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Lockheed Saturn

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Lockheed Saturn

Model 75 Saturn
Role Airliner
National origin United States of America
Manufacturer Lockheed Corporation
First flight June 17, 1946
Status Prototype only
Number built 2

The Lockheed Model 75 Saturn was a small feeder airliner produced by the Lockheed Corporation in the mid-1940s. The design team, led by Don Palmer, created a high-wing, twin-engine monoplane with 14 seats and a top speed of 228 mph (367 km/h). Lockheed touted the Saturn as an airliner to service small towns with limited airport facilities and could take on passengers and cargo without ramps or stairs.[1]

Tony LeVier piloted the first flight on June 17, 1947. Lockheed had received 500 conditional orders for this aircraft, priced at $85,000 each. But, by the time the design was completed, the selling price had risen to $100,000 and these orders had been cancelled, with war surplus C-47s filling the same market at a quarter the price. Lockheed lost $6 million from the development of the two prototypes, which were scrapped in 1948.

Specifications

Data from Lockheed Aircraft since 1913 [2]

General characteristics
  • Crew: Two
  • Capacity: 14 passengers
  • Length: 56 ft 6 in (15.69 m)
  • Wingspan: 74 ft 0 in (22.56 m)
  • Height: 19 ft 10 in (6.05 m)
  • Wing area: 502 ft² (46.6 m²)
  • Empty weight: 11,361 lb (5,153 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 16,000 lb (7,257 kg)
  • Powerplant: 2 × Wright 744C-7BA-1 seven cylinder radial engine, 700 hp (522 kW) each

Performance

References

Notes
  1. ^ "Pinup - Lockheed Saturn", January 1946, Popular Science bottom of page 96 with good photo on following page
  2. ^ Francillon 1978, p.281.
Bibliography
  • Boyne, Walter J., Beyond the Horizons: The Lockheed Story. St. Martin's Press: New York, 1998.
  • Francillon, René J. Lockheed Aircraft since 1913. London:Putnam, 1982. ISBN 0-370-30329-6
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