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Throat lozenge

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Title: Throat lozenge  
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Subject: Pastille, Strepsils, Halls (cough drop), Ricola, Fisherman's Friend
Collection: Confectionery, Dosage Forms, Drug Delivery Devices, Throat Lozenges
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Throat lozenge

Modern cough drops
Early 20th century "Frog In Your Throat" box

A throat lozenge (cough drop, troche, cachou, or cough sweet) is a small, typically medicated tablet intended to be dissolved slowly in the mouth to temporarily stop coughs and lubricate and soothe irritated tissues of the throat (usually due to a sore throat), possibly from the common cold or influenza. Cough tablets have taken the name lozenge, based on their original shape, a diamond.

Contents

  • Ingredients 1
  • History 2
  • Brands 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5
  • See also 6

Ingredients

Lozenges may contain benzocaine, an anaesthetic, or eucalyptus oil. Non-menthol throat lozenges generally use either zinc gluconate glycine or pectin as an oral demulcent. Several brands of throat lozenges contain dextromethorphan.

Still other varieties, such as Halls, contain menthol, peppermint oil and/or spearmint as their active ingredient(s). Honey lozenges are also available.

History

Candies to soothe the throat date back to 1000 BC in Egypt's Twentieth Dynasty, when they were made from honey flavored with citrus, herbs, and spices. In the 19th century, physicians discovered morphine and heroin, which suppress coughing at its source—the brain. Popular formulations of that era included Smith Brothers Cough Drops, first advertised in 1852, and Luden's, created in 1879. Concern over the risk of opioid dependence led to the development of alternative medications.[1]

Brands

References

  1. ^ Panati, Charles (1989). Panati's Extraordinary Origins of Everyday Things. New York: Harper & Row. pp. 258–260.  

External links

  • Ingredients of a throat lozenge, Health Canada

See also

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