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Virginia's 7th congressional district

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Virginia's 7th congressional district

Virginia's 7th congressional district
Virginia's 7th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Virginia's 7th congressional district - since January 3, 2013.
Current Representative Dave Brat (RGlen Allen)
Population (2010) 757,917
Median income $64,751
Ethnicity 74.3% White, 17.1% Black, 3.9% Asian, 4.9% Hispanic, 0.3% Native American, 2.1% other
Cook PVI R+10[1]

Virginia's 7th congressional district is a United States congressional district in the Commonwealth of Virginia. The district is currently represented by Republican Congressman Dave Brat, first elected in 2014.

Recent election results

Year Office Results
1996 President Dole 58 - 35%[2]
Senator Warner 59 - 41%[3]
Representative Bliley 75 - 20%[4]
1997 Governor Gilmore 64 - 34%[5]
Lieutenant Governor Hager 59 - 37%[6]
Attorney General Earley 66 - 34%[7]
1998 Representative Bliley 79 - 21%[8]
2000 President Bush 61 - 37%[9]
Senator Allen 61 - 38%[10]
Representative Cantor 76 - 24%[11]
2001 Governor Earley 55 - 44%[12]
Lieutenant Governor Katzen 52 - 47%
Attorney General Kilgore 70 - 30%
2002 Senator Warner 86 - 8 - 6%[13]
Representative Cantor 69 - 30%[14]
2004 President Bush 61 - 38%[15]
Representative Cantor 76 - 24%[16]
2006 Senator Allen 57 - 42%[17]
Representative Cantor 64 - 34%[18]
2005 Governor Kilgore 52 - 46%[19]
Lieutenant Governor Bolling 58 - 42%[20]
Attorney General McDonnell 58 - 42%[21]
2008 President McCain 53 - 46%[22]
Senator Warner 60 - 39%[23]
Representative Cantor 63 - 37%[24]
2009 Governor McDonnell 65 - 35%[25]
Lieutenant Governor Bolling 63 - 37%[26]
Attorney General Cuccinelli 65 - 35%[27]
2010 Representative Cantor 59 - 34%[28]
2012 President Romney 57 - 42%[29]
Senator Allen 55 - 45%[30]
Representative Cantor 58 - 41%[31]

Geography

The district stretches from the west end of Richmond and its suburbs in Henrico and portions of Chesterfield Counties, through Orange, Culpeper and northward to Page and Rappahannock Counties. Its current configuration dates from 1993, when Virginia was forced to create a majority-minority district by a Justice Department directive. At that time, most of Richmond, which had been entirely in the old 3rd District for over a century, was shifted to a newly created 3rd District. The remaining territory in the old 3rd was combined with some more rural areas to the north to form the new 7th District.

Prior to 1993, the 7th District stretched from the fringes of the Washington, D.C. suburbs to Charlottesville. It included the far northern portion of the Shenandoah Valley, as well as Manassas and Fredericksburg.

Demographics

According to the United States Census Bureau's 2010 data for the 111th Congress, the total population of the district is 757,917. Median age for the district is 39.2 years. 74.3% of the district is White, 17.1% Black, 3.9% Asian, 0.3% Native American or Alaskan, and 2.1% some other race with 4.9% Hispanic or Latino. Owner-occupied housing is 72.0% and renter-occupied housing is 28.0%.[32] The median value of single-family owner-occupied homes is $188,400.[33] 88.1% of the district population has at least a high school diploma, 36.7% at least a bachelor's degree or higher.[34] 9.9% of the district are civilian veterans. 12.7% are foreign born and 20.1% speak a language other than English at home.[35] 9.9% are of disability status.[36] 68.2% of the district is in the labor force, which consists of those 16 years and older. Mean travel time to work is 26.2 minutes. Median household income is $64,751. Per capita income is $33,628. 5.3% of the population account for families living below the poverty level, and 7.6% of individuals live below the poverty level.[37]

