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Michael Foot

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Michael Foot

Genus: Tylomelania
April 1976 |term_end2 = 10 November 1980 |predecessor2 = Edward Short |successor2 = Denis Healey |office3 = Shadow Leader of the House of Commons |term_start3 = 4 May 1979 |term_end3 = 8 December 1980 |leader3 = James Callaghan |preceded3 = Norman St John-Stevas |succeeded3 = John Silkin |office4 = Leader of the House of Commons |primeminister4 = James Callaghan |term_start4 = 8 April 1976 |term_end4 = 4 May 1979 |predecessor4 = Edward Short |successor4 = Norman St John-Stevas |office5 = Lord President of the Council |primeminister5 = James Callaghan |term_start5 = 8 April 1976 |term_end5 = 4 May 1979 |predecessor5 = Edward Short |successor5 = Christopher Soames |office6 = Secretary of State for Employment |primeminister6 = Harold Wilson |term_start6 = 5 March 1974 |term_end6 = 8 April 1976 |predecessor6 = William Whitelaw |successor6 = Albert Booth |office7 = Shadow Europe Minister |leader7 = Harold Wilson |term_start7 = 19 April 1972 |term_end7 = 5 March 1974 |predecessor7 = Peter Shore |successor7 = |office8 = Shadow Leader of the House of Commons |leader8 = Harold Wilson |term_start8 = 19 October 1971 |term_end8 = 19 April 1972 |predecessor8 = Fred Peart |successor8 = Edward Short |office9 = Member of Parliament
for arewell-michael-foot-atheist-champion-of-free-speech-and-idealistic-politician/ |title = Farewell Michael Foot, atheist, champion of free speech and idealistic politician |work= "The Freethinker" |date= 3 March 2010 |author= Barry Duke |accessdate= 15 September 2014}} }} Michael Mackintosh Foot, FRSL (23 July 1913 – 3 March 2010) was a British Labour Party politician and man of letters. He was a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1945 to 1955 and from 1960 until 1992. He was deputy leader of the Labour Party from 1976 to 1980, and later became the Leader of the Opposition from 1980 to 1983.[1]

Associated with the Labour left for most of his career, Foot was a supporter of the [[C

{{Infobox Officeholder |honorific-prefix = The Right Honourable |birthname = Michael Mackintosh Foot |honorific-suffix = FRSL |image = Michael Foot (1981).jpg |caption = Foot in 1981 |office = Leader of the Labour Party and Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition |primeminister = Margaret Thatcher |deputyleader = Denis Healey |term_start = 10 November 1980 |term_end = 2 October 1983 |predecessor = James Callaghan |successor = Neil Kinnock |office2 = Deputy Leader of the Labour Party |leader2 = James Callaghan |term_start2 = 5Blaenau Gwent |term_start9 = 9 June 1983 |term_end9 = 9 April 1992 |predecessor9 = Constituency created |successor9 = Llew Smith |office0 = Member of Parliament
for Ebbw Vale |term_start0 = 17 November 1960 |term_end0 = 9 June 1983 |predecessor0 = Aneurin Bevan |successor0 = Constituency abolished |office11 = Member of Parliament
for Plymouth Devonport |term_start11 = 5 July 1945 |term_end11 = 26 May 1955 |predecessor11 = Leslie Hore-Belisha |successor11 = Joan Vickers |birth_date = (1913-07-23)23 July 1913 |birth_place = Plymouth, Devon, England |death_date = 3 March 2010(2010-03-03) (aged 96) |death_place = Hampstead, London, England |party = Labour |spouse = Jill Craigie (m. 1949–1999, her death) |relations = Isaac Foot (father)
Arthur Foot (brother) |alma_mater = Wadham College, Oxford |religion = None[3]

