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Allium victorialis

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Allium victorialis

{| class="infobox biota" style="text-align: left; width: 200px; font-size: 100%"

|- ! colspan=2 style="text-align: center" | Alpine leek
victory onion |-


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|- |- ! colspan=2 style="text-align: center" | Scientific classification |-













































| Species: | A. victorialis |-


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|- ! colspan=2 style="text-align: center" | Binomial name |- | colspan=2 style="text-align: center" | Allium victorialis
L. Sp. Pl. 1: 295. 1753[1][2] |- style="text-align: center"

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|- ! colspan=2 style="text-align: center" | Synonyms[3] |- | colspan=2 style="text-align: left" |

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Allium victorialis, commonly known as victory onion, Alpine leek, is a broad-leaved Eurasian species of wild onion. It is a perennial of the Amaryllis family that occurs widely in mountainous regions of Europe and parts of Asia (Caucasus and Himalayas).[3][4]

Some authors consider certain East Asian and Alaskan populations as constituting subspecies platyphyllum within the species Allium victorialis.[5][6] Recent sources recognize this group as a distinct species, called Allium ochotense.[7][8][9][10][11]

General description

Allium victorialis attains a height of 30–45 cm (11.8–17.7 in) and forms a sheathed bulb ("root-stalk") about the thickness of a finger and 5–8 cm (2.0–3.1 in) long.[12] Leaves are broad elliptical or lanceolate. Flowers (perianths) are whitish green.[12]

Distribution

Allium victorialis is found widely across mountain ranges Europe, as well as the Caucasus and the Himalayas.[3]

Nomenclature

The specific epithet victorialis comes from the German Siegwurz (Root of Victory),[13] and it earned this name having been "worn as an amulet, to be as safeguard against the attacks of certain impure spirits," by Bohemian miners among others.[13]

Uses

The plant, in past centuries in certain mountainous regions of Europe, "was cultivated as a medicinal and fetish plant".[14]

See also

References

  1. ^ Flora of North America — map
  2. ^
  3. ^ a b c Allium victorialisKew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families,
  4. ^ L.Allium victorialisAltervista Flora Italiana, Aglio serpentino, victory onion, alpine leek, includes photos and European distribution map
  5. ^ Flora of North America Vol. 26 Page 234 Allium victorialis Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 295. 1753.
  6. ^ Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 1: 295. 1753.Allium victorialis ge cong 茖葱Flora of China Vol. 24 Page 172
  7. ^ Prokh.Allium ochotenseKew World Checklist of Selected Plant Families,
  8. ^ Prokh.Allium ochotenseThe Plant List,
  9. ^ Kharkevich, S.S. (ed.) (1987). Plantae Vasculares Orientalis Extremi Sovietici 2: 1-448. Nauka, Leningrad.
  10. ^ Denisov, N. (2008). Addition to Vascular flora of the Kozlov island (Peter the Great Gulf, Japanese sea). Turczaninowia 11(4): 29-42.
  11. ^ Choi, H.J. & Oh, B.U. (2011). A partial revision of Allium (Amaryllidaceae) in Korea and north-eastern China. Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society 167: 153-211.
  12. ^ a b . 1–1.5 ft (0.30–0.46 m) height; and rootstalk 5.1–7.6 cm (2–3 in).
  13. ^ a b
  14. ^

External links

  • Media related to Allium victorialis at Wikimedia Commons
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