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The Curse of Kali

By: Audrey Blankenhagen

...rangest of all empires.’ Macauley, 1833 On New Years Eve 1600, that most esteemed of English monarchs, Queen Elizabeth I, read the document pre... ...reen as emeralds and skin like magnolia petals?’ ‘My fiancée owes her beautiful colouring to her Scottish descent, a country which has many redhead... ...ps as children in your beautiful country, because am I not correct in thinking that Forsythe is a Scottish name?’ ‘Yes,’ said Helen, ‘I have my Scot... ...nterest, smiled at her in his impudent, mischievous manner and said, ‘For that I am doubly in my Scottish friend’s debt. Do you not agree, Comtesse?... ...s palace, that he should be their guest and she could still hear her words spoken in that rolling Scottish accent, ‘Now Gavin, laddie, you must be o... ...t who loved the opportunity to dress up - the difference, I suppose, between the Anglo Saxon and Scottish temperaments.’ ‘Your husband is the hands...

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Links and Factoids

By: Sam Vaknin

...ative State The term "vegetative state" (cortical death) was coined in 1972 by the Scottish neurosurgeon Bryan Jennett and the American neurologist... ...ons Iraq and Jordan were once one country under a united Hashemite throne. The two monarchs - Hussein of Jordan and Faisal II of Iraq - created a f... ...Fleming (1908-1964), the author of the James Bond 007 novels, was the grandson of a Scottish banker and the son of a Conservative MP (Member of Par... ...ress. The New York Times cites the case of a BBC producer in London who spoke in a Scottish - or, at any rate, foreign - accent. The impediment is ... ...ages in 1907. The idea to incorporated cathode -ray tubes was proposed in 1911 by a Scottish engineer, Campbell Swinton. Another Scot, John Log...

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Voices from the Past

By: Paul Alexander Bartlett

...n who is asking for alms: skirl of bagpipes. 393 n the Scottish coast the sunset prowled the lowtide combers, roll- ing cloud into... ...ves: “You talk in riddles, sir. Your plays ridicule us. You disesteem our monarchs, King Richard for one. Your plays attract the vulgar. You praise ... ...f the first play I saw, as a boy, performed by gypsies who told a tale of Scottish intrigue and murder that ended with the beautiful heroine’s suici...

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And Gulliver Returns Book IV : A Look at Our Human Values

By: Lemuel Gulliver XVI

...can‘t always have things their way because the majority rules. Hereditary monarchs tend to dislike this theory, but they, as other totalitarian leade... ...ioned iron-willed kings were never that popular with the peasants. Modern monarchs are not too bad but they cost a lot. Should the people pay million... ...―If you have a war, is it really a big deal if some people are killed? The Scottish philosopher David Hume said that the life of a man is no more imp... ...s. We don‘t want democratically elected presidents behaving like absolute monarchs or a judiciary functioning as a legislature. Your American balance...

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Marmion a Tale of Flodden Field

By: Sir Walter Scott

...hold me here a messenger, Your tender greetings prompt to bear; For to the Scottish court addressed, I journey at our King’s behest, And pray you, of ... ... Norham can find you guides enow; For here be some have pricked as far, On Scottish ground, as to Dunbar; Have drunk the monks of St. Bothan’s ale, An... ...ut ill may pursuivant, The only men that safe can ride Mine errands on the Scottish side: And though a bishop built this fort, Few holy brethren here ... ... thick at Christmas-tide, And we can neither hunt, nor ride A foray on the Scottish side. The vowed revenge of Bughtrig rude, May end in worse than lo... ...; The Palmer took on him the task, So he would march with morning tide, To Scottish court to be his guide. “But I have solemn vows to pay, And may not... ...ved to plead, lament, and sue - Suit lightly won and short-lived pain, For monarchs seldom sigh in vain. I said he joyed in banquet bower; But, ‘mi... ...g observed their meeting eyes With something like displeased surprise: For monarchs ill can rivals brook, E’en in a word or smile or look. Straight to...