List of representatives

Representative Party Term Note
District created: March 4, 1789
John Page Anti-Administration March 4, 1789 –
March 3, 1793
Redistricted to Virginia's 12th congressional district
Abraham B. Venable Anti-Administration March 4, 1793 –
March 3, 1795
Retired
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1795 –
March 3, 1799
John Randolph Democratic-Republican March 4, 1799 –
March 3, 1803
Redistricted to Virginia's 15th congressional district
Joseph Lewis, Jr. Federalist March 4, 1803 –
March 3, 1813
Redistricted to Virginia's 8th congressional district
Hugh Caperton Federalist March 4, 1813 –
March 3, 1815
Lost re-election
Ballard Smith Democratic-Republican March 4, 1815 –
March 3, 1821
Lost re-election
William Smith Democratic-Republican March 4, 1821 –
March 3, 1823
Redistricted to Virginia's 21st congressional district
Jabez Leftwich Crawford Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
Lost re-election
Nathaniel Claiborne Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1835
Lost re-election
Anti-Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
Archibald Stuart Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1839
Lost re-election
William L. Goggin Whig March 4, 1839 –
March 3, 1843
Lost re-election
Henry A. Wise Democratic March 4, 1843 –
February 12, 1844
Resigned
Vacant February 13, 1844 –
May 5, 1844
Thomas H. Bayly Democratic May 6, 1844 –
March 3, 1853
Redistricted to Virginia's 1st congressional district
William Smith Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1861
Resigned
Vacant March 4, 1861 –
May 22, 1862
Charles H. Upton Unionist May 23, 1861 –
February 27, 1862
Election invalidated
Vacant February 28, 1862 –
February 15, 1863
Lewis McKenzie Unionist February 16, 1863 –
March 3, 1863
Retired
Vacant March 4, 1863 –
January 30, 1870
Civil War
Lewis McKenzie Conservative January 31, 1870 –
March 3, 1871
Lost re-election
Elliott M. Braxton Democratic March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
Lost re-election
John T. Harris Democratic March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1881
Retired
John Paul Readjuster March 4, 1881 –
September 5, 1883
Appointed U.S. District Court judge
Vacant September 6, 1883 –
May 4, 1884
Charles T. O'Ferrall Democratic May 5, 1884 –
December 28, 1893
Retired to run for Governor of Virginia
Vacant December 29, 1893 –
January 29, 1894
Special election
Smith S. Turner Democratic January 30, 1894 –
March 3, 1897
Retired
James Hay Democratic March 4, 1897 –
October 1, 1916
Appointed U.S. Claim Court judge
Vacant October 2, 1916 –
November 6, 1916
Thomas W. Harrison Democratic November 7, 1916 –
December 15, 1922
Election invalidated
John Paul, Jr. Republican December 15, 1922 –
March 3, 1923
Lost re-election
Thomas W. Harrison Democratic March 4, 1923 –
March 3, 1929
Lost re-election
Jacob A. Garber Republican March 4, 1929 –
March 3, 1931
Lost re-election
John W. Fishburne Democratic March 4, 1931 –
March 3, 1933
Retired
District eliminated March 4, 1933
District recreated: January 3, 1935
Absalom Willis Robertson Democratic January 3, 1935 –
November 5, 1946
Retired to run for U.S. Senate
Burr Harrison Democratic November 5, 1946 –
January 3, 1963
Retired
John O. Marsh, Jr. Democratic January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1971
Retired
J. Kenneth Robinson Republican January 3, 1971 –
January 3, 1985
Retired
D. French Slaughter, Jr. Republican January 3, 1985 –
November 5, 1991
Resigned
George F. Allen Republican November 5, 1991 –
January 3, 1993
Retired to run for Governor of Virginia
Thomas J. Bliley, Jr. Republican January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 2001
Retired
Eric Cantor Republican January 3, 2001 –
August 18, 2014
Resigned, having lost renomination
Vacant August 18, 2014 –
November 4, 2014
Dave Brat Republican November 4, 2014 –
Present
First elected to finish Cantor's term and also to the next term.

Historical district boundaries

2003 - 2013

See also

References

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  • Congressional Biographical Directory of the United States 1774–present


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