World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Stylobate

Article Id: WHEBN0000147962
Reproduction Date:

Title: Stylobate  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Apollo, List of ancient Greek and Roman monoliths, Ancient Greek architecture, Column, Delphi
Collection: Ancient Greek Architecture, Architectural Elements
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Stylobate

Triple-stepped crepidoma with stylobate at top, in the Doric Temple of Segesta, Sicily.
The Roman Maison Carrée, Nîmes, illustrating the Roman version of a stylobate.

In classical Greek architecture, a stylobate (Greek: στυλοβάτης) is the top step of the crepidoma, the stepped platform upon which colonnades of temple columns are placed (it is the floor of the temple). The platform was built on a leveling course that flattened out the ground immediately beneath the temple.

Some methodologies use the word stylobate to describe only the topmost step of the temple's base, while stereobate is used to describe the remaining steps of the platform beneath the stylobate and just above the leveling course. Others use the term to refer to the entire platform.

The stylobate was often designed to relate closely to the dimensions of other elements of the temple. In Greek Doric temples, the length and width of the stylobate were related, and in some early Doric temples the column height was one third the width of the stylobate. The Romans took a different approach in their interpretation of the Corinthian order, using a much loftier stylobate that was not graduated except in the approach to the portico.

References

  • Curl, James Stevens. "Stylobate." A Dictionary of Architecture and Landscape Architecture. Oxford University Press, 2006.
  • Lord, John. The Old Roman World. Kessinger Publishing, 2004.
  • Conway, Hazel and Roenisch, Rowan. Understanding Architecture. Routledge, 2006.
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.