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The Talisman

By: Sir Walter Scott

...rt the Bruce and of his son David. He was one of the chief of that band of Scottish chiv- alry who accompanied James, the Good Lord Douglas, on 6 The... ...Spain, and was killed there. Lockhart proceeded to the Holy Land with such Scottish knights as had escaped the fate of their leader and assisted for s... ..., and the Saracen matron testified so much haste to recover it as gave the Scottish knight a high idea of its value, when compared with gold or silver... ...ing the most romantic gasconades. The verb and the meaning are retained in Scottish.] I were wrong to chal- lenge, for the time, the privilege of thy ... ...to in Scripture—yawned fearfully on either side as they proceeded, and the Scottish knight was informed by the Emir that these were often the refuge o... ...hat of the well of Bethlehem, longed for by King David, one of its ancient monarchs, was then, as before, only obtained by the expenditure of blood. T... ...pardieux! This is smoothly said to soothe a sick man; but does a league of monarchs, an assemblage or nobles, a convocation of all the chivalry of Eur... ...ell advised that we came to expostulate, on the part of the Council of the Monarchs and Princes of the Crusade, against the risk of permitting an infi... ...ts from Eu- rope, what might we not hope to achieve, uncontrolled by these monarchs, whose dignity throws us at present into the shade—and, were they ...

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Two Penniless Princesses

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...en, the wind tossing her long chestnut-locks, uncovered, but tied with the Scottish snood, sat on the battle- ment, gazing far out over the waters, wi... ... of beauty and dignity. Her lips were crooning at intervals a mournful old Scottish tune, sometimes only humming, some- times uttering its melancholy ... ...iends, Malcolm is to study at the Paris University, and Davie to be in the Scottish Guards to learn chivalry like his father. And the Leddy of Glenusk... ...l likewise of original fancy and of that vein of poetry almost peculiar to Scottish women; and Jean was equally charming for all the sports in which s... ...h them, though he had much difficulty in en- forcing it, except with those Scottish knights and nobles who, like Sir Patrick Drummond, had served in F... ...ngs were always held to be free to enter anywhere, even far more dangerous monarchs than the pious Henry VI. Jean’s heart bounded up again, with a sen...

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A Child's History of England

By: Charles Dickens

...rit ain; succeeded to the throne of Wessex; con quered some of the other monarchs of the seven kingdoms; added their territories to his own; and, fo... ...d afterwards, where his sis ter, who was young and beautiful, married the Scottish King. Edgar himself was not important enough for anybody to care m... ... his head, he swore to govern the English as well as the best of their own monarchs. I dare say you think, as I do, that if we except the Great Alfred... ...ng away from Dover, where he happened to be), and went on to Lon don. The Scottish King, with whom many of the Northern English Lords had taken refug... ... Merton Abbey upon these conditions, and journeyed away to see his wife: a Scottish Princess who was then at St. Edmund’s Bury. Almost as soon as he h... ...ried to Margaret, King Edward’s sister. All their children being dead, the Scottish crown became the right of a young Princess only eight years old, t... ...Bor der land where England and Scotland joined. There, he called upon the Scottish gentlemen to meet him at the Castle of Norham, on the English side... ... important now that the King himself should be married; and divers foreign Monarchs, not very particular about the character of their son in law, prop...

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A Legend of Montrose

By: Sir Walter Scott

...g these ancient authorities, I must not forget the more modern sketch of a Scottish soldier of the old fashion, by a masterhand, in the character of L... ...ssess- ing many and powerful friends even north of the Forth and T ay,—the Scottish Convention of Estates saw no danger suf- ficient to induce them to... ... Charles and his subjects of Scotland had been carefully observed; but the Scottish rulers were well aware that this peace had been ex- torted from th... ...y a poor and discontented nobility, under whom it was officered chiefly by Scottish soldiers of fortune, who had served in the German wars until they ... ...s of his domination, had fired the train, by attempting to impose upon the Scottish people church ceremonies foreign to their habits and opinions. The... ...Dalgetty had it to boast, that he had sate with princes at feasts made for monarchs, and therefore was not a person to be brow-beat even by the dignit...

