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Mordecai Shehori

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Mordecai Shehori

Mordecai Shehori is an Israeli-American pianist.

Biography

Mordecai Shehori was born in Israel and studied in Tel Aviv with Mindru Katz, whom he cites as his most influential teacher.[1] At the age of nine he gave his first public performance. Later he received first prize in the Beethoven Competition[2] and received the American Israel Cultural Foundation Award. In New York, he studied with Claude Frank at the Mannes College of Music and graduated from the Juilliard School.

Shehori made his New York debut after winning the 1974 Jeunesses Musicales Competition.[2] He concertises in the United States, Canada, and Europe and has performed at various music festivals and at the White House. He has given 27 different recital programs in New York in as many years. His critically acclaimed commercial recordings for Connoisseur Society and Cembal d'amour include music by Beethoven, Chopin, Scarlatti, Liszt, Rameau, Rachmaninoff, and many others. He is a two-time recipient of the La Gesse Foundation Award,[3] and is listed on the roster of Steinway & Sons.[4]

In February 1987, Shehori played two pianos with Vladimir Horowitz. Shehori accompanied Horowitz in Mozart's Piano Concerto K.488, playing the orchestral reduction on second piano, while Horowitz played the concerto's solo part. This took place in the basement of Steinway & Sons in New York City.[5] Later that year, Horowitz traveled to Milan and recorded the concerto for Deutsche Grammophon with the La Scala Theater Orchestra conducted by Carlo Maria Giulini.[6]

Horowitz was so pleased with Shehori's accompaniment that he began to invite him to his home on East 94th Street. Shehori spent many evenings with the Horowitzes.[7] Shehori acted as page turner for Horowitz in what turned out to be the sessions for his final recording in Horowitz's New York home from October 24, 1989 to November 1, 1989. Horowitz died just a few days later, on November 5, 1989. Shehori has cited his friendship and artistic collaboration with Vladimir Horowitz as a significant source of knowledge and inspiration.


References

Reviews of Concerts

  • Ericson, Raymond, et al. (1974). "Music in Review; Israeli Pianist in Debut Here" New York Times. March 24.
  • (1976). "Mordecai Shehori Gives Piano Recital" New York Times. June 3.
  • Ericson, Raymond (1979). "Piano Recital: Shehori Plays Three Sonatas". New York Times. May 26.
  • . May 18.
  • Rivers, Kate (1984). "Shehori: Poetry in Music" The Washington Post. November 3.
  • . May 22.
  • . June 9.
  • . May 9.
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  • . June 17.
  • . June 12.

Reviews of Recordings

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  • Haylock, Julian (July 2008). "The Celebrated New York Concerts Volume 3 Mordecai Shehori, piano" .
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External links

  • Commercial discography of Mordecai Shehori
  • Biographical notes on Mordecai Shehori
  • The Papers of Vladimir and Wanda Toscanini Horowitz Irving S. Gilmore Music Library, Yale University. Photographs of Horowitz taken by Mordecai Shehori
  • Article by Mordecai Shehori describing his friendship and artistic collaboration with Vladimir Horowitz
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