World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Lick (music)

Article Id: WHEBN0000972095
Reproduction Date:

Title: Lick (music)  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Impro-Visor, Scat singing, Fill (music), Flatpicking, Les Paul
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Lick (music)

In popular music genres such as rock or jazz music, a lick is "a stock pattern or phrase" [2] consisting of a short series of notes that is used in solos and melodic lines and accompaniment. Licks in rock and roll are often used through a formula, and variations technique in which variants of simple, stock ideas are blended and developed during the solo.

In a jazz band, a lick may be performed during an improvised solo, either during an accompanied solo chorus or during an unaccompanied solo break. Jazz licks are usually original short phrases which can be altered so that they can be used over a song's changing harmonic progressions.

Similar concepts

A lick is different from the related concept of a riff in that riffs can also include repeated chord progressions. Licks are usually associated with single-note melodic lines rather than chord progressions. However, like riffs, licks can be used as the basis of an entire song. Single-line riffs or licks used as the basis of Western classical music pieces are called ostinatos. Contemporary jazz writers also use riff- or lick-like ostinatos in modal music and Latin jazz.

A lick can be a hook, if the lick meets the definition of a hook: "a musical idea, a passage or phrase, that is believed to be appealing and make the song stand out", and "catch the ear of the listener".[3] A lick may be incorporated into a fill, which is a short passage played in the pause between phrases of a melody.

For musicians, learning a lick is usually a form of imitation. Imitating style is as important as learning the appropriate scale over a given chords.[4] By imitating, musicians understand and analyze what others have done, which in turn allows them to build a vocabulary of their own.

See also

Sources

  1. ^ Sokolow, Fred (1997). Complete Country Guitar Book, p.9. ISBN 978-0-7866-2841-4.
  2. ^  
  3. ^ Covach, John. "Form in Rock Music: A Primer", in Stein, Deborah (2005). Engaging Music: Essays in Music Analysis, p.71. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-517010-5.
  4. ^ Rengel, Matias T. (2011), Licks for Everyone, Boston, p. 137,  
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.