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Netherlands women's national football team

Netherlands
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Oranje (Orange)
Leeuwinnen (Lionesses)[1]
Association Royal Dutch Football Association
(Koninklijke Nederlandse Voetbalbond)
Confederation UEFA (Europe)
Head coach Arjan van der Laan[2]
Captain Mandy van den Berg
Most caps Annemieke Kiesel (156)[3]
Top scorer Manon Melis (55)[4]
FIFA code NED
FIFA ranking
Current 12 (25 September 2015)[5]
Highest 11[5] (December 2014)
Lowest 20[5] (June 2008)
First international
 France 4–0 Netherlands 
(Hazebrouck, France; 17 April 1971)
Biggest win

 Netherlands 12–0 Israel 
(Zaandam, Netherlands; 22 August 1977)

 Netherlands 13–1 Macedonia 
(Zwolle, Netherlands; 28 October 2001)
Biggest defeat
 Sweden 7–0 Netherlands 
(Borås, Sweden; 26 September 1981)
World Cup
Appearances 1 (First in 2015)
Best result Round of 16 (2015)
European Championship
Appearances 2 (First in 2009)
Best result 3rd (2009)
Netherlands women's national football team in May 2014

The Netherlands women's national football team (Dutch: Nederlands vrouwenvoetbalelftal) represents the Netherlands in international women's association football and is directed by the Royal Dutch Football Association (KNVB), which is a member of UEFA.

In 1971, the team played the first women's international football match recognized by FIFA against France.[6] They have played at the final tournament of the 2009 and 2013 UEFA Women's Championship and reached third place in 2009. They have also played at the final tournament of the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup and reached thirteenth place.

The nicknames for the team are Oranje (Orange) and Leeuwinnen (Lionesses).[1] Arjan van der Laan is the team's coach, after being appointed on October 2015 as successor of Roger Reijners who stepped down.[2] Since March 2015, the team is ranked number 12 in the FIFA Women's World Rankings.

Contents

  • History 1
  • Tournament record 2
    • World Cup 2.1
    • European Championship 2.2
  • Current squad 3
  • Coaches 4
  • Overall official record 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

History

On 17 April 1971, the Dutch team played the first women's international football match recognized by FIFA against France.[7] The match took place in Hazebrouck, France and resulted in a 4-0 defeat for the Netherlands.

In 1980s and 1990s, the team failed to qualify for the final tournaments of UEFA's European Championship and later also for the FIFA's World Championship. The team qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2009 and reached third place together with Norway, after England (second place) and Germany (first place). This is the team's best result at an international tournament to date.[8] The team again qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2013, but did not advance after the group stage.

The team qualified for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup and reached thirteenth place, after having lost their first match in the knockout stage to Japan. As host country, the Dutch team has automatically qualified for the UEFA Women's Euro 2017. Despite of this, the women's team has not been noticed, since the men's was getting famous for 2014 FIFA World Cup's success, but the men's team's disastrous campaign of UEFA Euro 2016, by being eliminated from the qualification, has forced the Netherlands to take more notice on the women's team.

Tournament record

World Cup

On 27 November 2014, the Netherlands women's national football team qualified to the final tournament of the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time.[9]

Year Result Position Pld W D L GF GA
1991 Did Not Qualify
1995 Did Not Qualify
1999 Did Not Qualify
2003 Did Not Qualify
2007 Did Not Qualify
2011 Did Not Qualify
2015 Round of 16 13th 4 1 1 2 3 4
Total 1/7 - 4 1 1 2 3 4
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

European Championship

The Netherlands failed to qualify for the final tournament of the UEFA Women's Championship from 1984 to 2005. In 2009, the Dutch women's team qualified and reached third place, which is their best tournament result.[10] In 2013, they qualified again, but did not advance after the group stage.[11]

Year Result Matches Wins Draws* Losses GF GA
1984** Did not qualify
1987 Did not qualify
1989 Did not qualify
1991 Did not qualify
1993 Did not qualify
1995 Did not qualify
1997 Did not qualify
2001 Did not qualify
2005 Did not qualify
2009 Third place 5 2 1 2 6 5
2013 Group stage 3 0 1 2 0 2
2017 Qualified
Total 3/12 8 2 2 4 6 7
* Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.
** Missing flag indicates no host country.

