Race war

A race war refers to hostilities between ethnic groups divided on the basis of racial group or other ethnic classification. The term may refer to specific violent acts or to general hostilities between ethnic groups. Some philosophers including Karl Pearson have offered social darwinism as an argument for race war.

World War II

In War Without Mercy, John W. Dower described World War II as a race war that "exposed raw prejudices and was fueled by racial pride, arrogance and rage on many sides."[1]

Helter Skelter

The murders perpetrated by Charles Manson and his "Family" were inspired in part by Manson's prediction of Helter Skelter, an apocalyptic race war.

Fictional scenarios

National Alliance) under the pseudonym "Andrew Macdonald".[2] The Turner Diaries depicts a violent revolution in the United States which leads to the overthrow of the United States federal government, nuclear war, and, ultimately, to a race war leading to the extermination of all Jews and non-whites.[3] The book was called "explicitly racist and anti-Semitic" by The New York Times and has been labeled the "bible of the racist right" by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Harold Covington wrote a series of Book novels called the Northwest Front in which white nationalists take over the Cascadia region, expel and kill "non whites" and race traitors, and establish a white nationalist ethnostate.

LeVar Burton published in 1997 a science fiction novel called Aftermath about a future civil war in the United States beginning about 2020 and evolving into a race war. The novel takes place in about the year 2025 and is about the aftermath of this war.

See also

References

  1. ^ Dower, John W. War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War (1986; Pantheon; ISBN 0-394-75172-8)
  2. ^ Salamon, Julie (2000-10-23). "TELEVISION REVIEW; The Web as Home for Racism and Hate".  
  3. ^ "Extremism: The Turner Diaries".  
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