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Charlie Albright

Charlie Albright
찰리 박 올브라이트
Charlie Albright
Charlie Albright
Background information
Born Washington, United States
Origin Centralia, Washington
Genres Classical
Occupations Pianist, Composer, Improviser
Instruments Piano
Years active 1991-present
Website CharlieAlbright.com

Charlie Albright (Korean: 찰리 박 올브라이트) is an American-born classical pianist. He is a 2010 Gilmore Young Artist,[1] an official Steinway Artist,[2] and former Young Concert Artist[3][4] He is professionally managed by the Arts Management Group (AMG), which also represents such artists as Mitsuko Uchida and Vladimir Feltsman.[5] He graduated from Harvard College (B.A.) and the New England Conservatory (M.M.) as the first classical pianist in the 5-Year Harvard University/New England Conservatory BA/MM Joint Program, and has been named the Harvard University Leverett House Artist in Residence for 2011–2012 and one of the 15 Most Interesting Seniors of the Harvard College Class of 2011.[6] He is currently in the prestigious Artist Diploma (A.D.) program at the Juilliard School of Music.[7]

A frequent collaborator with such artists as Yo-Yo Ma (5 concerts), The New York Times praised Charlie's "Jaw-dropping technique" and described his playing as "Virtuosity with a distinctive musicality throughout."[8] The Washington Post declared that "Albright is among the most gifted musicians of his generation."[9]

Reviews and reception

Albright has been critically acclaimed by many of the world's most prominent news sources and reviewers.

The Washington Post declared that "Albright is among the most gifted musicians of his generation." It continued that "An impressive range of differently colored sounds at the keyboard was matched by overwhelming virtuosity" and that Albright "leapt the most outrageous technical hurdles...with a sense of dangerous self-abandon that was thrilling to hear. At the same time, musical shape was never sacrificed to showmanship."[9]

The New York Times praised Charlie's "Jaw-dropping technique" and described his playing as "Virtuosity with a distinctive musicality throughout"[8]

The Boston Musical Intelligencer wrote that if Albright "is not indisputably first among equals, he seems to me unsurpassed, anyway, and on the top tier. I will be surprised to hear another performance at this level very soon. It was gripping, frankly, both spellbinding and spellbound, quite unlike most such solo recitals I’ve heard over the decades." "[10] On a separate occasion, they wrote that "Albright has the requisite chops of a competition winner, but the beauty, sensitivity, and taste of a mature artist. is Schubert was ravishing, imaginative, poetic—full of poignancy and lyricism. It would seem Albright is a born Schubert player, whose taste is simply impeccable. His interpretation sounded spontaneous, but this was also heartfelt, mature playing. Everything had been thought out by a mind brimming with musical intelligence." In response to his improvised encore, they wrote that "Albright is a master of improvisation." [11]

Rochester, New York's Democrat and Chronicle described Albright as a "keyboard wizard" who "played like an angel...with a level of polish pianists twice his age would envy."

The Arizona Republic declared that "Pianist Charlie Albright steals Phoenix Symphony show" at his debut with the orchestra on November 3, 2011.[12]

The Daily Gazette raved about Albright's Albany, NY debut on January 28, 2012. "Albright galvanized a capacity crowd...not only with a superb technical display but also a level of musicianship that could only be called poetically magical." "His program showed off some of the things he does best: a frothy, fleet, effortless technique; a singing tone that is like a caress; phrasing that breathes and lifts with exquisite nuances; and an exuberance that is as sunny as it is intense, passionate and effervescent." Furthermore, "Albright's 12 Chopin Etudes were...perfect."[13]

The Lansing City Pulse declared that Albright "broke every heart on board. He played...like a consummate actor whose pianistic skill was a mere bonus." It also wrote of his "tireless dexterity," "split-second timing," and how "his polish and poise disguised the hard work in a cloak of drama." Dubbed "The Albright effect," it was raved that he "steals (the) Lansing Symphony finale."[14]

Robert Sherman of New York's WQXR-FM Radio refers to Albright as a "poet of the piano."

The Journal & Courier wrote "The cost of a LSO ticket Saturday night: Priceless. Albright played with flawless and dazzling technique, great sensitivity and musicality, but also appeared to be engrossed in and enjoying himself at the piano. Musicality and sensitivity were great companions and partners with Albright’s technique and virtuosity." [15]

Vice President Joe Biden was quoted as stating that "If I did my job as well as you (Charlie) do yours, I'd be President."[7]

Childhood

Albright was raised in Centralia, Washington by a Korean mother and an American father. He says he began to play the piano at age three-and-a-half.[16]

Albright began playing by ear and from the age of four appeared on state and national television. He did not receive formal classical training until age seven when he began his studies with Nancy Adsit of Olympia, Washington.