Foot's parallel career as a journalist included appointments as editor of Tribune, on several occasions, and the Evening Standard newspaper. Among the books he authored are Guilty Men (an attack on Neville Chamberlain and others for
The Right Honourable
Michael Foot
FRSL
Foot in 1981
Leader of the Labour Party and Her Majesty's Most Loyal Opposition
In office
10 November 1980 – 2 October 1983
Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher
Preceded by James Callaghan
Succeeded by Neil Kinnock
Deputy Leader of the Labour Party
In office
5 April 1976 – 10 November 1980
Leader James Callaghan
Preceded by Edward Short
Succeeded by Denis Healey
Shadow Leader of the House of Commons
In office
4 May 1979 – 8 December 1980
Leader James Callaghan
Preceded by Norman St John-Stevas
Succeeded by John Silkin
Leader of the House of Commons
In office
8 April 1976 – 4 May 1979
Prime Minister James Callaghan
Preceded by Edward Short
Succeeded by Norman St John-Stevas
Lord President of the Council
In office
8 April 1976 – 4 May 1979
Prime Minister James Callaghan
Preceded by Edward Short
Succeeded by Christopher Soames
Secretary of State for Employment
In office
5 March 1974 – 8 April 1976
Prime Minister Harold Wilson
Preceded by William Whitelaw
Succeeded by Albert Booth
Shadow Europe Minister
In office
19 April 1972 – 5 March 1974
Leader Harold Wilson
Preceded by Peter Shore
Shadow Leader of the House of Commons
In office
19 October 1971 – 19 April 1972
Leader Harold Wilson
Preceded by Fred Peart
Succeeded by Edward Short
Member of Parliament
for Blaenau Gwent
In office
9 June 1983 – 9 April 1992
Preceded by Constituency created
Succeeded by Llew Smith
Member of Parliament
for Ebbw Vale
In office
17 November 1960 – 9 June 1983
Preceded by Aneurin Bevan
Succeeded by Constituency abolished
Member of Parliament
for Plymouth Devonport
In office
5 July 1945 – 26 May 1955
Preceded by Leslie Hore-Belisha
Succeeded by Joan Vickers
Personal details
Born Michael Mackintosh Foot
(1913-07-23)23 July 1913
Plymouth, Devon, England
Died 3 March 2010(2010-03-03) (aged 96)
Hampstead, London, England
Political party Labour
Spouse(s) Jill Craigie (m. 1949–1999, her death)
Relations Isaac Foot (father)
Arthur Foot (brother)
Alma mater Wadham College, Oxford
Religion None[4]

Michael Mackintosh Foot, FRSL (23 July 1913 – 3 March 2010) was a British Labour Party politician and man of letters. He was a Member of Parliament (MP) from 1945 to 1955 and from 1960 until 1992. He was deputy leader of the Labour Party from 1976 to 1980, and later became the Leader of the Opposition from 1980 to 1983.[5]

Associated with the Labour left for most of his career, Foot was a supporter of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and British withdrawal from the European Economic Community. His first Cabinet appointment was as Employment Secretary under Harold Wilson in 1974, and later served as Leader of the House of Commons under James Callaghan. A passionate orator, he was Labour leader at the 1983 general election when the party obtained its lowest share of the vote at a general election since 1918 and the fewest parliamentary seats it had had at any time since before the 1945 general election.[6]

Foot's parallel career as a journalist included appointments as editor of Tribune, on several occasions, and the Evening Standard newspaper. Among the books he authored are Guilty Men (an attack on Neville Chamberlain and others for the policy of appeasement), a biography of Jonathan Swift (The Pen and the Sword, 1957) and a biography of Aneurin Bevan.

Family

Foot was born in Lipson Terrace, Plymouth, Devon, the fifth of seven children of Isaac Foot (1880–1960) and Eva[7] (née Mackintosh, died 17 May 1946), a Scotswoman.[8] Isaac Foot was a solicitor and founder of the Plymouth law firm Foot and Bowden (which merged with another firm to become Foot Anstey). Isaac Foot was an active member of the Liberal Party and was Liberal Member of Parliament for Bodmin in Cornwall 1922–1924 and 1929–1935 and a Lord Mayor of Plymouth.Tylomelania

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