Current squad

Squad for the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.[12]

Head coach: Roger Reijners

0#0 Pos. Player Date of birth (age) Caps Goals Club
1 1GK Loes Geurts (1986-01-12) 12 January 1986 103 0 Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC
2 3MF Desiree van Lunteren (1992-12-30) 30 December 1992 21 0 AFC Ajax
3 2DF Stefanie van der Gragt (1992-08-16) 16 August 1992 22 1 FC Twente
4 2DF Mandy van den Berg (c) (1990-08-26) 26 August 1990 57 3 LSK Kvinner FK
5 2DF Petra Hogewoning (1986-03-26) 26 March 1986 96 0 AFC Ajax
6 4FW Anouk Dekker (1986-11-15) 15 November 1986 38 5 FC Twente
7 4FW Manon Melis (1986-08-31) 31 August 1986 123 54 Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC
8 3MF Sherida Spitse (1990-05-29) 29 May 1990 104 15 LSK Kvinner FK
9 4FW Vivianne Miedema (1996-07-15) 15 July 1996 23 19 FC Bayern Munich
10 3MF Daniëlle van de Donk (1991-08-05) 5 August 1991 35 6 Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC
11 3MF Lieke Martens (1992-12-16) 16 December 1992 49 20 Kopparbergs/Göteborg FC
12 2DF Dyanne Bito (1981-08-10) 10 August 1981 146 6 Telstar
13 2DF Dominique Janssen (1995-01-17) 17 January 1995 6 0 Arsenal
14 3MF Anouk Hoogendijk (1985-05-06) 6 May 1985 101 9 AFC Ajax
15 3MF Merel van Dongen (1993-02-11) 11 February 1993 4 1 AFC Ajax
16 1GK Sari van Veenendaal (1990-04-03) 3 April 1990 13 0 Arsenal
17 3MF Tessel Middag (1992-12-23) 23 December 1992 24 3 AFC Ajax
18 2DF Maran van Erp (1990-12-03) 3 December 1990 1 0 PSV/FC Eindhoven
19 4FW Kirsten van de Ven (1985-05-11) 11 May 1985 82 16 FC Rosengård
20 3MF Jill Roord (1997-04-22) 22 April 1997 5 1 FC Twente
21 3MF Vanity Lewerissa (1991-04-01) 1 April 1991 4 0 PSV/FC Eindhoven
22 4FW Shanice van de Sanden (1992-10-02) 2 October 1992 15 3 FC Twente
23 1GK Angela Christ (1989-03-06) 6 March 1989 13 0 PSV/FC Eindhoven

