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Pickled onion

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Title: Pickled onion  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Onion, Skips (snack), List of accompaniments to french fries, Allium, Snow Mountain Garlic
Collection: English Cuisine, Onion-Based Foods, Pickles
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Pickled onion

A jar of home made pickled onions in spiced malt vinegar
A dish of pickled silverskin onions
Dutch Amsterdamse uitjes: small onions pickled with spices; the yellow colour is from either turmeric or saffron. Here served with ossenworst (smoked minced beef).

Pickled onions are a food item consisting of onions pickled in a solution of vinegar and salt, often with other preservatives and flavourings.[1] In the United Kingdom they are often eaten alongside fish and chips or as part of a ploughman's lunch. There is a variety of small white pickled onions known as 'silverskin' onions, frequently used as an essential component of the Martini cocktail variant known as a Gibson.

Pickled onions are usually pickled in malt vinegar and the onions are about an inch in diameter. Silverskin onions are pickled in white vinegar, and are much smaller. Full sized onions, e.g. Spanish Onions, can be pickled if sliced first.

In the Southern United States, pickled Vidalia onions can be served as a side dish.

In Hong Kong, pickled onions are served in many Cantonese restaurants, especially around dinner time, as a small dish before the main course is served.

In Switzerland, they are served to accompany raclette, along with pickled gherkins.

In Mexican cuisine, one preparation, cebollas curtidas, has sliced red onions pickled in a mixture of citrus juices and vinegar, which is served as a garnish or condiment. Sometimes cooked beets are added, producing a more strongly pink coloured dish.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Channel 4 Recipes - Pickled Onions. Retrieved 26 May 2014
  2. ^ Latina Lite Cooking: 200 Delicious Lowfat Recipes from All Over the Americas - With Special Selections on Nutrition and Weight Loss, Maria Dolores Beatriz. Hachette Book Group, 2009, page 102
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