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List of human deities

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List of human deities

For deities of human religions outside the Dungeons & Dragons universe, see Category:Lists of deities.

This is a list of human deities in the Dungeons & Dragons universe.

Greyhawk

Al'Akbar

In the World of Greyhawk campaign setting, Al'Akbar is the Baklunish demigod of dignity, duty, faithfulness, and guardianship.[1]

Azor'alq

Azor'alq is the Baklunish hero-deity of light, purity, courage, and strength from the Greyhawk campaign setting.[1]

Forgotten Realms

Amaunator

Amaunator
Game background
Title(s) The Yellow God, The Keeper of the Eternal Sun, Keeper of Law
Home plane Keep of the Eternal Sun (Mechanus)
Power level Greater deity
Alignment Lawful Neutral
Portfolio Bureaucracy, contracts, law, order, the sun, rulership
Domains Law, Nobility, Planning, Sun, Time
Superior None
Design details

Amaunator is a fictional Dungeons & Dragons campaign setting devised by Ed Greenwood. An ancient Netherese deity of order and the sun, Amaunator was also revered as the patron of law and time. Amaunator appeared as a lanky man with silver-white hair, a short, week-long growth of white beard, and skin that glowed with a quiet golden radiance. His symbol is a sun with a face on the solar disk. He was long considered to be a dead deity, but was revealed to be Lathander in the 4th edition Forgotten Realms campaign setting.

At'ar the Merciless, the "Yellow Goddess," is introduced in the Anauroch supplement. She is described as chief among the Bedine gods, and to them she is the sun, and seen as a spiteful, faithless woman who tends to ignore the Bedine completely. The book reveals that in the days ancient Netheril, "At'ar" was called "Amaunator", and was the male sun deity.[2] Amaunator was later described fully in Faiths & Avatars (1996),[3] and his role in the ancient history of the Realms was detailed in Netheril: Empire of Magic (1996).[4] His role in the cosmology of the Planescape campaign setting was described in On Hallowed Ground (1996).[5] Amaunator and his continued worship was discussed in Lost Empires of Faerûn (2005).[6]

In the 4th edition Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide, Amauntator returns. In the chaos following Shar restored Netheril, which prompted the revelation that Amaunator did not die, but rather, became Lathander. Amaunator has reclaimed his full suite of powers and his original mission, effectively ending Lathander's stint as a deity. He fondly remembers his time as Lathander, however, and encourages some of his clergy, the Morninglords, to keep Lathander's message of hope and optimism alive. Although he was originally a Netherese deity, Amaunator has inherited Lathander's church and is worshipped all over Faerun - ironically, he, like Selune, is now despised in Netheril itself, as that nation worships Shar exclusively.[7] Amaunator took Mystra's place as the timekeeper of the gods. As a Greater God, Amaunator rules the astral dominion, Eternal Sun, from the Palace of the Four Suns. He is assisted by his exarch Siamorphe and his associate Waukeen. Although originally Lawful Neutral, Amaunator's time as Lathander has changed his worldview to the extent he is now Lawful Good.[8]

Auril

Auril
Game background
Title(s) Frostmaiden
Icedawn
The Cold Goddess
Home plane 2E: Winter's Hall (Pandemonium)
3E: Fury's Heart
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Neutral Evil
Portfolio Cold, Ice, Winter
Superior Talos
Design details

Auril ( ),[9] the Frostmaiden, is the goddess of cold and winter in the Silvanus, the dominion's ruler, although Auril does not consider herself accountable to the greater god.

Demihuman Deities (1998).[17]


Auril appears as one of the major deities of the Forgotten Realms setting again, in Forgotten Realms Campaign Setting (2001),[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19] Auril is one of the deities described as appropriate for a cold-based campaign in Frostburn (2004).

