World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Louis Beam

Article Id: WHEBN0004496864
Reproduction Date:

Title: Louis Beam  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: White separatism, Front Comtois, Kevin Lamb, Voorpost, Redneck Shop
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Louis Beam

Louis Beam (born 1946) is an American white nationalist. After high-school, he served as a helicopter door-gunner in Vietnam.[1] He was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.[2] Back in the U.S. he became a Klansman, leading a maritime[3] Louisiana KKK element against government help to Vietnamese immigrant fishermen.[4] He became active with Aryan Nations in the early 1980s.[5] He is considered to be the first important proponent of the strategy of leaderless resistance.[6] In recent years, Beam has maintained a significantly lower profile.

According to ADL/LEARN, he has been fighting against a government he views as "tyrannical and controlled by Jewish conspirators" for more than thirty years. He first became engaged on the far right as a paramilitary Klansman, later with ties to Christian Identity groups. He cites Thomas Jefferson in resistance to tyranny. Beam refused Aryan Nation's head Richard Girnt Butler's offer of leadership of the religious group in 1988 and chose to continue to work alone. During the past twenty years, he has had limited influence except for rare postings on the internet. His essay Leaderless Resistance has been translated into seven languages.

References

  1. ^ Gardell, Mattias (2003). Gods of the blood: the pagan revival and white separatism.  
  2. ^ Southern Poverty Law Center Intelligence Report Summer 2002 http://www.splcenter.org/intel/intelreport/article.jsp?aid=86
  3. ^ Dees M. & Corcoran J. Gathering Storm: America's Militia Threat (1997) photo with caption
  4. ^ Wade, Wyn Craig (1998). The fiery cross: the Ku Klux Klan in America.  
  5. ^ Goodrick-Clarke, Nicholas (2003). Black Sun: Aryan Cults, Esoteric Nazism, and the Politics of Identity.  
  6. ^ Laqueur, Walter (2000). The New Terrorism: Fanaticism and the Arms of Mass Destruction.  

External links

  • Entry with the ADL/LEARN
  • Louisbeam.com - Essays by Louis Beam
  • Essays by a klansman : being a compendium of Ku Klux Klan ideology, organizational methods, history, tactics, and opinions, with interpolations by the author
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.