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Rifle Corps (Soviet)

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Rifle Corps (Soviet)

A rifle corps (Russian: стрелковый корпус, strelkovyy korpus) was a Soviet corps-level military formation during the mid-twentieth century. Rifle corps were made up of a varying number of rifle divisions, although the allocation of three rifle divisions to a rifle corps was common during the latter part of World War II.

Unlike army corps formed by Germany and the Western Allies, Soviet rifle corps were composed primarily of combat troops and had only a small logistical component. Because the rifle divisions themselves were also primarily made up of combat troops, the rifle corps were numerically smaller than corps of other nations. The Soviets also formed Guards rifle corps during World War II, although these were often assigned control of regular rifle divisions and sometimes controlled no Guards rifle divisions.

The Red Army as a whole had 27 rifle corps headquarters in its order of battle on 1 June 1938; this had been expanded to 62 by June 1941.[1] When Germany invaded the Soviet Union on June 22, 1941, the Red Army initially had some 32 rifle corps headquarters as part of their order of battle in action against the Germans. Because Joseph Stalin's prewar purge of the Red Army had removed so many experienced leaders, the rifle corps echelon of command in Soviet forces engaged against the Germans dwindled in the face of massive Red Army losses of 1941. The stark shortage of experienced leaders forced the Red Army to have rifle army headquarters directly supervising rifle divisions without the assistance of intervening rifle corps headquarters.[2] The use of rifle corps headquarters never disappeared entirely from the Red Army during World War II, as rifle armies in areas not fighting the Germans (such as the Far Eastern military region) maintained their use of rifle corps headquarters during the entire war.

An example of wartime rifle corps organization is that of the 8th Estonian Rifle Corps in 1942:[3]

  • 8th Rifle Corps
    • 7th Rifle Division
    • 249th Rifle Division
    • 85th Corps Artillery Regiment
    • 36th Sapper Battalion
    • 86th Medical Battalion
    • 482nd Reconnaissance Company
    • 162nd Machine Gun Battalion

Of the 8th Rifle Corps' 1942 strength of 26,466 men, only 2,599 (less than 10 per cent) made up the corps headquarters and corps assets, the remainder being assigned to the two rifle divisions.

By November 1941, the Soviet order of battle showed only one rifle corps headquarters still active among the forces fighting the German invasion. By early 1942, however, the Soviets began to reactivate rifle corps headquarters for use as an intermediate command echelon between the rifle armies and rifle divisions. Doubtlessly, the direct command of divisions by army headquarters resulted in too-large spans of control for army commanders and the Red Army desired to reintroduce the rifle corps headquarters once enough experienced commanders and staff officers were available. By the end of 1942, 21 rifle corps headquarters were in action with Soviet forces engaging the Germans. This grew to over 100 by the end of 1943, and reached a peak of 174 either in action against the Germans or as part of the strategic reserve of the Stavka by the end of the war with Germany in May 1945.

A limited number of Rifle Corps remained as part of the Ground Forces post 1945. They were slowly converted to 'Army Corps' though they still mostly consisted of Rifle and then Motor Rifle Divisions.