During his time with Adsit, Albright was selected five times as an Olympia Chapter representative to the Washington State Music Teachers Convention (WSMTA) and received a Beaux Arts Society scholarship. In 1998, he made his orchestral debut with the University of Puget Sound Symphony. In 2000, he won prizes at the Central Washington University Sonatina/Sonata Festival and won the Olympia Chapter Concerto Festival, which led to a guest artist appearance with the Capital Area Youth Symphony in 2001.

Continuing to develop his performance career, Albright performed as part of the "Wonder Kids" concert in the Elsinore Piano Series in Salem, Oregon in 2001 and performed in a concert with Dr. Tanya Stambuck of the University of Puget Sound the following January. Other performances throughout Washington included solo debuts with the Olympia Symphony Orchestra and the Seattle Philharmonic in 2002.

Albright's success continued as a prizewinner in the Northwest Chopin Festival on February 1, 2003 and first prize winner in the 2003 Washington State MTNA Senior Piano Competition. Other concerts that year included appearances on the Steinway Young Artists Series in Seattle, Washington and a guest artist appearance with the Port Angeles Symphony in Port Angeles, Washington.

High school/early college

Albright attended Centralia High School, where he graduated in 2007. In 2005, he attended the Centralia College as part of the Running Start Program, where he graduated with his Associate of Science Degree with Highest Honors in 2007.

2004

Albright was selected as the youngest pianist in the Young Artist program of the 2004 TCU/Cliburn Piano Institute in Fort Worth, Texas. Additionally, he won the Washington State MTNA Senior Piano Competition a second time, the Northwest Division MTNA Senior Piano Competition in Missoula, Montana, and the Olympia Music Teachers Association Concerto Competition.

2005

Albright continued to perform extensively throughout the Pacific Northwest, including the 2005 Northwest Chopin Foundation Festival's Prizewinners' Concert at the Community Concerts Series in Centralia, Washington, and a concert with the Northwest Wind Symphony.

He was one of seven competitors in the 2005 National MTNA Senior Piano Competition.

Albright was the First Prize winner in the 2005 International Institute for Young Musicians (IIYM) International Piano Competition in Lawrence, Kansas.

Albright won the 2005 Washington State MTNA Senior Piano Competition for the third time, in November.

2006

Albright won Second Prize in the 2006 Schimmel Senior International Piano Competition in Tempe, Arizona.

In June, he was the first pianist ever to win both the Solo and Ensemble Divisions of the 2006 New York Biennial National Piano Competition in New York, New York.[17]

In August, he won first prize and all other prizes in the 2006 Eastman Young Artists' International Piano Competition at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, New York.[18] Other prizes included the "Audience Prize," the "Best Performance in a Master Class" prize, and the "Best Performance of a 21st Century Work" prize.[16]

Albright won the 2006 Washington State MTNA Senior Piano Competition for the fourth time, in November.

Albright gave a concert at the 5-year memorial of the 9/11/01 World Trade Center Attacks at New York's Trinity Church, a concert with the Metropolitan Opera Chamber Ensemble, and other concerts in Washington, D.C. and Massachusetts.

2007

Albright won Third Prize as the youngest pianist at age 18 and one of four Americans in the 2007 Hilton Head International Piano Competition in South Carolina against pianists through age 30.[19]

He participated in the 2007 Paris Piano Institute in August 2007 where he studied with Bruce Brubaker (musician).

College/graduate school career

Albright is the first classical pianist in the Harvard/New England Conservatory 5-Year BA/MM Joint Program, where he is pursuing a bachelor's degree in economics and completing a pre-medical curriculum at Harvard College (Class of 2011). He is also a Master of Music student in Piano Performance at the New England Conservatory of Music (Class of 2012).[20] He was named the Harvard University Leverett House Artist in Residence for 2011–2012 and continues a rigorous worldwide concert schedule of about thirty-four concerts per year (thirty-two during the school year) despite being a full-time student.[21]

2008

Albright won the 2007-2008 Harvard Bach Society Orchestra Competition as a freshman and performed the Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto, No. 1 with the group in February 2008.

During the summer, he competed in the 2008 Sydney International Piano Competition in Sydney, Australia, where he was a semi-finalist (top 12) and won the "Prize for the Best Performance of a 21st Century Work in Stage 1."[22]

On December 1, the pianist performed for the first time with cellist Yo-Yo Ma at the Harvard ceremony presenting the late Senator Ted Kennedy with an Honorary Doctorate degree. At the ceremony, guests included Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, Senator John Kerry, and then Vice-President-Elect Joe Biden, who was quoted telling Albright "If I did my job as well as you do yours, I'd be President."