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Essays of Travel

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...modest. I knew I liked Mr. Jones from the moment I saw him. I thought him by his face to be Scottish; nor could his accent undeceive me. For as there ... ...ile with the fiddle, the accordion, and the songs of all nations. Good, bad, or indifferent—Scottish, English, Irish, Russian, German or Norse,—the so... ...th generous applause. Once or twice, a recita- tion, very spiritedly rendered in a powerful Scottish accent, varied the proceedings; and once we sough... ...didna gae doon,’ as she saw some one pass her with a chess-board on the holy day. Some sang Scottish psalms. Many went to service, and in true Scottis... ...d unconscious of his insensibility. The Irish husband, who sang his wife to sleep, and this Scottish girl serving her Orson, were the two bits of huma... ...of memorable men of yore. And this distinction is not only in virtue of the pastime of dead monarchs. Great events, great revolutions, great cycles in... ...anges and renews a weary spirit. Disappointed men, sick Francis Firsts and vanquished Grand Monarchs, time out of mind have come here for consola- tio...

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Waverley or Tis Sixty Years Since

By: Sir Walter Scott

...sisting of mighty cheeses and mightier ale, pheasants and venison, and the Scottish returns being vested in grouse, white hares, pick- led salmon, and... ...hom she probably deemed some- what susceptible, against the fascination of Scottish beauty. She allowed that the northern part of the island contained... ...their heritage, since the days of the gracious King Duncan. CHAPTER VIII A SCOTTISH MANOR-HOUSE SIXTY YEARS SINCE IT WAS ABOUT NOON when Captain W ave... ...been built at a period when castles were no longer necessary, and when the Scottish architects had not yet acquired the art of designing a domestic re... ...ovecot, or Columbarium, as the owner called it, was no small resource to a Scottish laird of that period, whose scanty rents were eked out by the cont... ...onferred upon distinguished houses in the Low Country by divers Scot- tish monarchs; nevertheless, such was their outrecuidance and presumption, as to... ...ice of the whole nation, justly forfeited his own. Since that period, four monarchs had reigned in peace and glory over Britain, sustaining and exalti...

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Redgauntlet

By: Sir Walter Scott

...d schemes were formed, as desperate as they were adventurous. Thus a young Scottishman of rank is said to have stooped so low as to plot the surprisal... ...s on the Law of Scotland Resolved and Answered,’ are works of authority in Scottish jurisprudence. As is generally the case, the doubts are held more ... ...ill of late years, every advocate who catered at the 15 Sir W alter Scott Scottish bar made a Latin address to the Court, faculty, and audience, in s... ... I know your good father would term this sinning my mer- cies, [A peculiar Scottish phrase expressive of ingratitude for the favours of Providence.] a... ... be, not my Apollo—quid tibi cum lyra?—but my Lord Stair, [Celebrated as a Scottish law- yer.] Meanwhile, I have written myself out of my melan- choly... ... indifferent, are now looking towards the line of our ancient and rightful monarchs, as the only refuge in the approaching storm—the rich are alarmed—...

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Guy Mannering

By: Sir Walter Scott

...ion, in the emphatic words, ‘Hang them a’!’ Unanimity is not required in a Scottish jury, so the verdict of guilty was returned. Jean was present, and... ...ed tempore Caroli primi was, says my authority, Sir Robert Douglas, in his Scottish Baronage (see the title Ellangowan), “a steady loyalist, and full ... ...was very gloomy. Equipt in a habit which mingled the national dress of the Scottish com- mon people with something of an Eastern costume, she spun a t... ...arly period, acknowledged as a separate and independent race by one of the Scottish monarchs, and that they were less favourably distinguished by a su... ...od, acknowledged as a separate and independent race by one of the Scottish monarchs, and that they were less favourably distinguished by a subsequent ... ...birth of time, —Scenes of Infancy. IN TRACING THE RISE and progress of the Scottish Maroon war, we must not omit to mention that years had rolled on, ...