List of Soviet Rifle Corps 22 June 1941

  • 1st Rifle Corps - 10th Army, Western Special MD, under General Major F.D. Rubtsov with 2nd and 8th Rifle Divisions. Last mention in the Soviet Order of Battle (OOB) on 1 July 1941 with corps directly subordinated to the Western Front. The corps reappeared in the OOB on 1 June 1942 directly subordinated to the North Caucausus Front, and made up of four rifle brigades. Thereafter, the last 1942 OOB mention of the corps is on 1 August 1942. The 1st Rifle Corps reappears in the Soviet OOB on 1 September 1943 as part of the Northwestern Front. Final mention on 1 May 1945 subordinated to the 1st Shock Army and in command of the 306th, 344th, and 357th Rifle Divisions. Feskov et al 2004 says the corps headquarters, as well as the 4th Shock Army, was moved to Central Asia after the end of the war and established at Ashgabat.[4]
  • 2nd Rifle Corps - formed in September 1922 as the 2nd Army Corps. As part of 13th Army Western Front participated in the Battle of Bialystok-Minsk near the Minsk and Slutsky Fortified Regions.[5] in late June - early July, 1941.[6] Reformed and fought against Japan in 1945.
  • 3rd Rifle Corps- 4th Rifle Division, 20th Mountain Rifle, 47th Mtn Rifle, as part of Transcaucasus Military District.[7] Upgraded to 46th Army in July 1941 with 4th Rifle, and 9th and 47th Mountain, and in 1941-42 part of Transcaucasus Front, watching the USSR border with Turkey and the Black Sea. Assigned to Steppe Front and then 2nd Ukrainian Front from Sept 1943.[8]
  • 4th Rifle Corps - 27th, 56th, and 85th Rifle Divisions, as part of 3rd Army.[9] (see ru:4-й стрелковый корпус (1-го формирования))
  • 5th Rifle Corps - 13th, 86th, and 113th Rifle Divisions, part of 10th Army, WSMD. With 2nd Far East Front during the Soviet invasion of Manchuria in 1945.
  • 6th Rifle Corps - 41st, 97th, and 159th Rifle Divisions, part of 6th Army, Kiev Special Military District[10]
  • 7th Rifle Corps - in the Odessa Military District, under General Major K.L. Dobroserdov included 116th, 196th, and 206th Rifle Divisions.[11] See ru:7-й стрелковый корпус.
  • 8th Rifle Corps - 26th Army, Kiev Special Military District, under General Major M.G. Snegov with 99th, 173rd Rifle Divisions and 72nd Mountain Rifle Division[12]
  • 9th Rifle Corps -in the Odessa Military District
  • 10th Rifle Corps -assigned to the 8th Army in the Baltic Military District (BSMD). Included the 10th, 48th, and 90th Rifle Divisions.[13] After the war, in Ural Military District until 1957.[14]
  • 11th Rifle Corps -assigned to the 8th Army in the Baltic Special Military District, with the 11th, and 125th Rifle Divisions.[15]
  • 12th Rifle Corps - Transbaikal Military District, with 65th and 94th Rifle Divisions[16]
  • 13th Rifle Corps, - First formed 1922 and disbanded 1935. Reformed 1936, in 12th Army, Kiev Special Military District, under General Major N.K. Kirillov, with 44th, 58th, and 192nd Mountain Rifle Divisions on 22 June 1941.
  • 14th Rifle Corps - 9th Army, Odessa Military District, under General Major D.G. Egorov comprising the 25th and 51st Rifle Divisions. By the end of the war, 14th Rifle Corps was a direct-reporting formation of 2nd Belorussian Front, including 90th Guards Rifle Division.
  • 15th Rifle Corps - Kiev Special Military District assigned to the 5th Army with the 45th, and 62nd Rifle Divisions.[17]
