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Academic genealogy of theoretical physicists

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Title: Academic genealogy of theoretical physicists  
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Subject: Lists of scientists, History of physics, Physicists, Academic genealogy, Mathematics Genealogy Project
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Academic genealogy of theoretical physicists

The following is an academic genealogy of theoretical physicists and is constructed by following the pedigree of thesis advisors. If an advisor did not exist, or if the field of physics is unrelated, an academic genealogical link can be constructed by using the university from which the theoretical physicist graduated.

The academic genealogy tree list the physicists PhD date and school, if known. Italicized names indicates that a sub-tree for this name appears elsewhere in the tree. Nobel Prize winners are indicated by . If physicists are advised by mathematicians, their genealogy can be readily traced using the Mathematics Genealogy Project.

Contents

  • Founding fathers 1
    • Max Planck 1.1
    • Albert Einstein 1.2
    • Arnold Sommerfeld 1.3
    • Max Born 1.4
    • Niels Bohr 1.5
    • Lev Landau 1.6
    • Hermann von Helmholtz 1.7
  • Mayflower branches 2
    • Enrico Fermi 2.1
    • Friedrich Hasenöhrl 2.2
    • Eugene Wigner 2.3
    • Henry Augustus Rowland 2.4
    • Hideki Yukawa 2.5
  • Modern European and other branches 3
    • Ralph H. Fowler 3.1
    • Abdus Salam 3.2
    • Léon Van Hove 3.3
  • Ancient lineages 4
    • Otto Mencke 4.1
    • Erhard Weigel 4.2
    • John Cranke 4.3
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Founding fathers

Max Planck

Albert Einstein

Arnold Sommerfeld

Max Born

Niels Bohr

Lev Landau

Hermann von Helmholtz

Mayflower branches

Enrico Fermi

Friedrich Hasenöhrl

Eugene Wigner

Henry Augustus Rowland

Hideki Yukawa

Modern European and other branches

Ralph H. Fowler

Abdus Salam

Léon Van Hove

Ancient lineages

The Max Born academic genealogy leads to Carl Friedrich Gauss and then on to Otto Mencke. The Sommerfeld genealogy leads to Felix Klein and then to Otto Mencke (via Gauss) and Gottfried Leibniz. The Leibniz heritage, however, is due to the premature death of Klein's advisor, Julius Plücker, which forced a second supervisor for the final examination, namely Rudolf Lipschitz.

Another advisor line in continental Europe descends from Leibniz via among others, Poisson, Lagrange, the Bernoullis, and Euler.

The main American branch's lineage proceeds via von Helmholtz to Burchard de Volder.

Otto Mencke

Erhard Weigel

John Cranke

See also

References

  1. ^ "Professor Ron Shaw, BA, PhD, ScD(Cantab)". The University of Hull. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  2. ^ a b c "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Roman Jackiw". North Dakota State University. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  3. ^ a b "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Rudolf Peierls". North Dakota State University. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  4. ^ "Nuclear Science Symposium to Honor Swiatecki". Berkeley Lab Communications Dept., Creative Services Office. 
  5. ^ Kapusta (2008). "Accelerator Disaster Scenarios, the Unabomber, and Scientific Risks".  
  6. ^ "Heinz Bilz" (in German). Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt. 2007-11-13. Archived from the original on 2007-11-13. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  7. ^ a b "Mathematics Genealogy Project - David Joseph Bohm". North Dakota State University. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  8. ^ "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Viktor Frederick Weisskopf". North Dakota State University. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  9. ^ a b c d "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Murray Gell-Mann". North Dakota State University. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  10. ^ "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Kenneth Geddes Wilson". North Dakota State University. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  11. ^ "David J. Griffiths". Reed College. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  12. ^ a b c "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Sidney Richard Coleman". North Dakota State University. Retrieved 2009-05-04. 
  13. ^ "As a student, Landau dared to correct Einstein in a lecture". Global Talent News. Retrieved 2012-02-02. 
  14. ^ a b """Charles W. Myles: Academic "Family Tree. Texas Tech University. 2002-12-02. Archived from the original on 22 April 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  15. ^ a b c d e "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Julian Seymour Schwinger". North Dakota State. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  16. ^ "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Charles Michael Sommerfield". North Dakota State. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  17. ^ "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Lowell S. Brown". North Dakota State. Retrieved 2014-08-22. 
  18. ^ "Mahanthappa, Kalyana T.". SLAC - Stanford University. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  19. ^ "Norman J.M. Horing - Professor". Stevens Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  20. ^ Max Jammer, "Fritz Rohrlich and his Work", Found. Phys. 24, 209 (1994).
  21. ^ a b c d "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Enrico Fermi". North Dakota State University. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  22. ^ a b c d Andraos, John (2002). "Fermi Tree" (PDF). Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  23. ^ "Frank Wilczek, Herman Feshbach Professor of Physics; 2004 Nobel Laureate". Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  24. ^ a b c d "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Sam Treiman". North Dakota State University. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  25. ^ "Claude Bernard". Washington University Physics Faculty. 
  26. ^ a b c d e f Andraos, John (2002). "Rowland Tree" (PDF). Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Mathematics Genealogy Project - Abdus Salam". North Dakota State University. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 
  28. ^ a b c d Renardy, Michael. "Comments and explanations". Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. Retrieved 2009-05-05. 

External links

  • Academic Genealogy of Physics
  • Notre Dame Physics Genealogy index
  • Spanish school academic genealogy list
  • Lineage of Kamerlingh Onnes and Bloembergen
  • Lineage of Lorentz and Van der Waals
  • Mathematics Genealogy Project
  • Neurotree genealogy
  • Chemical genealogy
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