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Their Journey Begins

By: K Meador; Cheryl Casey Ramirez, Illustrator

A prequel featuring individual short story vignettes of Greggory, Robert, Marissa, and Daniel before their lives converge in Journey to Freedom. Greggory is a half-breed; a mix of Indian and black blood, and struggles both emotionally and physically with hatred and prejudice. Robert is a slave on a Florida plantation who takes in the starving, angry young Greggory, under his wing and helps him grow into a man of honor. Marrissa is a young girl who watches her mother waste away working as a maid in the saloon. Dodging the advances of the owner and his threats to put her in service, Marrissa dreams of having a better life and strikes out on her own after her mother's death. Daniel is an introvert who finds safe haven away from civilization and his past. His business of trapping is successful and he finds contentment in the simple life he leads until he has two visitors. There are no spoilers in this book so it can be read before or after Journey to Freedom....

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The Air War in Southeast Asia : Case Studies of Selected Campaigns

By: Herman L. Gilster

Over the years many researchers have analyzed the political aspects of the air war in Southeast Asia. Their studies range from the original Pentagon Papers to those published more recently. Very little, however, focuses on the economic and operational aspects of the war. The purpose of this book is to fill that void by presenting a set of case studies that subject selected air campaigns during the Southeast Asia era to rigid economic analysis....

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Government Records : Results of a Search for Records Concerning the 1947 Crash Near Roswell, New Mexico

By: Richard Davis

General Accounting Office Report to the Honorable Steven H. Schiff, House of Representatives - Government Records - Results of a Search for Records Concerning the 1947 Crash Near Roswell, New Mexico...

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Kamehameha the Great

By: Julie Stewart Williams

This book is one of a series originally written by faculty in a Kamehameha reading program. The books were designed to increase students’ reading skills and their knowledge of Hawaiian history and culture by focusing on topics such as the Hawaiian monarchy. Some of these books have been translated from their original English into Hawaiian through the efforts of the staff of the Kamehameha Schools Hawaiian Studies Institute. We are pleased at the reception both the English and the Hawaiian editions have received from educational and general audiences....

Kamehameha was born in secret and buried in secret. In between he lived a very public life of action, courage, wisdom and justice. He brought together the smaller separate island chiefdoms, uniting them into one great Hawaiian nation. Under his later leadership people lived peaceful and productive lives. Kamehameha the Great was written to tell young readers about the first ruler of all Hawai?i. It is based upon traditional and historical sources including writings by people who lived at that time and oral histories handed down over the last two centuries. Many questions remain and historical debate continues concerning specific events of Kamehameha’s life. No one now or in the future will ever know all the true details. This version contains selected highlights of commonly accepted accounts portraying events and personal characteristics which helped Kamehameha become known as the greatest of all Hawaiians....

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The World Wide Military Command and Control System : Evolution and Effectiveness

By: David E. Pearson

PART I Conceptualization 1 Centralizing the Defense Establishment . . .3 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 2 Defense Communications Agency and System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 3 National Military Command System . . . . . 33 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 4 WWMCCS Is Born . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 5 Three WWMCCS Failures . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 PART II Formalization 6 WWMCCS Automatic Data Processing Upgrade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 7 Centralizing Communications Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .117 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 8 The WWMCCS Council and the Modern WWMCCS Structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 159 9 The WWMCCS Architect and Architecture 163 Notes . . . . ...

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History of Rapidan : Rapidan Communities

By: Dr. Alan James Shotwell

The history of a small town in central Virginia (1700s to 1900s) with bibliography and photographs

My grandmother used to tell me stories of the very small community I grew up in. My memory isn't as good as it shouold be so I wrote it all down. When I wanted to find our more about my home town, there was nothing written. so I set out to see if what she told me was true. The 50 year investigation (part time of course) and interviews with residents was intriguing. My family loves to tell stories. The stories I heard growing up brought to life several generations of residents of the community of Rapidan going all the way back to my great grandfather’s time. There were tales of the Civil War, the railroad, milling, flooding of the Rapidan River at twenty year intervals, and other Rapidan themes. In organizing this diversity of information, I have primarily attempted to give a history of the “community” of Rapidan, Virginia over time. I’ve also included information about another community by the same name, Rapidan, in Minnesota and stories told me by the crew of the USS Rapidan, a Navy oiler that served in World War II. Bear with me as I attempt to describe a kaleidoscope of folklore and stories presented as a narrative ove...

