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List of candidates in the United States presidential election, 2008

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List of candidates in the United States presidential election, 2008

The following are lists of candidates in the 2008 United States presidential election. Candidates who are not on any state ballots, withdrew from the race, suspended their presidential campaign, or failed to earn their party's nomination are listed separately.

Party nominees

All candidates in the table below were on the ballot in multiple states. Those who were on the ballot in enough states to win a majority in the U.S. Electoral College are marked in bold. Candidates who were on the ballot in no more than one state are listed in the next section.

Ron Paul was on the ballot in Louisiana with Barry Goldwater, Jr. on the Louisiana Taxpayers Party ticket[1] and in Montana with Michael Peroutka on the Constitution Party of Montana ticket, even though the latter is associated with the national Constitution Party.[2] Paul's supporters also qualified him to receive write-in votes in California. Paul was no longer actively running for president when he attained ballot status and asked to be removed. His request was denied by the Montana Secretary of State, because the request was sent to him too late.[3]
Presidential candidate/running mate Party Campaign site
Barack Obama/Joe Biden (campaign) Democratic, South Carolina United Citizens, New York Working Families[4] barackobama.com
John McCain/Sarah Palin (campaign) Republican, New York Independence, New York Conservative johnmccain.com
Ralph Nader/Matt Gonzalez (campaign) Independent, Independence-Ecology,[5] Peace and Freedom, Michigan Natural Law, Delaware Independent, Oregon Peace, New York Populist[4] votenader.org
Bob Barr/Wayne Allyn Root (campaign) Libertarian bobbarr2008.com
Cynthia McKinney/Rosa Clemente (campaign) Green votetruth08.com
Chuck Baldwin/Darrell Castle (campaign) Constitution, Kansas Reform, Virginia Independent Green baldwin2008.com
Alan Keyes/Brian Rohrbough (campaign) Independent, America's Independent alankeyes.com
Gloria La Riva/Eugene Puryear Socialism & Liberation votepsl.org
Brian Moore/Stewart Alexander Socialist, Vermont Liberty Union votesocialist2008.org
Róger Calero/Alyson Kennedy Socialist Workers themilitant.com
Charles Jay/Thomas L. Knapp Boston Tea CJ08.com
Thomas Stevens/Alden Link Objectivist objectivistparty.us
Gene Amondson/Leroy Pletten Prohibition geneamondson.com

Ballot access

The two major parties in the United States, the Democratic Party and the Republican Party, had ballot access in all 50 US states and the District of Columbia.

Each state sets its own requirements for candidates to gain ballot access. In some cases it is easier for party nominees to gain ballot access than for independent candidates, so Ralph Nader's independent campaign is associated with parties (pre-existing or newly formed) in some states: PF is the Peace and Freedom Party, NLP is the Natural Law Party, IEP is the Independent-Ecology Party, and IP is the Independent Party. In Kansas, Chuck Baldwin's campaign is associated with the Kansas Reform Party[6] after a legal challenge had been brought to recognize national Reform Party candidate Ted Weill on the ballot.[7]

Chris Bennett as his running mate.

Candidates who had ballot access to enough electoral votes to win the presidency
  Electoral Votes Nader Libertarian (Barr) Constitution (Baldwin) Green (McKinney)
States + D.C. 51 46 (50) 45 (47) 37 (49) 32 (49)
Electoral votes (EV) 538 456 (531) 503 (510) 318 (516) 368 (528)
Percent of EV 100% 84.8% (98.7%) 93.5% (94.8%) 59.1% (95.9%) 68.4% (98.1%)
Alabama[8] 9       (write-in)
Alaska[9] 3       (write-in)
Arizona[10] 10     (write-in)  
Arkansas[11] 6        
California[12] 55 PF   (write-in)  
Colorado[13] 9        
Connecticut[14] 7 IEP (write-in) (write-in)
Delaware[15] 3 IP      
Florida[16] 27 IEP      
[17] 15 (write-in)   (write-in) (write-in)
Hawaii[18] 4 IEP      
Idaho[19] 4       (write-in)
Illinois[20] 21        
Indiana[21] 11 (write-in)   (write-in) (write-in)
Iowa[22] 7 PF      
Kansas[23] 6       (write-in)
Kentucky[24] 8       (write-in)
Louisiana[25] 9      
Maine[26] 4   (write-in) (write-in)  
Maryland[27] 10 IEP      
Massachusetts[28] 12        
Michigan[29] 17 NLP      
Minnesota[30] 10        
Mississippi[31] 6        
Missouri[32] 11       (write-in)
Montana[33] 3     (write-in) (write-in)
Nebraska[34] 5        
Nevada[35] 5        
New Hampshire[36] 4     (write-in) (write-in)
New Jersey[37] 15        
New Mexico[38] 5 IEP      
New York[39] 31     (write-in)  
North Carolina[40] 15 (write-in)   (write-in)
North Dakota[41] 3       (write-in)
Ohio[42] 20        
Oklahoma[43] 7
Oregon[44] 7        
Pennsylvania[45] 21     (write-in) (write-in)
Rhode Island[46] 4        
South Carolina[47] 8        
South Dakota[48] 3      
Tennessee[49] 11        
Texas[50] 34 (write-in)   (write-in) (write-in)
Utah[51] 5        
Vermont[52] 3       (write-in)
Virginia[53] 13        
Washington[54] 11        
West Virginia[55] 5      
Wisconsin[56] 10        
Wyoming[57] 3       (write-in)
District of Columbia[58] 3   (write-in) (write-in)  
Other third party candidates

