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Fairchild XC-120 Packplane

 

Fairchild XC-120 Packplane

XC-120 Packplane
Composite image of the sole XC-120 on the ground, and in flight.
Role Military transport aircraft
Manufacturer Fairchild
First flight 11 August 1950
Number built 1
Developed from C-119 Flying Boxcar

The Fairchild XC-120 Packplane was an American experimental transport aircraft first flown in 1950. It was developed from the company's C-119 Flying Boxcar, and was unique in the unconventional use of removable cargo pods that were attached below the fuselage, instead of possessing an internal cargo compartment.

Contents

  • Design and development 1
  • Operational history 2
  • Specifications (XC-120) 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Design and development

The XC-120 Packplane began as a C-119B fuselage (48-330, c/n 10312) which was cut off at a point just below the flight deck. The wings were angled upwards between the engines and the fuselage, raising the fuselage by several feet and giving the plane an inverted gull wing appearance. Smaller diameter "twinned" wheels were installed forward of each of the main landing gear struts to serve as nosewheels, while the main struts were extended backwards.

All four landing gear units, in matching "nose" and "main" sets, could be raised and lowered in a scissorlike fashion to lower the aircraft and facilitate the removal of a planned variety of wheeled pods which would be attached below the fuselage for the transport of cargo. The goal was to allow cargo to be preloaded into the pods; it was claimed that such an arrangement would speed up loading and unloading cargo.[1]

Production aircraft were to be designated C-128.

Operational history

Only one XC-120 was built. Though the aircraft was tested extensively and made numerous airshow appearances in the early 1950s the project went no further. The sole prototype was eventually scrapped.

Specifications (XC-120)

XC-120 without its cargo container
The XC-120 on the ground

General characteristics

See also

Related development
Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era
Related lists

References

  1. ^ Micheal O'Leary (November 1978). "Those Fabulous Flops". Air Progress. 
  • Evans, Stanley H. "Cargo Carrier Concept:Design-logic for Airborne Logistics: The Fairchild XC-120 Pack-plane". Flight, 21 September 1950. pp. 331–333.

External links

  • Video about the XC-120
  • The short film Big Picture: Chinese Reds Enter the Korean War is available for free download at the Internet Archive Contains segment about the plane.
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