2009

Albright received the 2009 Gilmore Young Artist Award, an award given to two pianists biannually after being anonymously considered for the award over the course of two years. The prestigious award comes with a $15,000 fund and an additional $10,000 for the commissioning of a new piece for the winner.

He performed twice more with cellist Yo-Yo Ma; once for the 60th Anniversary for the Universal Declaration of Human Rights with Nobel Laureate Toni Morrison (March, 2009) and once during a residency of the Silk Road Project (October, 2009).[23]


Albright was a semi-finalist (top 12) in the 2009 Top of the World International Piano Competition in Tromso, Norway[24] and won the "Elizabeth Leonskaya Special Award" at the 2009 Vendome Prize International Piano Competition in Lisbon, Portugal.

In October, Albright gave a concert and taught his first masterclass at Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA as a guest artist for the Sanford Piano Series.[25][26]

In November in New York City, Albright was one of four winners of the 2009 Young Concert Artists International Auditions where he won the Paul A. Fish First Prize, the Ruth Laredo Award, the Sander Buchman Prize, the Ronald A. Asherson Prize, and the Sander Buchman Prize, as well as four performance prizes. As a result, he is now signed with YCA for management.[27][28]

Albright performed approximately twenty-eight times in the 2009-2010 Concert Season. Concert venues included those in Paris, Los Angeles, Boston, Michigan, and New York.

He gave six concerts as a 2010 Gilmore Young Artist at the 2010 Gilmore Keyboard Festival in Michigan, where he received a review describing his playing as "Poetry in motion...with flair as well as fireworks." "Maturity might be a given for a Gilmore Young Artist. But Albright's professional polish was evident, not simply in the way he played the piece, but in the manner he played with the orchestra, as opposed to against or merely alongside it." The review concluded that "This college kid...is going places in music," and that "In Royce Auditorium on Thursday, Albright was number one all the way."[29][30]

Charlie Albright Scholarship and the Charlie Albright Piano

During September 2009, 7 students at the Centralia College received the "Charlie Albright Scholarship," organized by the Centralia College Foundation from funds raised by a concert Albright gave in 2008.

In December 2009, the Centralia College purchased the "Charlie Albright Piano" as a result of the "Charlie Albright Piano Project." Albright gave the inaugural performance on the 9-foot Model D Steinway, purchased for Corbet Hall, on March 27, 2010.[31][32][33][34][35]

2010

On July 22, 2010, Albright made his San Francisco Symphony debut with the Duke Ellington "New World A-Comin'" with conductor Alondra de la Parra.[36] He ended with an encore of Liszt's La Campanella to a standing ovation.

His German debut on August 20 at a castle outside of Hamburg was a huge success, with raving applause between movements, three sets of bows after the first half of the concert, and the "unusual" demand for three encores following the program.

Albright made his Seattle Symphony debut with the Beethoven Piano Concerto, No. 3 with conductor Gerard Schwarz on September 10, 2010.[16] [37]

Performances in Albright's 2010-2011 Concert Season also include concerts in Boston (Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum and the New England Conservatory's Jordan Hall with the Longwood Symphony Orchestra), New York (Merkin Concert Hall), and Washington, D.C. (John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts). He will also give masterclasses and have residencies throughout the country.[16]

After Albright's debut at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on February 14, 2011, The Washington Post wrote that "Albright is among the most gifted musicians of his generation." It continued that "An impressive range of differently colored sounds at the keyboard was matched by overwhelming virtuosity" and that Albright "leapt the most outrageous technical hurdles...with a sense of dangerous self-abandon that was thrilling to hear. At the same time, musical shape was never sacrificed to showmanship."[9]

Albright was named the Harvard University Leverett House Artist in Residence for 2011-2012. Previous Artists in Residence at Leverett have included the likes of cellist Yo-Yo Ma (1979–1981). In December 2010, he was named one of the 15 Most Interesting Seniors of the Harvard College Class of 2011.[6]

2011

On May 26, 2011, Albright graduated from Harvard College with a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree in economics.

Albright released his first commercial album, Vivace, in February 2011.

He made successful debuts with the Longwood Symphony Orchestra at Boston's Jordan Hall on May 14, 2011 and with the Boston Pops Orchestra at Boston's Symphony Hall on May 17–18, 2011.