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Ivanhoe

By: Sir Walter Scott

...dered as nourishing the most inveterate antipathy to their victor. All the monarchs of the Norman 5 Sir Walter Scott race had shown the most marked p... ... legs, and, ascending above the calf, left the knees bare, like those of a Scottish Highlander. T o make the jacket sit yet more close to the body, it... ...ell whether the Saxon war-cry was not heard as far within the ranks of the Scottish host as the cri de guerre of the boldest Norman baron. To the memo... ...ingsburgh, a personage, who, on account of his descent from the last Saxon monarchs of England, was held in the highest respect by all the Saxon nativ... ...other to the Empress of Germany, the daughter, the wife, and the mother of monarchs, was obliged, during her early residence for education in England,... ...possessed and prac- tised the medical science in all its branches, and the monarchs and powerful barons of the time frequently committed them- selves ... ...ce of Godfrey’s quali- ties should not be bound by the ordinary rules. The Scottish Nisbet, and the same Ferne, insist that the chiefs of the Cru- sad... ...ecclesiastics, but in lay impropriators of the church revenues, or, as the Scottish law- yers called them, titulars of the temporalities of the benefi... ...uld be devised to give an appearance of novelty to subsequent productions. Scottish manners, Scottish dialect, and Scottish characters of note, being ...

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In the South Seas

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...t have been in Europe; the moun- tain forms behind modelled in little from the Alps, and the forest which clustered on their ramparts a growth no more... ...s projection, and one of the 48 In The South Seas most agreeable verandahs in the tropics), a handful of whites of varying nationality, mostly French... ...own 49 Robert Louis Stevenson loses itself in a low wood of many species of acacia; and deep in the wood a ruinous wall encloses the cemetery of the ... ...tary, or at least for silent, inmates. Here it is that Mr. M’Callum, with a Shakespeare and a Burns, enjoys the society of the break- ers. His name an... ...ank rum behind a door. But there were others thoroughly consistent. I said the virtues of the race were bourgeois and puritan; and how bourgeois is th... ...ilt of coral; over against the mouth, by what seems an effect of landscape art, the martello-like islet of the gaol breaks the lagoon. Vassal chiefs w...

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The Prince and the Pauper

By: Mark Twain

...at ambassadors and their gorgeous trains, and listen to the affectionate messages they brought from illustri- ous monarchs who called him brother. O h... ...r steps. Within the seat of the throne is enclosed a rough flat rock—the stone of Scone—which many generations of Scottish kings sat on to be crowned,... ... Scottish kings sat on to be crowned, and so it in time became holy enough to answer a like purpose for En- glish monarchs. Both the throne and its fo...

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Ten Years Later

By: Alexandre Dumas

...ort a double weight?” “The weight was not so heavy when I was in peril,” in- terrupted the queen, with a sad smile, “and I ask no more for my husband ... ...With which you are at war—is it not so? Y ou will charge Broussel to report it. Enough, sir, enough. I understand you or rather, I am wrong. Go to the... ...one, “what do you think of this business, my dear count?” “Bad,” replied Athos, “very bad.” “But you received it with enthusiasm.” “As I shall ever re... ... I shall ever receive the defense of a great principle, my dear D’Herblay. Monarchs are only strong by the assis- tance of the aristocracy, but aristo... ...surrendered to the parlia- mentary troops, whilst Oxford and Newark still held out for him in the hopes of coming to some arrangement. At one of the e... ...romwell has arrived this night at Newcastle.” “Ah!” exclaimed the king, “to fight?” “No, sire, but to buy your majesty.” “What did you say?” “I said, ... ...all out your regiment,” said he; “I can foresee that we shall have need of it directly.” Winter turned his horse and the two friends rode on. It had t... ...by kings.” This was one of the humiliations which Mazarin made Anne undergo more frequently than any other, and one that bowed her head with shame. Qu...