Chapter I. The Native Americans. The Native American communities near Rapidan were made of "long houses", woven stick huts covered with grass mats or tree bark. Native American women raised corn, squash and pumpkins and gathered several hundred varieties of nuts, berries and roots. The men hunted deer, wild turkeys, birds and woodland buffalo and got fish using trap lines and plant poisons. Local folklore says that the nearby community of Buena had a population of Native Americans who may have come from Wolftown. [Emma (Beeler) Strother by Pat Hurst 11,60] . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 5. Chapter II. The Settlers. In 1772 at the area known as Alexander Waugh's Ford, wagons camped along the river carrying goods between the Shenandoah valley and Fredericksburg. A miller, and land grantee, "Gentleman Billy" Willis, petitioned the English King, George III, to grant a tract of land on which to build a grist mill to grind feed for oxen and horses and to grind flour for the settlers. [The Orange Review centennial Edition, 1936 88] . . page 8. Chapter III. The Civ...

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History of Hart Park : 1890-1990, Kern County, California

By: Gilbert Peter Gia

The Bakersfield Californian objected to the barren site, and also to the twisting path from town - there were nearer and better camping places. Besides, it wrote, the “hot bend in the river" was no place to spend $20,000 of tax money. The Californian rallied the public to oppose the purchase, but the rival Bakersfield Morning Echo considered the old Barker property a fine place for a public park....

Park visitors were a diverse group. In May 1929, in late night and early morning hours, mixed-sex, nude bathing parties had been observed at the reservoir. Hart was incensed. He had labored to create a beautiful park for everyone, but he was prepared to protect it against criticism. He warned, "You can't quote me too strongly on this matter, I am going to have three deputy sheriffs on the lookout at the Kern River park, and if anyone, man or woman, is caught bathing in the lake at that time of the day or night without a bathing suit, he or she will be arrested. I don't care who these mixed couples are. I have given instructions they will be taken immediately and locked up in the county jail to await the due course of the law."...

One Hundred Years at the Park

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Kamehameha and His Warrior Kekuhaupi'O

By: Samuel M. Kamakau

Beginning with the traditional history of the great chief ‘Umi and ending with the death of Kamehameha III in 1854, this volume covers the rediscovery of the Hawaiian Islands by Captain James Cook, the consolidation of the Hawaiian Kingdom by Kamehameha I, the coming of the missionaries and the changes affecting the kingdom during the first half of the nineteenth century. Originally, this history was written by Kamakau in Hawaiian as a series of newspaper articles in the 1860s and 1870s. The English translation is primarily by Mary Kawena Pukui. It offers more than a record of past events. It presents a scholarly interpretation of those events by a Hawaiian historian writing for Hawaiians about their culture and disappearing customs. He lived at a time when access to first-hand information about the ancient culture was still available yet needed explanation because his Hawaiian audience was growing increasingly removed from its own cultural past. He wrote with a remarkable memory, a strong intellectual curiosity and a skill for turning a phrase. Samuel Manaiakalani Kamakau was born in 1815 on the island of O‘ahu and died in Honolu...

The first article, dated December 16, 1920, was entitled “A Tale of Kekuhaupi‘o, the Famous Warrior of the Era of Kamehameha the Great (Written for the readers of Ka Hoku o Hawaii). ” The serial initially focuses on the story of Kekuhaupi‘o, an exceptionally strong and skillful Hawaiian warrior from Ke‘ei, South Kona. As with most noted warriors, he was a master in the ways of battle strategy and in understanding human nature in his enemies and allies alike. Kekuhaupi‘o advocated the importance of continued training to be always prepared for battle. He believed in heeding the omens of the gods of ancient Hawai‘i—spirits from whom victory or defeat was thought to spring. Kekuhaupi‘o was well versed in the many disciplines of Hawaiian warfare, particularly that of lua (a bone-breaking form of wrestling), and a master in the use of weaponry....