Notes:

  • Since Socialist Workers party candidate Róger Calero was constitutionally disqualified to be President, in some states the Socialist Workers Party had James Harris (JH) listed on the ballot.
  Electoral Votes Prohibition (Amondson) Socialist Workers (Calero) Boston Tea (Jay) America's Independent (Keyes) Socialism and Liberation (La Riva) Socialist (Moore) Objectivist (Stevens)
States + D.C. 51 3 10 (11) 3 (7) 3 (8) 12 8 (30) 2
EV 538 45 125 (180) 47 (75) 91 (168) 137 102 (338) 36
% of EV 100% 8.4% 23.2% (33.5%) 8.7% (13.9%) 16.9% (31.2%) 25.5% 19.7% (62.8%) 6.7%
Alabama 9 (write-in)
Alaska 3 (write-in)
Arizona 10 (write-in)
Arkansas 6  
California 55 (JH write-in)  
Colorado 9   JH          
Connecticut 7 (write-in)
Delaware 3   (write-in)
Florida 27   JH          
Georgia 15
Hawaii 4
Idaho 4 (write-in)
Illinois 21
Indiana 11 (write-in)
Iowa 7 JH    
Kansas 6 (write-in)
Kentucky 8 (write-in) (write-in)
Louisiana 9   JH  
Maine 4
Maryland 10 (write-in) (write-in) (write-in)
Massachusetts 12
Michigan 17 (write-in)
Minnesota 10   (write-in)
Mississippi 6
Missouri 11
Montana 3 (write-in)
Nebraska 5 (write-in)
Nevada 5
New Hampshire 4 (write-in)
New Jersey 15      
New Mexico 5
New York 31     (write-in)
North Carolina 15 (write-in)
North Dakota 3
Ohio 20 (write-in)  
Oklahoma 7
Oregon 7 (write-in)
Pennsylvania 21 (write-in)
Rhode Island 4   (write-in)
South Carolina 8
South Dakota 3
Tennessee 11    
Texas 34 (write-in) (write-in)
Utah 5 (write-in) (write-in)  
Vermont 3      
Virginia 13 (write-in)
Washington 11 JH   (write-in)
West Virginia 5
Wisconsin 10    
Wyoming 3 (write-in)
District of Columbia 3
Other candidates

The tickets below were on the ballot in no more than one state. Those appearing on a single state's ballot are in bold, all others are write-in candidates. Those without party labels are independents. Some do not have vice-presidential candidates.

  • Donald K. Allen/Christopher D. Borcik (Ohio, Maryland)
  • Jonathan Allen/Jeffrey Stath (Heartquake '08—Colorado, write-in in Arizona, Georgia, Montana, Ohio, and Texas)[59]
  • Jose M. Aparicio (Maryland)
  • Lawson Bone (Indiana, Maryland, and Utah)
  • Jeff Boss/Andrea Marie Psoras (Vote Here—New Jersey)
  • Ted Brown, Sr. (Maryland)
  • Santa Claus (West Virginia)[60]
  • James D. Criveau (Maryland)
  • Richard Duncan/Ricky Johnson (Ohio)
  • Michael Faith (Indiana)
  • James R. Germalic/Martin Wishnatsky (Ohio)
  • Mark Graham (Utah)
  • Leonard Habermehl (Kentucky)
  • RaeDeen R. Heupel (California, Maryland)
  • Thaddaus Hill/Gordon F. Bailey (Texas)
  • Ronald Hobbs (Maryland and Utah)
  • Yonyuth Hongsakaphadana (New Hampshire)
  • Keith Judd (Kentucky and Maryland)
  • Lou Kujawski (Indiana)
  • Bradford Lyttle/Abraham Bassford (United States Pacifist Party—Colorado)[61]
  • Frank McEnulty/David Mangan (Colorado)[62]
  • Frank Moore/Susan Block (California, Maryland, and Utah)
  • Kevin Mottus (Indiana)
  • Gary Nettles/Brad Krones (Florida)
  • John Joseph Polachek (New Party—Illinois)[63]
  • John Plemons (Indiana)
  • Platt Robertson/Scott Falls (Ohio)
  • Joe Schriner/Dale Way (Maryland and Ohio)
  • David John Sponheim (Maryland)
  • Lynne A. Starr (Maryland)
  • Blaine Taylor (Maryland)
  • Jeffrey Wamboldt (We the People Party—Wisconsin)
  • Lanakila Washington (Humanistic Party—New York)
  • Ted Weill/Frank McEnulty (Reform—Mississippi)
  • Jerry White/Bill Van Auken (Socialist Equality—New York)[64]
  • Cody Judy (Utah) Conservative Independent[65] Self-published sources,[66] State of Utah Declaration of Candidacy[67]

