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Salim

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Salim

Salim
Pronunciation Arabic: sæˈliːm, saˈliːm
Egyptian Arabic: sɪˈliːm
Gender Male
Origin
Word/name Arabic
Meaning Safe, undamaged
Behind the Name

Salim (also spelled Saleem or Selim or Slim, Arabic: سليم‎, properly transliterated as Salīm ) is a given name of Arabic origin meaning "safe"[1] or "undamaged", related names are Selima, Salima, Saleemah, and Salma.

When transliterated, the name Salem (Arabic: سالم‎) can become indistinguishable in English, as the spelling Salim is also used, though with a long a and a short i sounds.

Contents

  • Given name 1
    • Saleem 1.1
    • Salim 1.2
    • Selim 1.3
  • Surname 2
  • Places 3
  • Other uses 4
  • See also 5
  • Notes 6

Given name

Saleem

Salim

  • Salim Nuruddin Jahangir (1569–1627), Mughal emperor, also known as Prince Salim
  • Salim (poet) (1800–1866), Kurdish poet
  • Salim Ali (1896–1987), Indian ornithologist
  • Salim Arrache (born 1982), Algerian footballer. He is currently an AC Ajaccio in French Ligue 1
  • Salim Cissé (born 1992), Guinean footballer who plays for Sporting Clube de Portugal as a forward
  • Salim Durani (born 1934), Indian cricketer
  • Salim Jreissati (born 1952), Lebanese jurist and politician
  • Salim Khan (born 1935), Indian scriptwriter
  • Salim Ghouse, film, television and theater actor, theater director and martial artist
  • Salim Kerkar (born 1987), French-Algerian footballer, who is currently unattached
  • Salim Moin (born 1961), football coach who currently coaches Woodlands Wellington in the S.League
  • Salim Ahmed Salim (born 1942), Tanzanian diplomat, who has worked in the international diplomatic arena
  • Salim Sdiri (born 1978), French long jumper of Tunisian descent
  • Salim Tuama (born 1979), Arab Israeli soccer player. He is a midfielder playing for Hapoel Tel Aviv
  • Salim Turky (born 1963), Tanzanian CCM politician and Member of Parliament for Mpendae constituency since 2010

Selim

Surname


Places

Other uses

  • Bassa Selim, a character in Mozart's opera The Abduction from the Seraglio
  • Selim Bradly, a character from the Japanese anime/manga Fullmetal Alchemist and Fullmetal Alchemist: Brotherhood
  • Selim (District), Kars, Turkey
  • Salim, Iran, places in Iran
  • Salim (film), a 2014 Tamil film
  • Saleem (film), a 2009 Telugu film
  • Selim (horse) (1802–1825), 19th-century Thoroughbred racehorse
  • Salim, Nablus, Palestinian village
  • Salim Ali Lake
  • Salim Khan family, refers to the family of Salim Khan. Multiple members of the family have been actors, film directors, producers and Writer in the Hindi film industry of India
  • Saleem Ali
  • Salim Baba, a 2007 American short documentary film directed by Tim Sternberg. It was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Short
  • Salim Group, Indonesia's biggest conglomerate with assets including Indofood Sukses Makmur, the world's largest instant noodle producer, and Bogasari, a large flour-milling operation. The group was founded by Sudono Salim
  • Selim railway station, a railway station in the town of Selim, Turkey. The station is served by the Eastern Express, operated by the Turkish State Railways from İstanbul to Kars

See also

  • Salaam
  • Salem
  • Salem (name), similar name that can become indistinguishable in transliteration as the spelling Salim is also used
  • Selim people, an ethnic group of Sudan. They speak Sudanese Arabic. Most members of this ethnic groups are Muslims. The population of this ethnic group is at several 10,000
  • Shalim, also transliterated as Salim, is the name of a Canaanite deity
  • Š-L-M, the triconsonantal root of many Semitic words, and many of those words are used as names
  • Salimi

Notes

  1. ^ Campbell, Mike. "Behind the Name: Meaning, Origin and History of the Name Salim". Retrieved 26 March 2011. 
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