The Young Kekuhaupi‘o. 1 -- A New Teacher. 3 -- The Ailolo Ceremony. 6 -- Luring the Niuhi Shark. 9 -- The Niuhi Shark: Methods of Capture. 11 -- Battling the Niuhi Shark. 13 -- Ailolo Offering and a Lua Contest. 15 -- Ikoi, the Tripping Club, and Delegate Kuhio. 18 -- Demonstrating Ikoi. 20 -- The Ikoi Contest and Return Home. 23 -- Birth of Kamehameha I. 25 -- Kekuhaupi‘o Becomes an Instructor. 28 -- Battle of Kalaeokailio, Kaupo. 30 -- Kalani‘opu‘u Again Takes War to Maui. 33 -- Kalani‘opu‘u Disregards his Kahuna. 35 -- Kekuhaupi‘o’s Adventure with Kamehameha on Maui. 38 -- Disaster at Kakanilua, Maui. 41 -- Slaughter on Maui. 44 -- Kiwala‘o Sent to Sue for Peace. 47 -- On Board Captain Cook’s Ship and the Thundering Cannon. 51 -- First Encounters with Europeans. 55 -- Kamehameha Sails with Cook. 59 -- Training for Battle in Kohala. 62 -- Kekuhaupi‘o Rebukes Kamehameha and Prepares for War. 65 -- Fighting at Hakalau. 68 -- Kekuhaupi‘o Kills Kaihe and Kamehameha Recalled to Kohala. 71 -- The Naha Stone. 75 -- Kamehameha Moves the Naha Stone. 79 -- Kalani‘opu‘u’s Bequests. 82 -- ‘Imakakoloa Sacrificed. 85 -- Kuka‘ilimoku Given to K...

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Hulili Vol. 3 No. 1 2006

By: Shawn Malia Kanaiaupuni, Ph. D.

A Hawaiian proverb says, “Ho ae ka ike heenalu i ka hokua o ka ale,” or “show your knowledge of surfing on the back of the wave. ” This saying suggests that talking about ones knowledge and skill is not enough; let it be proven (Olelo Noeau, 1013). As researchers, we like the process of discovery. We thrive on evidence. We design surveys and studies to find evidence that confirms our hunches. We want to test whether a certain theory is valid and meaningful. We want to identify relationships, show causality where possible, and grow and learn together from the growing evidence base of knowledge about our people. The 13 articles in Hulili Vol. 3 provide mounting evidence that Hawaiian perspectives matter, that Hawaiian language and knowledge systems are flourishing, and that Hawaiian identity and culture are central to Hawaiian well-being. From Hawaiian immersion classrooms in Keaau to creative writing workshops in Oregon, from the shorelines of Laie to the doctors office in Aotearoa, and from the courtrooms of Washington, DC to the puuhonua (place of refuge) in traditional Hawaii, these articles add to the evidence base tha...

This is the hour of our remembering, of our putting those parts of ourselves that have been dismembered and disenfranchised back together again. It is only from this place of wholeness, our holiness, that we can dream once more. And when we dream, let it be of a Hawaii where our people are healthy and vibrant, where we no longer kill ourselves with despair and abuse. Let us dream a Hawaii, as Dr. Manu Meyer says, “where our children are inspired to make knowledge joyful.” And let us dream a Hawaii where our land and her resources are loved and properly cared for....

The Hour of Remembering. 9 -- Elizabeth Kapuuwailani Lindsey-On Being Hawaiian. 19 -- Jonathan Osorio-Grounding Hawaiian Learners—and Teachers—-in Their Indigenous Identity. 27 -- Monica A. Kaimipono Kaiwi-Kaupapa Maori Research and Pakeha Social Science:-Epistemological Tensions in a Study of Maori Health. 41 -- Fiona Cram, Tim McCreanor, Linda Tuhiwai Smith,-Ray Nairn, and Wayne Johnstone-Civil Rights and Wrongs: Understanding Doe v. Kamehameha Schools. 69 -- Trisha Kehaulani Watson-Family and Society-The Roles of Family Obligation and Parenting Practices-in Explaining the Well-Being of Native Hawaiian Adolescents-Living in Poverty. 103 -- Barbara D. DeBaryshe, Sylvia Yuen,-Lana N. Nakamura, and Ivette Rodriguez Stern-The Application of Terror Management Theory to-Native Hawaiian Well-Being. 127 -- A. Kuulei Serna-Education-“For the Interest of the Hawaiians Themselves”:-Reclaiming the Benefits of Hawaiian-Medium Education. 153 -- William H. Wilson and Kauanoe Kamana-Makawalu: Standards, Curriculum, and Assessment-for Literature through an Indigenous Perspective. 183 -- Monica A. Kaimipono Kaiwi and Walter Kahumoku III-Malama na L...

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