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Montenegrin independence referendum, 1992

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Title: Montenegrin independence referendum, 1992  
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Subject: Montenegro–Serbia relations, Montenegrin independence referendum, 2006, Politics of Montenegro, Montenegrin elections, Republic of Montenegro (1992–2006)
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Montenegrin independence referendum, 1992

This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Montenegro
Constitution

The Montenegrin independence referendum of March 1, 1992 was the first referendum regarding Montenegrin independence. 421,549 citizens were registered voters.

The question put to the electorate was, roughly translated:

Are you for Montenegro to remain a part of a united Yugoslavia, as a sovereign republic and fully equal to all other Yugoslav republics that wish to remain in unity?

The electorate overwhelmingly chose to remain within Yugoslavia, with a Yes vote of 95.96%.

Contents

  • Campaign 1
  • Blocs 2
    • Federation 2.1
      • Supporters 2.1.1
    • Independence 2.2
      • Supporters 2.2.1
  • Results 3
    • Total 3.1
    • By municipality 3.2
  • External links 4

Campaign

Prime Minister Milo Đukanović spent a lot of time campaigning amongst the people, expressing the necessity of a common Yugoslav state with Serbs. Although not generally changing the outcome, DPS-controlled state propaganda had affected greatly by pushing the Federal option and misrepresenting the independenists.

Milo Đukanović's outspoke during the campaign: We are proud of our Serb origin and Montenegrin statehood, the proud history of the Serbian people. That's why we believe in a common future and prosperity.

With the victory of the unionist bloc, he concluded: Because of eternal brotherhood links; common blood spilled in wars, because of the eternal dream of the best Montenegrins and Serbians, for a brightly common better future, Montenegro willingly chose to live in a common state with Serbia with open heart.

The Albanian national minority boycotted the election, as did the pro-sovereigntist orientated Montenegrins.

Blocs

Federation

Supporters

Independence

Supporters

Results

Total

Registered Voters: 421,549

  • Total: 278,382 (66.04%)
    • Yes votes: 266,273 (95.96%)
    • No votes: 8,755 (3.14%)
YES
  
95.96%
NO
  
3.14%

By municipality

Source: Centre for Monitoring Zvanični rezultati referenduma 1992. godine

Municipality No Yes Registered Voters Voted
Andrijevica 5 (0.11%) 4,596 (99.61%) 4,720 4,614 (97.75%)
Bar 616 (5%) 11,523 (93.61%) 25,550 12,309 (48.18%)
Berane 697 (3.99%) 16,679 (95.37%) 25,040 17,488 (69.84%)
Bijelo Polje 363 (1.65%) 21,271 (96.75%) 35,597 21,985 (61.76%)
Budva 204 (3.20%) 6,124 (95.99%) 8,696 6,380 (73.37%)
Cetinje 326 (3.41%) 9,093 (95.24%) 14,408 9547 (66.26%)
Danilovgrad 93 (1.03%) 8,092 (89.28%) 11,319 9,064 (80.08%)
Herceg Novi 486 (3.09%) 15,071 (95.79%) 21,130 15,374 (74.46%)
Kolašin 44 (0.67%) 6,455 (98.47%) 8,103 6,555 (80.90%)
Kotor 693 (5.83%) 10,937 (91.98%) 16,560 11,981 (71.81%)
Mojkovac 35 (0.52%) 6,677 (99.23%) 7,508 6,729 (89.62%)
Nikšić 775 (1.76%) 43,160 (97.83%) 52,758 44,118 (83.62%)
Plav 96 (3.37%) 2,730 (95.79%) 10,314 2,850 (27.63%)
Plužine 12 (0.36%) 3,353 (99.29%) 3,763 3,377 (89.74%)
Pljevlja 452 (2.05%) 21,543 (97.50%) 28,573 22,095 (77.33%)
Podgorica 2,746 (4.03%) 64,955 (95.21%) 103,211 68,222 (66.10%)
Rožaje 136 (8.98%) 1,360 (89.77%) 13,962 1,515 (10.85%)
Šavnik 16 (0.66%) 2,385 (98.68%) 2,731 2,417 (88.50%)
Tivat 720 (12.37%) 4,915 (84.44%) 8,737 5,821 (66.62%)
Ulcinj 215 (7.98%) 2,411 (89.50%) 15,363 2,694 (17.54%)

External links

  • The Njegoskij Fund Public Project >> Today's Montenegro >> Politics
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