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Lindsay Ashford (author)

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Lindsay Ashford (author)

Lindsay Ashford is a British crime novelist and journalist. Her style writing has been compared to that of Vivien Armstrong, Linda Fairstein and Frances Fyfield. Many of her books follow the character of Megan Rhys, an investigative psychologist.

Raised in Wolverhampton, Ashford became the first woman to graduate from Queens' College, Cambridge in its 550 year history. She gained a degree in criminology. Ashford was then employed as a reporter for the BBC before becoming a freelance journalist, writing for a number of national magazines and newspapers. In 1996, Ashford took a crime writing course run by the Arvon Foundation. Her first book, Frozen, was published by Honno in 2003.

Strange Blood was shortlisted for the 2006 Theakston's Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year Award.[1] She wrote The Rubber Woman for the Quick Reads series in 2007.

Her latest novel, The Mysterious Death of Miss Austen was published on June 12, 2012.

Ashford divides her time between a home on the Welsh coast near Aberystwyth, Wales and the village of Chawton in Hampshire .[2]

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