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Fokker XB-8

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Title: Fokker XB-8  
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Language: English
Subject: Douglas Y1B-7, Keystone B-6, Fokker V.9, Fokker F.XIV, Fokker V.39
Collection: Atlantic Aircraft Aircraft, Monoplanes, Twin-Engined Tractor Aircraft, United States Bomber Aircraft 1930–1939
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Fokker XB-8

XB-8
Atlantic XB-8 prototype
Role Bomber
Manufacturer General Aviation Corporation.[1]
Designer Fokker
Primary user United States Army Air Corps
Number built 7 (1 XB-8 + 2 YB-8 + 4 Y1B-8), all as Y1O-27
Developed from Fokker O-27

The Fokker XB-8 was a bomber built for the United States Army Air Corps in the 1920s, derived from the high-speed Fokker O-27 observation aircraft.

Contents

  • Design and development 1
  • Operational history 2
  • Operators 3
  • Specifications (XB-8) 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Design and development

During assembly, the second prototype XO-27 was converted to a bomber prototype, dubbed the XB-8. While the XB-8 was much faster than existing biplane bombers, it did not have the bomb capacity to be considered for production. Two YB-8s and 4 Y1B-8s were ordered, but these were changed mid-production to Y1O-27 configuration.

The wing of the XB-8 and XO-27 was built entirely from wood, although the fuselage was constructed of steel tubes covered with fabric with the exception of the nose which had a corrugated metal.[1] They featured the first retractable landing gear ever fitted to an Army Air Corps bomber or observation craft. The undercarriage retracted electrically. Crew was three in tandem position.[1]

Operational history

It competed against a design submitted by Douglas Aircraft Company, the Y1B-7/XO-36. Both promised to greatly exceed the performance of the large biplane bombers then used by the Army Air Corps. However, the Douglas XB-7 was markedly better in performance than the XB-8, and no further versions of Fokker's aircraft were built.

Operators

 United States

Specifications (XB-8)

Data from Fokker's Twilight[2]

General characteristics
  • Crew: 4
  • Length: 47 ft 4 in (14.42 m)
  • Wingspan: 64 ft 4 in (19.60 m)
  • Height: 11 ft 6 in (3.50 m)
  • Wing area: 619 ft² (57.5 m²)
  • Empty weight: 6,861 lb (3,112 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 10,650 lb (4,824 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Curtiss V-1570-23 "Conqueror" V12 engines, 600 hp (450 kW) each

Performance

See also

Related development
Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era
Related lists

References

Notes
  1. ^ a b c Cellier, Alfred (23 August 1934), "American Military Monoplanes", Flight: 864 
  2. ^ Pelletier 2005, p. 64.
Bibliography
  • Pelletier, Alain J. "Fokker Twilight". Air Enthusiast, No. 117, May/June 2005, pp. 62–66. ISSN 0143-5450.
  • Wagner, Ray. American Combat Planes. New York: Doubleday, 1982. ISBN 0-930083-17-2.

External links

  • O-27 USAAS 1000 Aircraft Photos
  • bottom of p. 56Popular Science,ge&q=Popular%20Science%201931%20plane&f=true "Army's Mystery Plane Passes Speed Test", December 1930,
  • Atlantic (Fokker) XB-8, National Museum of the US Air Force
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