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Suriname–United States relations

Surinamese–American relations
Map indicating locations of Suriname and USA

Suriname

United States

Suriname–United States relations are the bilateral relations between the Republic of Suriname and the United States of America.

According to the 2012 U.S. Global Leadership Report, 51% of Surinamese people approve of U.S. leadership, with 4% disapproving and 45% uncertain, the fifth-highest rating for any surveyed country in the Americas.[1]

Contents

  • History 1
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

History

Since the reestablishment of a cocaine through Suriname for repackaging and transport to Europe and the United States, and of ecstasy for transport to the United States. To assist Suriname in the fight against drugs and associated criminal activity, the U.S. has helped train Surinamese anti-drug squad personnel. The U.S. and Suriname also have significant partnerships in fighting trafficking in persons and money laundering.

Since 2000, the U.S. has donated a criminal records database to the police as well as computers, vehicles, and radio equipment. Projects through which the U.S. has supported the judicial system include case management and computer hardware donation. Along with training projects, these programs have led to a strong relationship with law enforcement entities in Suriname.

The U.S. Peace Corps in Suriname works with the Ministry of Regional Development and rural communities to encourage community development in Suriname's interior.

Suriname is densely forested, and increased interest in large-scale commercial logging and mining in Suriname's interior have raised environmental concerns. The ecotourism. On December 1, 2000, UNESCO designated the 16,000 square kilometre Central Suriname Nature Reserve as a World Heritage Site. Suriname's tourism sector remains a minor part of the economy, and tourist infrastructure is limited (in 2004, some 145,000 foreign tourists visited Suriname).

Suriname's efforts in recent years to liberalize economic policy created new possibilities for U.S. exports and investments. The U.S. remains one of Suriname's principal trading partners, largely due to ALCOA's longstanding investment in Suriname's bauxite mining and processing industry. Several U.S. corporations represented by Surinamese firms acting as dealers are active in Suriname, largely in the mining, consumer goods, and service sectors. Principal U.S. exports to Suriname include chemicals, vehicles, machine parts, meat, and wheat. U.S. consumer products are increasingly available through Suriname's many trading companies. Opportunities for U.S. exporters, service companies, and engineering firms will probably expand over the next decade.

Suriname is looking to U.S. and other foreign investors to assist in the commercial development of its vast natural resources and to help finance infrastructure improvements. Enactment of a new investment code and intellectual property rights protection legislation which would strengthen Suriname's attractiveness to investors has been discussed; the investment law was approved by the National Assembly and is currently being revised by the Ministry of Finance.

The U.S. maintains an embassy in Paramaribo.

See also

References

  1. ^ U.S. Global Leadership Project Report - 2012 Gallup

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the United States Department of State (Background Notes).[1]

External links

  • History of Suriname - U.S. relations
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