  • 16th Rifle Corps - assigned to the 11th Army in the Baltic Military District, including the 5th, 33rd, and 188th Rifle Divisions.[15] Used to form Headquarters, 48th Army on 7 August 1941. Reformed in Transcaucasian Front on 20 November 1942.
  • 17th Rifle Corps - 12th Army, Kiev Special MD, under General Major I.V. Galanin comprising the 60th, 69th Mountain Rifle, and 164th Rifle Divisions.
  • 18th Rifle Corps - From 1934 to 1938 included the 12th Amurskaya Rifle Division. In 1941 was part of the 15th Army, Soviet Far East Front, under General Major V.A. Zaitsev with 34th Rifle Division and 202nd Airborne Brigade
  • 19th Rifle Corps - assigned to the 23rd Army, Leningrad Military District with the 115th and 142nd Rifle Divisions.
  • 20th Rifle Corps - with the 137th and 160th Rifle Divisions, part of the STAVKA Reserve[18]
  • 21st Rifle Corps - assigned to the WSMD with the 17th, 24th, and 37th Rifle Divisions.[19]
  • 22nd Rifle Corps -180th and 182nd Rifle Divisions, part of 27th Army, BSMD[20] Estonian Territorial Rifle Corps.[21] The 22nd Estonian Territorial Rifle Corps of about 7.000 Estonians was destroyed while fighting for the Soviets in 1941: 2,000 were killed, and 4.500 taken prisoner by the Germans. The rest, the recruits, were initially used in Construction Battalions”, effectively mobile forced labour.[22]
  • 23rd Rifle Corps - in the Transcaucasus Military District comprising 136th Rifle Division and 138th Mountain Rifle Division under General Major K.F. Baranov[7]
  • 24th Rifle Corps - comprised the 181st and 183rd Rifle Divisions, part of 27th Army, BSMD. Latvian Territorial Rifle Corps.[21] 1945 finished war in Germany as part of 13th Army - 117th Rifle Division, 380th Rifle Division, 395th Rifle Division.
  • 25th Rifle Corps - 127th, 134th and 162nd Rifle Divisions, part of 19th Army[23]
  • 26th Rifle Corps - comprised the 21st, 22nd Rifle Division, and 26th Rifle Divisions, part of First Red Banner Army, Soviet Far East Front
  • 27th Rifle Corps - assigned to the 5th Army and composed of the 87th, 124th, and 135th Rifle Divisions.[17]
  • 28th Rifle Corps - comprised the 6th, 42nd, 49th, and 75th Rifle Divisions as part of 4th Army
  • 29th Rifle Corps - assigned to the 11th Army in the Baltic Military District, including the 179th and 181st Rifle Divisions.[15] Lithuanian Territorial Rifle Corps.[21]
  • 30th Rifle Corps - in the Orel Military District, including the 19th, 149th and 217th Rifle Divisions.[24] Reformed and assigned to 18th Army, 4th Ukrainian Front in 1944 in the Mukachevo - Uzhgorod area during Carpathian-Uzhgorod Offensive Operation (9 September 1944 - 28 September 1944)[25]
  • 31st Rifle Corps - composed of the 193rd, 195th, and 200th Rifle Divisions[12]
  • 32nd Rifle Corps - 46th and 152nd Rifle Divisions, with 16th Army, STAVKA Reserve[26]
  • 33rd Rifle Corps - in the Orel Military District, including 89th, 120th, and 145th Rifle Divisions.[13]
  • 34th Rifle Corps - 129th, 158th and 171st Rifle Divisions, part of 19th Army[23]
  • 35th Rifle Corps - 9th Army, Odessa Military District, comprising the 95th and 176th Rifle Divisions.[12]
  • 36th Rifle Corps - composed of the 140th, 146th, and 228th Rifle Divisions[12]
  • 37th Rifle Corps - in the Kiev Special Military District, assigned to the 6th Army, including 80th, 139th, and 141st Rifle Divisions.[17]