Guam

Although Guam has no votes in the Electoral College, it has held a straw poll for its presidential preferences since 1980. In 2008, their ballot included Barr, McCain, and Obama. On July 10, 2008, the Guam legislature passed a law moving that poll forward to gain notoriety for Guam's election.[68] The legislation was eventually vetoed.[69]

Primary and convention candidates

Democratic Party primary ballot access

  Candidate actively campaigning
  Candidate with suspended or canceled campaign
  Candidate not on ballot
Primary Biden Clinton Dodd Edwards Gravel Kucinich Obama Richardson
Iowa (January 3) JB HC CD JE MG DK BO BR
New Hampshire (January 8) JB HC CD JE MG DK BO BR
Michigan (January 15) HC CD MG DK
Nevada (January 19) JB HC CD JE DK BO BR
South Carolina (January 26) JB HC CD JE MG DK BO BR
Florida[70] (January 29) JB HC CD JE MG DK BO BR

Republican Party primary ballot access

and Republican Party comprehensive summary at[71]
  Candidate actively campaigning
  Candidate with suspended or canceled campaign
  Candidate not on ballot
  Giuliani Huckabee Hunter Keyes McCain Paul Romney Thompson
Iowa (January 3) RG MH DH JM RP MR FT
Wyoming (January 5) RG MH DH JM RP MR FT
New Hampshire[72] (January 8) RG MH DH AK JM RP MR FT
Michigan (January 15) RG MH DH JM RP MR FT
Nevada (January 19) RG MH DH JM RP MR FT
South Carolina (January 19) RG MH DH JM RP MR FT
Florida[70] (January 29) RG MH DH AK JM RP MR FT

See also

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^ a b
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^ Alabama ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  9. ^ Alaska ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27 Archived May 7, 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  10. ^ Arizona ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  11. ^ Arkansas ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  12. ^ California ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  13. ^ Colorado ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  14. ^ Connecticut ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  15. ^ Delaware ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  16. ^ Florida ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  17. ^ Georgia ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  18. ^ Hawaii ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27 Archived July 30, 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  19. ^ Idaho ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27 Archived July 30, 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  20. ^ Illinois ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  21. ^ Indiana ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  22. ^ Iowa ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  23. ^ Kansas ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  24. ^ Kentucky ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  25. ^ Louisiana ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  26. ^ Maine ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  27. ^ Maryland ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  28. ^ Massachusetts ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  29. ^ Michigan ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  30. ^ Minnesota ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  31. ^ Mississippi ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  32. ^ Missouri ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  33. ^ Montana ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27 Archived July 30, 2008 at the Wayback Machine
  34. ^ Nebraska ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  35. ^ Nevada ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  36. ^ New Hampshire ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  37. ^ New Jersey ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  38. ^ New Mexico ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  39. ^ New York ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  40. ^ North Carolina ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  41. ^ North Dakota ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  42. ^ Ohio ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  43. ^
  44. ^ Oregon ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  45. ^ Pennsylvania ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  46. ^ Rhode Island ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  47. ^ South Carolina ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  48. ^ South Dakota ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  49. ^ Tennessee ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  50. ^ Texas ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  51. ^ Utah ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  52. ^ Vermont ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  53. ^ Virginia ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  54. ^ Washington ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  55. ^ West Virginia ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  56. ^ Wisconsin ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  57. ^ Wyoming ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  58. ^ D.C. ballot information accessed: 2008-09-27
  59. ^
  60. ^ WSAZ News Channel 3 "W.Va. Write-In Candidates Include Santa Claus", September 25, 2008.
  61. ^
  62. ^ McEnulty is both the New American Independent Party presidential nominee, and also the Reform Party vice-presidential nominee, but is on the Colorado ballot as an independent. McEnulty's presidential campaign site
  63. ^ "No Illinois Challenges to Any Presidential Petition", Ballot Access News, June 30, 2008 (accessed September 17, 2008).
  64. ^ "Socialist Equality Party Takes Steps to Receive Votes for President", Ballot Access News, October 29, 2008 (accessed October 30, 2008).
  65. ^ Utah State Elections Office from official website for State of Utah elections
  66. ^ Cody Robert Judy for U.S. President 2008
  67. ^ 2008 Utah Elections
  68. ^
  69. ^
  70. ^ a b Florida presidential primary candidates' list released - Bay News 9
  71. ^
  72. ^

External links

  • Ballot Access News
  • Politics1 - Ballot Access
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