Azuth

Azuth
Game background
Title(s) The High One
Patron of Mages
Lord of Spells
Home plane 2E: Azuth (Arcadia)
3E: Dweomerheart
Power level Lesser
Alignment Lawful Neutral
Portfolio Wizards, Mages, Spellcasters in general, Monks (Shining Hand)
Domains Illusion, Knowledge, Magic, Law, Spell
Superior Mystra
Design details

Azuth ( )[9] is a fictional Time of Troubles in 1358DR he spent much of his time caring for part of Mystra's power and guarding a statue of her at the Pool of Yeven in Battledale.

[9]

Azuth was described in the hardback Asmodeus consumed his essence to become a fully-fledged god.

Beshaba

Beshaba
Game background
Title(s) The Maid of Misfortune, Lady Doom
Home plane 2E: Blood Tor (Abyss, layer 13)
3E: Barrens of Doom and Despair
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Portfolio Random mischief, misfortune, bad luck, accidents
Design details

Beshaba ( [9]), also called The Maid of the Misfortune, is the

[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19] In Baldur's Gate 2: Shadows of Amn, a mob in the Government District of Athkatla is preparing to burn Viconia, a runaway drow elf, as a sacrifice to Beshaba. This is most likely due to the mob wanting to dissuade the misfortune of a drow invasion on the city.

Chauntea

Chauntea
Game background
Title(s) The Great Mother, the Grain Goddess, Earthmother
Home plane 2E: Great Mother's Garden (Elysium)
3E:
Power level Greater
Alignment Neutral Good
Portfolio Agriculture, plants cultivated by humans, farmers, gardeners, summer
Domains Animal, Earth, Good, Plant, Protection, Renewal
Design details

Chauntea ( ),[9] The Grain Goddess, The Great Mother or Earthmother, is a fictional Silvanus, who is considered the god of wild nature, whilst Chauntea herself is seen as being the embodiment of all things agrarian or agricultural. She is goddess of agriculture, plants cultivated by humans, farmers, gardeners, and summer.

Deneir
Game background
Title(s) Lord of All Glyphs and Images
The Scribe of Oghma
Home plane 2E: Library of All Knowledge (Beastlands)
3E: House of Knowledge
Power level Lesser
Alignment Neutral Good
Portfolio Literature, Art, Knowledge, Glyphs, Images, Cartography, Scholars
Superior Oghma
Design details

Deneir ( )[9] is a fictional minor campaign setting of the Dungeons and Dragons fantasy role-playing game.

[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19]

Gargauth

Gargauth
Game background
Title(s) The Tenth Lord of Nine
The Lost Lord of the Pit
The Hidden Lord
Home plane Material Plane
Power level Demipower/Archdevil
Alignment Lawful Evil
Portfolio Betrayal, cruelty, political corruption, powerbrokers
Design details

Gargauth is a fictional campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy roleplaying game. He is the deity of betrayal, cruelty, political corruption and powerbrokers.

Gargauth first appeared in 1984 in [30] and was further described in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[31]

Eshowdow

Eshowdow
Game background
Title(s) The Shadow Giant
Devourer of Honor, Courage and Nobility
Betrayer of the Eshowe
Ravager of the Tabaxi
Home plane Material Plane
Power level Demipower (Dead)
Alignment Chaotic Evil
Portfolio Shadows, destruction, revenge, cowardice, ignominy, fear[32]
Superior None
Design details

Eshowdow is a fictional god in the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. Eshowdow was born out of a fragment of the consciousness and being of Ubtao when he created the myriad nature spirits of Chult from such pieces of himself. His name came from the Eshowe tribe, who freed the entity they called the Shadow Giant, hoping to destroy the city of Mezro. When the Shadow Giant was repelled from the city by the Tabaxi People, he turned on his summoners, nearly wiping them out. Thus, the victorious Tabaxi named him Eshowdow, "the Shadow of the Eshowe".

This entity is first described as a "shadow giant" in the 2nd edition book Shar in uncertain circumstances.[34]

Gond

Gond
Game background
Title(s) Wonderbringer, Lord of All Smiths
Home plane 2E: Wonderhome (Outlands)
3E: Home of Knowledge
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Neutral
Portfolio Artifice, craft, construction, smithwork
Superior Oghma
Design details

Gond is a Lantan, the center being at a monastery in the city of Illul called the High Holy Crafthouse of Inspiration. The church of Gond is tolerated across Faerûn.