Coaches

Overall official record

  • All results list the Netherlands goal tally first.
  • Goal scorers are sorted alphabetically.
Competition Stage Result Opponent Position Scorers
1984 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.4 2–3, 5–0 Belgium 2 / 4 Camper, Fortuin, de Haan, de Jong-Desaunois, Timisela, Timmer, de Visser
2–1, 0–2 Denmark de Bakker, Camper
2–2, 1–1 West Germany Camper, de Visser (2)
1987 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.3 1–0, 5–3 France 2 / 4 Allott (4), de Bakker, Camper
0–2, 2–0 Sweden de Bakker, Vestjens
3–1, 3–0 Belgium Allott (2), de Bakker, Boogerd, Timisela (2)
1989 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.2 0–0, 1–0 Sweden 1 / 4 de Bakker
4–0, w/o Scotland de Bakker (2), Glotzbach-Wiegman, Timisela
1–0, 2–0 Ireland de Bakker, Timisela, de Winter
Quarter-finals 1–2, 0–3 Norway de Bakker
1991 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.1 2–0, 0–0 Ireland 1 / 3 Vestjens (2)
6–0, 9–0 Northern Ireland Baal, de Bakker (6), Geeris, Limbeek (2), Pauw, Timisela (2), Vestjens, van Waarden
Quarter-finals 0–0, 0–1 (AET) Denmark
1993 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.5 3–0, 2–0 Greece 1 / 3 Geeris (3), Limbeek, Timisela
1–1, 0–0 Romania van der Ploeg
Quarter-finals 0–3, 0–3 Norway
1995 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.8 1–2, 0–1 Iceland 2 / 3 Leemans
2–0, 4–0 Greece van Dam (2), Keereweer, Limbeek, Noom, Roos
1997 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.2
(Class A)
0–2, 0–2 Iceland 4 / 4
1–1, 1–0 Russia Korbmacher, van Waarden
1–1, 1–2 France Korbmacher, Migchelsen
Relegation Play-off 2–1, 1–0 Czech Republic Glotzbach-Wiegman, Kiesel-Griffioen, Timisela
1999 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.3
(Class A)
1–6, 0–0 Norway 3 / 4 Roos
0–1, 2–1 England Noom (2)
1–0, 1–2 Germany Migchelsen, Noom
2001 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.1
(Class A)
1–1, 1–2 France 4 / 4 van Eyk, Smith
1–1, 1–2 Spain Kiesel-Griffioen, Smith
1–1, 0–3 Sweden Smith
Relegation Play-Off 3–0, 2–0 Hungary Kiesel-Griffioen, Muller, Noom, Torny (2)
2003 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.4
(Class A)
0–0, 1–4 England 3 / 4 Kiesel-Griffioen
0–3, 0–6 Germany
1–2, 4–1 Portugal Burger, Muller, Noom, Ran, Smith
2005 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.2
(Class A)
0–1 0–0 Spain 4 / 5
0–2, 0–2 Norway
0–3, 1–5 Denmark Ran
3–0, 3–0 Belgium de Boer, Koster, Melis, Muller, Torny, van Veen
2007 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.5
(Class A)
1–0, 0–2 France 3 / 5 de Boer
1–0, 4–0 Austria Delies, Demarteau, Louwaars, Smit (2)
0–1, 0–4 England
5–0, 4–0 Hungary Delies, Hoogendijk, Louwaars (2), Smit, Smith, Stevens (3)
2009 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.4 1–5, 0–1 Germany 2 / 5 Torny
2–2, 1–1 Switzerland van Eijk, Melis (2)
2–1, 1–0 Wales Melis (2), Smit
2–2, 3–0 Belgium Hoogendijk, Melis (3), Stevens
Play-Off 2–0, 2–0 Spain Stevens (3), van de Ven
2009 EC Group Stage: Gr.A 2–0 Ukraine 2 / 4 Stevens, van de Ven
1–2 Finland van de Ven
2–1 Denmark Melis, Smit
Quarter-finals 0–0 (PS: 5–4) France
Semifinals 1–2 England Pieëte
2011 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.1 0–3, 2–2 Norway 2 / 5 Dekker, Melis
13–1, 7–0 Macedonia Hoogendijk, Kiesel-Griffioen (4), Koster, Melis (2), Meulen, Pieëte, de Ridder, Slegers, Smit (7), Spitse
1–1, 4–0 Belarus Melis (2), de Ridder, Slegers, van de Ven
2–0, 1–0 Slovakia Kiesel-Griffioen, Koster, Smit
2013 EC QS Group Stage: Gr.6 6–0, 4–0 Serbia 2 / 5 van den Berg, van de Donk, Hoogendijk, Martens, Melis (6)
3–0, 2–0 Croatia Melis, de Ridder, Smit, Spitse, van de Ven
0–0, 0–1 England
2–0, 3–1 Slovenia Heuver, Melis, de Ridder, van de Ven (2)
2013 EC Group Stage: Gr.B 0–0 Germany 4 / 4
0–1 Norway
0–1 Iceland
2015 WC QS Group Stage: Gr.5 4–0, 10–1 Albania 2 / 6 Bakker, van den Heiligenberg, Martens (2), Melis (3), Slegers (6), + 1 o.g.
7–0, 3–2 Portugal van den Berg, Dekker, Miedema (6), Slegers (2)
1–2, 2–0 Norway Dekker, van de Donk, Miedema
7–0, 6–0 Greece Bakker, van den Berg (2), Martens (2), Melis (2), Miedema (4), Middag, Spitse
1–1, 2–0 Belgium Miedema (2), Slegers
Play-Off 2–1, 2–0 Scotland Martens (2), Melis (2)
Play-Off Final 1–1, 2–1 Italy Miedema (3)
2015 WC Group Stage: Gr.A 1–0 New Zealand 3 / 4 Martens
0–1 China
1–1 Canada van de Ven
Round of 16 1–2 Japan van de Ven

References

  1. ^ a b Women's football in the Netherlands, Royal Dutch Football Association. Retrieved on 1 July 2014.
  2. ^ a b c d "Van der Laan replaces Reijners as Dutch coach".  
  3. ^ "Van Praag riddert Kiesel-Griffioen" (in Dutch). onsoranje.nl. Retrieved 24 October 2015. 
  4. ^ "New Zealand and Netherlands clash for first World Cup win".  
  5. ^ a b c Netherlands: FIFA/Coca-Cola World Ranking, FIFA. Retrieved on 10 July 2015.
  6. ^ "The women's football World Cup is about to start. Here's the lowdown on the Oranje Lionesses - DutchNews.nl". Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  7. ^ "The women's football World Cup is about to start. Here's the lowdown on the Oranje Lionesses - DutchNews.nl". Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  8. ^ uefa.com. "UEFA Women's EURO 2009 - History - – UEFA.com". UEFA.com. Retrieved 2015-09-03. 
  9. ^ "Italy–Netherlands playoff match". UEFA. 27 November 2014. Retrieved 27 November 2014. 
  10. ^ UEFA Women's EURO 2009, UEFA. Retrieved on 1 July 2014.
  11. ^ Group B, UEFA. Retrieved on 1 July 2014.
  12. ^ 2015 World cup roster
  13. ^ (Dutch) "De loopbaan van Vera Pauw", Intermediair, 2009. Retrieved on 3 July 2014.
  14. ^ a b (Dutch) Hugo Logtenberg, "Roger Reijners nieuwe bondscoach vrouwenelftal", de Volkskrant, 2010. Retrieved on 3 July 2014.
  15. ^ (Dutch) Spelers en Staf: Vrouwen A-elftal, Ons Oranje. Retrieved on 2 July 2014.

External links

  • Media related to at Wikimedia Commons
  • Official website
  • FIFA profile
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