In June, 2011, Albright was accepted to the roster of Steinway Artists.[2]

Albright was the first Artist-in-Residence of the 2011-2012 season of American Public Media's Performance Today, hosted by Fred Child. As such, he gave a weeklong series of performances and interviews for the national radio program.[38]

2012

On May 20, 2012, Albright graduated from the New England Conservatory of Music with a Master of Music (M.M.) degree in Piano Performance, having studied under Wha-Kyung Byun.[7] He was accepted as one of three pianists to the Juilliard School of Music's Artist Diploma (A.D.) program, where he studies with Yoheved Kaplinsky.[7]

2013

In 2013, Albright was named the recipient of the prestigious Arthur W. Foote Award of the Harvard Musical Association in Cambridge, MA.[16]

Albright was invited to give three All-Schubert solo concerts at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in 2013, to which the Boston Musical Intelligencer wrote that he was "unsurpassed" and "on the top tier." The author continued by writing that "It was gripping, frankly, both spellbinding and spellbound, quite unlike most such solo recitals I've heard over the decades."[10]

The second of the three Schubert-cycle concerts at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum was met with praise, with reviews hailing that "Albright is a born Schubert player. Albright has the requisite chops of a competition winner, but the beauty, sensitivity, and taste of a mature artist. His Schubert was ravishing, imaginative, poetic—full of poignancy and lyricism. His interpretation sounded spontaneous, but this was also heartfelt, mature playing. Everything had been thought out by a mind brimming with musical intelligence." [11]



2011-2012 concert season

Albright's 2011-2012 concert season included about 30 concerts and residencies throughout the United States. Highlights included a concert with cellist Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Project commemorating the 10-year remembrance of the 9/11 attacks (September, 2011); guest artist appearances with such orchestras as the Phoenix Symphony (November, 2011) and the Lansing Symphony Orchestra in the 2012 Gilmore Keyboard Festival (May, 2012); masterclasses at universities; and solo concerts.[39]

2012-2013 concert season

Albright's 2012-2013 concert season includes about 38 concerts and residencies, including a fifth concert with cellist Yo-Yo Ma in a roundtable discussion with dancer Damian Woetzel by the Aspen Institute Arts Program; guest artist appearances with the San Francisco Symphony (CA, 2nd time), Fort Smith Symphony (AK), Whatcom Symphony (WA), Great Falls Symphony (MT), Lafayette Symphony (IN), Fargo-Moorhead Symphony (ND), Olympia Symphony (WA), and Hilton Head Symphony (SC); and solo concerts at the Phillips Collection, Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, and the Mondavi Center at UC Davis.[7]

Arts Management Group signing

On June 1, 2013, Albright transitioned from Young Concert Artists to Arts Management Group (AMG) for his commercial management, which also represents such artists as Mitsuko Uchida and Vladimir Feltsman.[5] Young Concert Artists will continue to represent Charlie for concerts booked for the 2013-2014 concert season, with AMG representing all new concerts and performances, primarily beginning with the 2014-2015 Concert Season.[40]

Discography

2008

SIPCA 2008 Highlights

Vivace (2011)

Vivace
Studio album by Charlie Albright
Released February, 2011
Recorded December, 2010
Genre Classical
Label CAPC Music

Vivace is Albright's commercial debut album. The concert hall recording was completely unspliced, meaning that no editing of the notes occurred in any of the pieces. The album contains the following works:

Joseph Haydn (1732-1809), Piano Sonata No. 62 in E-Flat Major, Hob. 16/52
No. Title Length
1. "1. Allegro"   7:45
2. "2. Adagio"   6:25
3. "3. Finale (Presto)"   5:26
Gian Carlo Menotti (1911-2007), Ricercare and Toccata on a Theme from The Old Maid and the Thief
No. Title Length
4. "Ricercare"   4:21
5. "Toccata"   3:07
Robert Schumann (1810-1856) - Franz Liszt (1811-1886)
No. Title Length
6. "Widmung (Dedication)"   4:04
Leoš Janáček (1854-1928), Piano Sonata 1.X.1905 (From the Street)
No. Title Length
7. "1. Foreboding (Předtucha)"   6:31
8. "2. Smrt (Death)"   7:21
Frédéric Chopin (1810–1849), Etudes, Op. 25
No. Title Length
9. "1. Etude #1"   2:25
10. "2. Etude #2"   1:34
11. "3. Etude #3"   1:40
12. "4. Etude #4"   1:30
13. "5. Etude #5"   2:56
14. "6. Etude #6"   2:03
15. "7. Etude #7"   5:30
16. "8. Etude #8"   1:06
17. "9. Etude #9"   0:58
18. "10. Etude #10"   3:36
19. "11. Etude #11"   3:21
20. "12. Etude #12"   2:32
Charlie Albright (1988–present)
No. Title Length
21. "Touch the Peace"   1:55

References

External links

  • Charlie Albright's Blog
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