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Palmyra, Virginia

Palmyra
Census-designated place (CDP)
Fluvanna County administrative and legal buildings in Palmyra
Fluvanna County administrative and legal buildings in Palmyra
Palmyra is located in Virginia
Palmyra
Location within the Commonwealth of Virginia
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Virginia
County Fluvanna
Population (2010)
 • Total 104
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)

Palmyra is a census-designated place (CDP) in and the county seat of Fluvanna County, Virginia, United States.[1] The population as of the 2010 Census was 104.[2] Palmyra lies on the eastern bank of the Rivanna River along U.S. Route 15. The greater Palmyra area (ZIP code 22963) is much more populous, and includes the Charlottesville exurb of Lake Monticello.

The Fluvanna County Courthouse Historic District, Glen Burnie, Pleasant Grove, and Seay's Chapel Methodist Church are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[3]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Climate 2
  • Notable residents 3
  • References 4

History

1912 street scene, showing L.O. Haden's general store

Before being named Palmyra, the area was owned by the Timberlake family, and Reverend Walter Timberlake started a business there in 1814 called "Palmyra Mills".[4]

The village of Palmyra was founded and became the county seat of Fluvanna County in 1828, and its historic courthouse was built in 1830-1831.[5] By 1835, there were fourteen homes, a church, three factories and various other businesses, though only two families owned all the land other than the public buildings.[4] In the mid-19th century, it was a stop along the stagecoach route between Richmond and Staunton.[6]The Virginia Air Line Railway, which operated from 1908 to 1975, ran through Palmyra. The train traveled from Strathmore on the James River, to Cohasset, to Carysbrook, to Palmyra, to Troy, and on to Gordonsville or Charlottesville.

A fire in 1930 destroyed many of the buildings on Main Street. As a result of the Great Depression, a smaller version of Palmyra was rebuilt after the fire.[4]

Climate

Palmyra's climate is characterized by relatively high temperatures and evenly distributed precipitation throughout the year. The Köppen Climate Classification subtype for this climate is "Cfa"(Humid Subtropical Climate).[7]

Climate data for Palmyra, Virginia
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 8
(47)
9
(49)
14
(58)
21
(69)
24
(75)
28
(83)
30
(86)
30
(86)
26
(79)
21
(69)
15
(59)
9
(49)
19.6
(67.4)
Average low °C (°F) −4
(25)
−3
(26)
0
(32)
5
(41)
10
(50)
16
(60)
18
(64)
17
(63)
13
(56)
6
(43)
1
(34)
−3
(27)
6.3
(43.4)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 74
(2.9)
71
(2.8)
91
(3.6)
74
(2.9)
94
(3.7)
89
(3.5)
104
(4.1)
100
(4)
86
(3.4)
94
(3.7)
79
(3.1)
80
(3)
1,036
(40.7)
Source: Weatherbase [8]

Notable residents

  • Texas Jack Omohundro (1846-1880) a notable frontier scout, actor, and cowboy was born on the Pleasure Hill farm in Palmyra.[9]
  • Chris Adler, from the band "Lamb of God"
  • Willie Adler, from the band "Lamb of God"
  • Chris Daughtry (American Idol, Daughtry) graduated from Fluvanna County High School in 1998. His parents still live there.

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  2. ^ Virginia Trend Report 2: State and Complete Places (Sub-state 2010 Census Data). Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed 2011-06-08.
  3. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places.  
  4. ^ a b c "Historic Palmyra Virginia" (PDF). Fluvanna County Historical Society. Retrieved 4 March 2014. 
  5. ^ "Fluvanna County History". County of Fluvanna, Virginia. Retrieved 4 March 2014. 
  6. ^ Smith, John Calvin (1847). The Illustrated Hand-book, a New Guide for travelers through the United States of America. New York City: Sherman & Smith. p. 132. 
  7. ^ Climate Summary for Palmyra, Virginia
  8. ^ "Weatherbase.com". Weatherbase. 2013.  Retrieved on August 20, 2013.
  9. ^ http://www.hmdb.org/marker.asp?marker=11676
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