ed., Leipsic, 1881–88. I, 222
  • Jungmann, Dissertationes Selectae in Historiam Ecclesiasticam, II, 389.
  • Langen, 506
  • Liber Pontificalis (ed. Duchesne), I, 321–322
  • Mansi, Gian Domenico. X, 547–554
  • Mann, Horace K. Lives of the Popes I, 294–303

External links

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Adeodatus I
Pope
619–625
Succeeded by
Honorius I
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.