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Essays of Michel de Montaigne Book the Third

By: William Carew Hazilitt

...ns puts this other fancy in my head: that it is a kind of pusillanimity in monarchs, and a testimony that they do not sufficiently understand themselv... ...; witness my CANNIBALS.—[Chapter XXX. of Book I.] Of the two most puissant monarchs of that world, and, peradventure, of this, kings of so many kings,... ...ontaigne ourselves of it. ’Tis not above a month ago that I read over, two Scottish authors contending upon this subject, of whom he who stands for th...

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Vanity Fair

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...s being over, she sang Te Deum. He was her Europe: her emperor: her allied monarchs and august prince regent. He was her sun and moon; and I believe s... ...d, and credit could supply. She chose that famous one in which the best of monarchs is represented in a frock-coat with a fur collar, and breeches and... ...e had read it in one of her favourite novel-books—Fatherless Fanny, or the Scottish Chiefs. “Suppose you were to run on and tell her,” the Major said....

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The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley

By: Thomas Hutchinson

...d—for I, not coy, Yield love for love, frank, warm, and true; And Burns, a Scottish peasant boy— _325 His errors prov... ...me serpent, that poor shadow, France, Cry peace, and that means death when monarchs speak. Ho, there! bring torches, sharpen those red stakes, _...

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Kenilworth

By: Sir Walter Scott

...candid Robertson himself confesses having felt the prejudices with which a Scottishman is tempted to regard the subject; and what so liberal a histori... ...et let him take care of me. I fly him now, as heretofore; but if, like the Scottish wild cattle, I am vexed by frequent pursuit, I may turn on him in ... ...present her? Such feats have been performed in the courts of as sharp-eyed monarchs as Queen Elizabeth.” “Utter madness, Varney,” answered the Earl; “...

...wever, pretend to have approached the task with the same feelings; for the candid Robertson himself confesses having felt the prejudices with which a Scottishman is tempted to regard the subject; and what so liberal a historian avows, a poor romance-writer dares not disown. But he hopes the influence of a prejudice, almost as natural to him as his native air, will not be f...

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Beauchamp's Career

By: George Meredith

...method of enraging him was to distin- guish one or other of them as Irish, Scottish, or Cambrian. He considered it a dismemberment of the country. And... ...eptable triangle, and eyes and mouth could be what she pleased for mice or monarchs. M. Livret did not gainsay the impeachment of her by a great Frenc...

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War and Peace

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

...ing me with a mild smile what I had learned and gained in the Prussian and Scottish lodges. I told him everything as best I could, and told him what I... ...h had been extraordinary. It had been a speech such as only constitutional monarchs deliver. “The Sovereign plainly said that the Council and Senate a... ...irs in a shabby dressing gown, copying out the original transaction of the Scottish lodge of Freemasons at a table in his low room cloudy with tobacco...

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Theological Essays and Other Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...ould allow himself to touch it without gloves, it is to be wished that our Scottish brethren would resign, together with ‘backslidings,’ to the use of... ...after as a man sows shall he reap.’ The objections are overwhelming to the Scottish use of the word; first, because already in Scotland it is a barbar... ...hin so short a period were born 87 Thomas de Quincey subterraneously,* in Scottish mines, or in the English collieries of Cumberland, and were suppos... ...ches of this Pariah popu- lation, the work (title I forget) of Mr. Bald, a Scottish engi- neer, well known and esteemed in Edinburgh and Glasgow. He m... ... is rather sullen, on a winter evening, to the eye. On the other hand, the Scottish coal or most of it, being far poorer as to heat, throws out a very... ... there arose that ‘fear of change’ which by authentic warrant ‘per- plexes monarchs.’ 106 Theological Essays and Other Papers – V olume One which, al...