[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[36]

Helm

Helm
Game background
Title(s) The Watcher, the Vigilant One
Home plane 2E: Everwatch (Mechanus)
3E: House of the Triad
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Lawful Neutral
Portfolio Law, Planning, Protection, and Strength
Superior Lord Ao
Design details

Helm ( ),[9] The Watcher, is a campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game. He is the God of guardians, protection and protectors, and worshiped by guards and paladins. His symbol is a staring eye with blue iris on an upright war gauntlet, his divine realm is Everwatch in the House of the Triad, and his 3.5 Edition D&D domains are Law, Planning, Protection, and Strength.

[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19]

According to Baldur's Gate II: Throne of Bhaal a major quest is offered to the player if their character class is 'Priest of Helm'. In Baldur's Gate: Dark Alliance II one of the playable characters, Allessia Faithhammer, is a human cleric of Helm. In Neverwinter Nights towards the end of the first chapter, the player must battle through Helm's Hold, where the Cult of the Eye has slaughtered all the followers of Helm and suppressed the guardian spirit with a demon. The player has the option of destroying the demon and resummoning the guardian spirit of Helm. In Strahd's Possession, after completing the main quest, the player's party is summoned before Helm for a hearty thank you.

Ilmater

Ilmater
Game background
Title(s) The Crying God, the Broken God
Home plane 2E: Martyrdomain (Bytopia)
3E: House of the Triad
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Lawful Good
Portfolio Endurance, suffering, martyrdom, perseverance
Domains Good, Healing, Law, Strength
Superior Tyr
Design details

Ilmater ( )[9] is a campaign setting of the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game.

[18] and is further detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[19]

Ibrandul

Ibrandul
Game background
Home plane 2E: Ibrandyllaran (Pandemonium)
Power level Dead
Alignment Chaotic Neutral
Portfolio Caverns, dungeons, skulks
Domains Cavern, Darkness, Scalykind, Travel
Design details

Within the Shar has been known to impersonate Ibrandul, subverting Ibranduls' followers for her own dark deeds.

Ibrandul is first mentioned in the 2nd edition boxed Demihuman Deities (1998).[17] Ibrandul's ongoing worship is described in Lost Empires of Faerûn (2005).[40]

Iyachtu Xvim

Iyachtu Xvim
Game background
Title(s) The Godson, The Son of Bane, The New Darkness
Home plane Bastion of Hate (Gehenna, Chamada)
Power level Lesser
Alignment Lawful Evil
Portfolio Fear, Hatred, Tyranny
Superior Bane
Design details

In the Faerûnian Pantheon, Cyric. In Tymora's Luck, Xvim impersonated Sirrion in a bid to seize the portfolios of Tymora and Beshaba, when Lathander attempted to re-create Tyche by reuniting the two goddesses. (Tyche became Tymora and Beshaba after becoming corrupted by Moander during the Dawn Cataclysm.) His plan was foiled by Finder Wyvernspur and his priest Joel, who threw the two halves of the Finder's Stone into the fusion chamber. Xvim fled, but his realm, the Bastion of Hate, was already destroyed by Beshaba.[41] Then, on Midwinter night of 1372 DR, the young god was consumed by a blazing green fire, from which emerged a resurrected Bane.