  • 39th Rifle Corps - comprised the 32nd, 40th, and 92nd Rifle Divisions, part of 25th Army, Soviet Far East Front[27]
  • 40th Rifle Corps - in the Transcaucasus Military District under General Major A. A. Khadeev with 9th Rifle Division and 31st Rifle Division.[7]
  • 41st Rifle Corps -in the Moscow Military District included 118th and 235th Rifle Divisions[28]
  • 42nd Rifle Corps - Assigned to the 14th Army, Leningrad Military District with the 104th and 22nd Rifle Divisions.[29] First Formation 22 June 1941, disbanded 14 October 1941; was used to reinforce the Kandalksha operational group)[30]
  • 44th Rifle Corps - under HQ Western Special Military District, comprised the 64th and 108th Rifle Divisions under General Major V.A. Yushkevich.
  • 45th Rifle Corps - with the 187th, 227th and 232nd Rifle Divisions, part of the STAVKA Reserve[18]
  • 47th Rifle Corps - under HQ Western Special Military District, comprised the 55th, 121st, and 143rd Rifle Divisions.[31]
  • 48th Rifle Corps - 9th Army, Odessa Military District, comprising the 30th Mountain Rifle and 74th Rifle Divisions.[12]
  • 49th Rifle Corps - composed of the 190th, 197th and 199th Rifle Divisions[12]
  • 50th Rifle Corps - Assigned to the 23rd Army, Leningrad Military District with the 43rd, 70th and 123rd Rifle Divisions.[32] Used to form 42nd Army in August 41. Reformed in May-June 1943 and initially assigned to 38th Army. Disbanded in June-July 1945.
  • 51st Rifle Corps, with 98th, 112th, and 153rd Rifle Divisions, part of the 22nd Army[33]
  • 52nd Rifle Corps, with its HQ in Novosibirsk, Siberian Military District along with the 133rd Rifle Division, additionally had the 166th Rifle Division at Barabinsk and the 178th Rifle Division at Omsk, part of 24th Army.[34] Became 30th Army on 13 July 1941.
  • 53rd Rifle Corps at Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Military District, where the 119th Rifle Division was stationed, also included the 107th Rifle Division at Barnaul and the 91st Rifle Division at Achinsk, part of 24th Army[34]
  • 55th Rifle Corps - composed of the 130th, 169th, and 189th Rifle Divisions [12]
  • 58th Rifle Corps - composed of the 68th, 83rd, and 194th Mountain Rifle Divisions in the Central Asia Military District[35]
  • 59th Rifle Corps - composed of the 39th and 59th Rifle Divisions, part of 1st Red Banner Army, Soviet Far East Front
  • 60th Rifle Corps - Western Special Military District. 7th, 8th, and 214th Airborne Brigades. Became 4th Airborne Corps 23 June 1941.
  • 61st Rifle Corps (110th, 144th, 172nd Rifle Divisions), 20th Army, Stavka Reserve
  • 62nd Rifle Corps - 170th, 174th, and 186th Rifle Divisions, with 22nd Army[33]
  • 63rd Rifle Corps - 53rd, 148th, and 167th Rifle Divisions, with 21st Army[36]
  • 64th Rifle Corps - North Caucasus Military District with the 165th, and 175th Rifle Divisions.[13]
  • 65th Rifle Corps - Headquarters only assigned to the Baltic Special Military District.[15]
  • 66th Rifle Corps - 61st, 117th, and 154th Rifle Divisions, with 21st Army[36]
  • 67th Rifle Corps - with the 102nd, 132nd, and 151st Rifle Divisions, part of the STAVKA Reserve[18]
  • 69th Rifle Corps (73, 229, 233 Rifle Divisions), 20th Army, Stavka Reserve
  • Special Rifle Corps (79th Rifle Division and 101st Mountain Rifle Division), Far Eastern Front

