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Mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America

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Title: Mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America  
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Subject: Dance in the United States, Culture of the United States, Folklore of the United States, Emberá people, Indigenous peoples in Suriname
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Mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America

Coyote and Opossum appear in the stories of a number of tribes.

The mythologies of the indigenous peoples of North America comprise many bodies of traditional narratives associated with religion from a mythographical perspective. Indigenous North American belief systems include many sacred narratives. Such spiritual stories are deeply based in Nature and are rich with the symbolism of seasons, weather, plants, animals, earth, water, sky and fire. The principle of an all embracing, universal and omniscient Great Spirit, a connection to the Earth, diverse creation narratives and collective memories of ancient ancestors are common. Traditional worship practices are often a part of tribal gatherings with dance, rhythm, songs and trance (e.g. the sun dance).

Algonquian (northeastern US, Great Lakes)

From the full moon fell Nokomis - from The Story of Hiawatha, 1910

Plains Natives

  • Blackfoot mythology – A North American tribe or band who currently live in Alberta and Montana. Originally west of the Great Lakes in Montana and Alberta as participants in Plains Natives culture.
  • Crow mythology – A North American tribe who currently live in southeastern Montana. The shaman of the tribe was known as an Akbaalia ("healer").
  • Lakota mythology – A North American tribe originally located in The Dakotas, also known as the Sioux.
  • Pawnee mythology – A North American tribe originally located in Nebraska, United States.

Muskogean (Southeastern US) and Iroquois (Northeastern US)

Alaska and Canada

Northwestern US and Western Canada

Uto-Aztecan (Southwestern US and Mexico)

Other southwestern US

Central America

  • Aztec, an ancient Central American empire centered in the valley of Mexico
  • Mayan, an ancient Central American people of southern Mexico and northern Central America

South America

See also

Bibliography

External links

  • Apache Texts
  • Chiricahua and Mescalero Apache Texts
  • Jicarilla Apache Texts
  • "Midwest-Amazonian" Folklore-Mythological Parallels
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