Iyachtu Xvim was first described in the Forgotten Realms Campaign Set's "Cyclopedia of the Realms" booklet (1987), which states that he "is called "the Godson" and the son of Bane, and serves as Bane's instrument in the Realms, directly carrying out his "father's" will".[42] Iyachtu Xvim is fully detailed in [18]

References

  1. ^ a b Conforti, Steven, ed. Living Greyhawk Official Listing of Deities for Use in the Campaign, version 2.0. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2005. Available online:[1] Archived June 5, 2013 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Greenwood, Ed. Anauroch (TSR, 1991)
  3. ^ Martin, Julia, and Eric L Boyd. Faiths & Avatars (TSR, 1996)
  4. ^ Slade and Jim Butler. Netheril: Empire of Magic (TSR, 1996)
  5. ^ a b c d e f McComb, Colin. On Hallowed Ground (TSR, 1996)
  6. ^ Baker, Richard, Ed Bonny, and Travis Stout. Lost Empires of Faerûn (Wizards of the Coast, 2005)
  7. ^ Wizards of the Coast, 2008)
  8. ^ Cordell, Bruce R., Ed Greenwood and Chris Sims. Forgotten Realms Campaign Guide (Wizards of the Coast, 2008)
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Ed Greenwood, Dragon magazine #54 - "Down-to-earth divinity" (October 1981)
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h TSR, 1990)
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h
  13. ^ Martin, Julia, and Eric L. Boyd. Faiths & Avatars (TSR, 1996)
  14. ^ a b c d e f g Terra, John. Warriors and Priests of the Realms (TSR, 1996)
  15. ^ a b c d e f Greenwood, Ed and Stewart, Doug. Prayers from the Faithful (TSR, 1997)
  16. ^ McComb, Colin. On Hallowed Ground (TSR, 1996)
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i Boyd, Eric L. Demihuman Deities (TSR, 1998)
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h
  19. ^ a b c d e f g Boyd, Eric L, and Erik Mona. Faiths and Pantheons (Wizards of the Coast, 2002)
  20. ^ Ed Greenwood, Dragon magazine #54 - "Down-to-earth divinity" (October 1981), p. 52: "Azuth is merely a renamed Aarth."
  21. ^ a b c d e f g Martin, Julia, and Eric L Boyd. Faiths & Avatars (TSR, 1996)
  22. ^ a b c d McComb, Colin. On Hallowed Ground (TSR, 1996)
  23. ^ a b c d e f Perkins, Christopher. Warriors of Heaven (TSR, 1999)
  24. ^ Ed Greenwood, Dragon magazine #54 - "Down-to-earth divinity" (October 1981), p. 52: "Chauntea is a rewritten Demeter."
  25. ^
  26. ^ a b Martin, Julia, and Eric L Boyd. Faiths & Avatars (TSR, 1996)
  27. ^ Greenwood, Ed. "The Nine Hells Revisited." Dragon #91 (TSR, 1984)
  28. ^ Von Thorn, Alexander. "The Politics of Hell." Dragon #28 (TSR, 1979)
  29. ^ Boyd, Eric L. Powers & Pantheons (TSR, 1997)
  30. ^
  31. ^ Boyd, Eric L, and Erik Mona. Faiths and Pantheons (Wizards of the Coast, 2002).
  32. ^ a b
  33. ^ Lowder, James and Jean Rabe. Jungles of Chult (TSR, 1993) ISBN 978-0-88038-593-0
  34. ^
  35. ^ Ed Greenwood, Dragon magazine #54 - "Down-to-earth divinity" (October 1981), p. 52: "Gond is Hephaestus renamed."
  36. ^ Boyd, Eric L, and Erik Mona. Faiths and Pantheons Wizards of the Coast, 2002 ISBN 978-0-7869-2759-3.
  37. ^ Dungeons & Dragons Roleplaying Game Official Home Page - Story Archived April 5, 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  38. ^ Ed Greenwood, Dragon magazine #54 - "Down-to-earth divinity" (October 1981), p. 52: "[Ilmater] is the willing sufferer, similar to Issek of the Jug".
  39. ^ Greenwood, Ed. Ruins of Undermountain (TSR, 1991)
  40. ^ Baker, Richard, Ed Bonny and Travis Scott. Lost Empires of Faerûn (Wizards of the Coast, 2005)
  41. ^ Kate Novak & Jeff Grubb, Tymora's Luck (TSR, 1997)
  42. ^
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