List of Soviet Rifle Corps formed during World War II

Almost all Soviet Rifle Corps were disbanded in the first several months of the war and reformed as the Soviet High Command gained experience in commanding large numbers of forces.

  • 38th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet Order of Battle (OOB) 1 June 1943, as part of the 50th Army, Western Front. Subordinate divisions at this date were the 17th, 326th, and 413th Rifle Divisions.
  • 43rd Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 June 1943, as part of the 2nd Shock Army, Leningrad Front. Subordinate divisions at this date were the 11th, 128, and 314th Rifle Divisions.
  • 46th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as part of the 61st Army, Bryansk Front. Subordinate divisions at this time were the 356th and 415th Rifle Divisions.
  • 54th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 June 1943, as part of the 51st Army, Southern Front. Subordinate divisions at this time were the 87th, 99th, and 302nd Rifle Divisions.
  • 56th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as part of the 16th Army, Far Eastern Front. Subordinate divisions at this time were the 79th and 101st Rifle Divisions. Apparent assignment of numeric designation to the Special Rifle Corps that disappears from the Soviet OOB on the same date.
  • 57th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 September 1943, as part of the 37th Army, STAVKA Reserve. Subordinate divisions at this time were the 62nd Guards, 92nd Guards, 110th Guards, and 53rd Rifle Divisions.
  • 68th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as part of the 57th Army, Southwestern Front. Subordinate divisions at this time were the 19th, 52nd, and 303rd Rifle Divisions.
  • 70th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the Western Front.
  • 71st Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and as part of the 31st Army, Western Front.
  • 72nd Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the 68th Army, Western Front.
  • 73rd Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and as part of the 52nd Army, STAVKA Reserve.
  • 74th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and as part of the Moscow Military District.
  • 75th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and as part of the Moscow Military District.
  • 76th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and as part of the Moscow Military District.
  • 77th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and as part of the Moscow Military District.
  • 78th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the Ural Military District.
  • 79th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the Ural Military District. This corps commanded units that stormed the Reichstag on 2 May 1945. (150th, 171st, 207th Rifle Divisions on July 9, 1945, on formation of Group of Soviet Forces in Germany)
  • 80th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the Trans-Volga Military District.
  • 81st Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 August 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the 68th Army, Western Front.
  • 82nd Rifle Corps
  • 83rd Rifle Corps (119th, 339, 360th Rifle Divisions) as part of 4th Shock Army on 1 December 1944 (BSSA)
  • 84th Rifle Corps
  • 85th Rifle Corps
  • 86th Rifle Corps
  • 87th Rifle Corps - see 33rd Motor Rifle Division#Service in the invasion of Manchuria. On 9 August 1945 comprised 342nd Rifle Division and 345th Rifle Division plus 914th Signals Battalion, 967th Engineer Battalion, plus an artillery regiment.[37]
  • 88th Rifle Corps
  • 89th Rifle Corps
  • 90th Rifle Corps
  • 91st Rifle Corps
  • 92nd Rifle Corps
  • 93rd Rifle Corps
  • 94th Rifle Corps (124th, 221st, 358th Rifle Divisions) and 113th Rifle Corps (192, 262, 338th Rifle Divisions) with 39th Army, RVGK on 1 May 1945),[38]
  • 95th Rifle Corps
  • 96th Rifle Corps
  • 97th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 November 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the Moscow Military District.
  • 98th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 November 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the Moscow Military District.
  • 99th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 November 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the Moscow Military District. Later part of 14th Army, and 19th Army.
  • 100th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 November 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the Moscow Military District.
  • 101st Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 September 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the Trans-Volga Military District.
  • 102nd Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 November 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the Trans-Volga Military District.
  • 103rd Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 November 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the Trans-Volga Military District.
  • 104th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 November 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the North Caucasus Military District.
  • 105th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 November 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the North Caucasus Military District.
  • 106th Rifle Corps - first appears in Soviet OOB 1 November 1943, as a headquarters with no troops assigned and part of the North Caucasus Military District.
  • 107th Rifle Corps
  • 108th Rifle Corps - 372nd Rifle Division assigned to this corps from 1 September 1944 to 1 May 1945.
  • 109th Rifle Corps
  • 110th Rifle Corps
  • 111th Rifle Corps
  • 112th Rifle Corps
  • 113th Rifle Corps
  • 114th Rifle Corps
  • 115th Rifle Corps
  • 116th Rifle Corps
  • 117th Rifle Corps
  • 118th Rifle Corps
  • 119th Rifle Corps
  • 120th Rifle Corps
  • 121st Rifle Corps
  • 122nd Rifle Corps
  • 123rd Rifle Corps
  • 124th Rifle Corps
  • 125th Rifle Corps
  • 126th Rifle Corps
  • 127th Rifle Corps
  • 128th Rifle Corps
  • 129th Rifle Corps
  • Latvian 130th Rifle Corps of the Order of Suvorov.
  • 132nd Rifle Corps - formed part of 19th Army
  • 133rd Rifle Corps
  • 134th Rifle Corps - formed part of 19th Army
  • 135th Rifle Corps

Guards Rifle Corps

1st - 40th Guards Rifle Corps formed after June 22, 1941:

  • 1st Guards Special Rifle Corps was formed in late 1941
  • 1st Guards Rifle Corps
  • 2nd Guards Rifle Corps - still active in the Baltic Military District in 1955 (Feskov et al.).
  • 3rd Guards Rifle Corps
  • 4th Guards Rifle Corps (3rd Ukrainian Front) from November 1943 commanded by G.E. Afanas'evich, former commander of the Soviet Airborne Forces. From 8th Guards Army, the corps headquarters was relocated to Talinn in Estonia around 1947, with 48th Rifle Division and 36th Guards Mechanised Division from the disbanded 10th Guards Army.[14] Still active in the Baltic Military District in 1955.
  • 5th Guards Rifle Corps (17th Guards Rifle Division, 19th Guards Rifle Division and 91st Guards Rifle Divisions), 1 May 1945 with 39th Army.[38] Same three divisions with 39th Army at Port Arthur in the early 1950s.
  • 6th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 7th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 8th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 9th Guards Rifle Corps Formed in June 1942 in the Kaluga region on the basis of the 12th Guards Rifle Division. Spent entire war as part of the 61st Army. Took part in the Orel offensive after Kursk, Chernigov-Priyat, and Gomel-Rechitsa Offensive.[39] Still active in the Belarussian Military District in 1955.
  • 10th 'Budapest' Guards Rifle Corps. Took part in liberation of Odessa alongside 37th Rifle Corps, as part of 5th Shock Army, 3rd Ukrainian Front.[40] At Battle of Debrecen. Circa 1956, 10th Guards 'Budapest' Rifle Corps formerly part of the Odessa Military District with headquarters at Kishinev, became 14th Guards Army.
  • 11th Guards Rifle Corps - still active in the Voronezh Military District in 1955.
  • 12th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 13th Guards Rifle Corps - became 13th Guards Army Corps postwar, stationed in Moscow Military District. Disbanded by being redesignated 22nd Army 1990-91.
  • 14th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 15th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 16th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 17th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 18th Guards Rifle Corps - Formed April 1943. 18th Guards Red Banner Stanislavsky-Budapest. General Lieutenant I.M. Afonin (Иван Михайлович Афонин) took command of the corps in February 1943. Assigned to armies including the 13th, 60th, 1st Guards, 38th Army, 18th, 46th, and 53rd Army.[41] After the war with Japan the Corps was transferred from Transbaikal to the Siberian Military District (Omsk). Later included the 109th Guards, 67th and 95th MRD (former 109th Guards, 56th and 198th RD) and 411 Guards Corps artillery regiment. Presumably in 1960, it was reorganised as Headquarters 49th Guards Rocket Division, Strategic Rocket Forces.[42]
  • 19th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 20th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 21st Guards Rifle Corps
  • 22nd Guards Rifle Corps
  • 23rd Guards Rifle Corps
  • 24th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 25th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 26th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 27th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 28th Guards Rifle Corps - originally formed as 15th Rifle Corps (second formation). See brief sketch history in Bonn 2005.[43]
  • 29th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 30th Guards Red Banner Leningrad Rifle Corps[44] - became 30th Guards Army Corps after World War II, and based at Vyborg in the Leningrad Military District for many years until 1998.[45]
  • 31st Guards Rifle Corps
  • 32nd Guards Rifle Corps
  • 33rd Guards Rifle Corps
  • 34th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 35th Guards Rifle Corps - Although it never fought in the vicinity of Prokhorovka, the 35th Guard Rifle Corps confronted the supportive actions of the III Panzer Corps on the right flank of II SS Panzer Corps during the Battle of Prokhorovka (precisely, during Operation Roland).[46]
  • 36th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 37th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 38th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 39th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 40th Guards Rifle Corps
  • 41st Guards Rifle Corps Estonian Tallinn. Formed 1945 from 8th Estonian Rifle Corps

Notes

Sources

  • БОЕВОЙ СОСТАВ СОВЕТСКОЙ АРМИИ 1941 - 1945 (Official Soviet Army Order of Battle from General Staff Archives).
  • V.I. Feskov, et al. The Soviet Army in the Years of the Cold War: 1945-91, Tomsk: Tomsk University Publishing House, 2004.
  • David M. Glantz, Stumbling Colossus, Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1998. ISBN 0-7006-0879-6.
  • David M. Glantz and Jonathan House, When Titans Clashed, Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1995. ISBN 0-7006-0899-0.
  • Robert G. Poirier and Albert Z. Conner, The Red Army Order of Battle in the Great Patriotic War, Novato: Presidio Press, 1985. ISBN 0-89141-237-9.
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