Music of the Czech Republic

For Czech music prior to 1993, see Music of the Czech Lands.

The history of the music of the Czech Republic began with the founding of the Czech Republic in 1993.

Popular music

English-speaking visitors listening to Czech radio may be surprised at the prevalence of familiar tunes, but with lyrics sung in Czech. These imported pop standards aside, rock and roll has taken over, often with influences and instrumentations taken from more traditional Czech styles.

Lately, the Czech Republic has been a breeding ground for punk, punk rock and metal bands, some of which include brutal death, goregrind, black and similar styles of extreme metal.

The 1960s saw American bluegrass music gain wide popularity, and the first European festival was held in 1972 (the Annual Banjo Jamboree in Kopidlno). In 1964 and 1982, Pete Seeger toured the country, inspiring generations of Czech bluegrass and American-style folk musicians. One notable example is the band Poutníci, whose early success helped perpetuate bluegrass music in the Czech Republic. Many former members of Poutníci have recorded or toured with the band Druhá Tráva, which has brought Czech bluegrass to the modern world music stage.

Popular musicians

Military bands

The Central Band of the Army of the Czech Republic, the Military band of Olomouc and other military bands are part of the Czech Armed Forces.

References

  • Kolektiv autorů: Šumava příroda-historie-život, nakladatelství Miloš Uhlíř - Baset, Vydání první, 2003
  • Bužga J., Kouba J., Mikanová, E., Volek T. 1969:Průvodce po pramenech k dějinám hudby. Fondy a sbírky uložené v Čechách. Praha.
  • Jiránek J., Lébl V. 1972, 1981: Dějiny české hudební kultury 1890/1945. 1.díl 1890/1918, 2.díl 1918-1945. Praha.
  • Lébl V. a Kol. 1989: Hudba v českých dějinách. Od středověku do nové doby. Praha.
  • Pohanka J. 1958: Dějiny české hudby v příkladech. Praha.
  • Svatos, Thomas D. "Sovietizing Czechoslovak Music: The 'Hatchet-Man' Miroslav Barvík and his Speech The Composers Go with the People." Music and Politics Vol. IV/1 (2010): 1-35.

External links

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