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Considerations on Representative Government

By: John Stuart Mill

...ubled period of the Reformation also produced sev eral eminent hereditary monarchs—Elizabeth, Henri Quatre, Gustavus Adolphus; but they were mostly b... ...eral movement of the world. The same remark applies to the Welshman or the Scottish High lander as members of the British nation. Whatever really ten... ...nt for their own defense, are hemmed in on all sides by military or feudal monarchs, who hate and despise freedom even in a neigh bor, those states h... ... to do for its subjects all that could be done by a succession of absolute monarchs, guaranteed by irresistible force against the precariousness of te...

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The Poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

By: Samuel Taylor Coleridge

...nchanted nation, Like fiends embattled by a wizard’s wand, The Monarchs marched in evil day, And Britain joined the dire array;... ...cian, blind and grey, (Whom stretching from my nurse’s arms I kissed,) His Scottish tunes and warlike marches play, By moonshine, on the balmy summ... ...o clad in mail? Beneath his footsteps laurels spring; Him Earth’s majestic monarchs hail Their friend, their playmate! and his bold bright eye Com...

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Catherine : A Story

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...uburn, the golden ringlet of beauty, the red lock from the forehead of the Scottish or the Northern soldier, the snowy tress of extreme old age, the f... ...n the opposite bank rise the seven mountains robed in majestic purple, the monarchs of the royal scene. A pleasing poet, Lord Byron, in describing thi... ... my allies round about me. The high contracting Powers came to my bidding: monarchs from all parts of the earth; sover- eigns from the Moon and other ...

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A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

By: Henry David Thoreau

...ir, be fertile evermore, Ye rumored but untrodden shore, Princes and monarchs will contend Who first unto your land shall send, And pawn t... ...f herd’s grass and wild oats was spread Last year with nicer skill than monarchs use, A clover tuft is pillow for my head, And violets quite ... ... In the Saxon poetry extant, in the earliest English, and the contemporary Scottish poetry, there is less to remind the reader of the rudeness and vig...

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War and Peace

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

...ing me with a mild smile what I had learned and gained in the Prussian and Scottish lodges. I told him everything as best I could, and told him what I... ...h had been extraordinary. It had been a speech such as only constitutional monarchs deliver. “The Sovereign plainly said that the Council and Senate a... ...s in a shabby dressing gown, copying out the origi- nal transaction of the Scottish lodge of Freemasons at a table in his low room cloudy with tobacco... ...ll be safeguarded, since such is the will of the greatest and most just of monarchs. Soldiers and citizens, of whatever nation you may be, re-establis... ...dinary, su- perhuman capacities, or simply men of very various kinds, from monarchs to journalists, who lead the masses. In- stead of the former divin... ...ls who in his opinion have directed humanity (one historian considers only monarchs, generals, and ministers as being such men, while another includes... ...ersations made the nations happy or unhappy. Suddenly the diplomatists and monarchs nearly quarreled and were on the point of again ordering their arm...

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Jerusalem Delivered

By: Torquato Tasso

...th shine, And tidings sad of death and mischief brings To mighty lords, to monarchs, and to kings. LIII So shone the Pagan in bright armor clad, And r... ...battle eke with many a lowly word, Ralph, Rosimond, and Eberard request, A Scottish, an Irish, and an English lord, Whose lands the seas divide far fr...

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Jerusalem Delivered

By: Torquato Tasso

...th shine, And tidings sad of death and mischief brings To mighty lords, to monarchs, and to kings. LIII So shone the Pagan in bright armor clad, And r... ...battle eke with many a lowly word, Ralph, Rosimond, and Eberard request, A Scottish, an Irish, and an English lord, Whose lands the seas divide far fr...

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Master Francis Rabelais Five Books of the Lives, Heroic Deeds and Sayings of Gargantua and His Son Pantagruel

By: Thomas Urquhart

...elf from pecuniary embarrassments were unavailing. At the king’s death his Scottish loyalty caused him to side with those who opposed the Parliament. ... ...ore readily obeyed by everyone than the statutes of senates or commands of monarchs. Neither will he admit the least let or delay in his summons. You ...

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