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Cocktail onion

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Title: Cocktail onion  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Allium, Whisk, Cocktail garnishes, List of martini variations, Snow Mountain Garlic
Collection: Cocktail Garnishes, Onion-Based Foods
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
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Cocktail onion

A jar of cocktail onions.

A cocktail onion is usually a pearl onion pickled in a brine with small amounts of turmeric and paprika. Pearl onions are naturally sweet, which makes them an excellent pairing with many cocktails. Other sweet onions such as the crystal wax, also known as the white Bermuda, are also sometimes used. In many cases, white varieties of these sweet onions are used, since many consumers expect cocktail onions to be white. However, yellow or red sweet onions may be used as well. In northern California cuisine some haute bars may use sliced red onion pickled in vinegar. Some recipes also call for the onions to be packed in white vermouth as well as vinegar

Generally, the onion retains a slightly crunchy texture through the brining process, which can add a different mouthfeel to the drinking experience. Since the cocktail onion is made from a sweet onion, it is unlikely to upset the digestion with a sulfurous or eye-watering taste, although some cultures use more pungent onions as cocktail garnishes.

Use as a garnish

While not as widely used as more common garnishes such as olives or lemon twists, the cocktail onion is the signature garnish of the [[Gibson (cocktail)

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