World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

List of blues genres

Article Id: WHEBN0000413631
Reproduction Date:

Title: List of blues genres  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Blues, Dallas Blues, R&B and Soul Music, Lead Belly, Music of Chicago
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

List of blues genres

Blues can be categorized into a number of genres. There are also genres of music that are not blues but which can be described as blues-like or bluesy. What may also be called blues is the actual chord structure of a piece, which goes through a standard chord progression, called the blues chord progression, containing the 3 basics chords: I, IV and V, which means the first, the fourth and the fifth degree.

Genres of blues

Blues-like genres

There are several genres that are typically urban in origin, simple in instrumentation and featuring plaintive, melancholy vocals that emphasize the singer's poor luck and unfortunate circumstances. Anthropologist Joaquim Reis de Brito described the phenomenon this way:

Thus, if we take together the Fado of Lisbon, the Tango of Buenos-Aires and the Rembetika of Athens, we will note firstly that all of them emerged a little before or after the middle of the 19th century in poor districts of the big port cities of the nascent industry, attracting people from the country or from abroad, and who were confined to a marginal existence. And if we look for other parallels in the development of these urban popular cultures, we will find them again: first, their obscure and repressed beginnings, then their discovery and appropriation by elements of the higher social classes, later their acceptance and admission by the establishment (often after their success outside of the native land) before ending as a subject of tourist exploring the caves".

Note that not all of the characteristics above are common to all the genres compared to blues, and not all are true of the blues itself.

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.