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List of Brick Renaissance buildings

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List of Brick Renaissance buildings

Brick Renaissance is the Northern European continuation of brick architecture after Brick Romanesque and Brick Gothic. Although the term Brick Gothic is often used generally for all of this architecture, especially in regard to the Hanseatic cities of the Baltic, the stylistic changes that led to the end of Gothic architecture did reach Northern Germany and northern Europe with delay, leading to the adoption of Renaissance elements into brick building. Nonetheless, it is very difficult for non-experts to distinguish transitional phases or early Brick Renaissance, as the style maintained many typical features of Brick Gothic, such as stepped gables. A clearer distinction only developed at the transition to Baroque architecture. In Lübeck, for example, Brick Renaissance is clearly recognisable in buildings equipped with terracotta reliefs by the artist Statius von Düren, who was also active at Schwerin (Schwerin Castle) and Wismar (Fürstenhof).

More clearly recognisable as Renaissance are brick buildings strongly influenced by the Dutch Renaissance style, such as Reinbek Castle at Reinbek near Hamburg, the Zeughaus at Lübeck, or Friedrichstadt in Schleswig-Holstein.

Contents

  • Belarus 1
  • Denmark 2
  • Germany 3
  • Italy 4
  • Lithuania 5
  • Poland 6
  • Sweden 7
  • References 8

Belarus

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Mir Mir Castle 15th-16th century Late 16th century additions to Gothic structure

Denmark

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Copenhagen Børsen 1619–1640 Dutch Renaissance style (architects Hans and Lorents van Steenwinckel) renaissance
Rosenborg Castle 1606–1624 Built in the Dutch Renaissance style by Architects Bertel Lange and Hans van Steenwinckel
Hillerød Frederiksborg Palace 1602–1620 Dutch Renaissance style (architects Hans and Lorents van Steenwinckel)

Germany

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Friedrichstadt Market Square early 17th century Plastered brick
Lübeck Mühlentor 1550s (model)
Schiffergesellschaft 1535–1538
Zeughaus 1594
Reinbek Castle 1572–1576

Italy

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Ferrara Castello Estense 1385–1450, early 16th century The castle essentially presents the appearance given to it by Girolamo da Carpi in the second half of the 16th century
Milan Castello Sforzesco 14th century, 1450

Lithuania

Town/city Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Vytėnai Panemunė Castle 1604–1610
Raudondvaris Raudondvaris Castle 16th century, 1615 Rebuilt 1653–1664
Siesikai Siesikai Castle c. 1517

Poland

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Brochów Fortified church 1551–1561, 1596 Gothic-renaissance church established by Jan Brochowski and his family as a three-nave church with three side towers
Bydgoszcz Church of the Assumption of Mary 1582–1645
Gdańsk Green Gate 1564–1568 Example of the Flemish mannerism in the city inspired by the Antwerp City Hall (architect Regnier van Amsterdam)[1]
Old Arsenal 1602–1605 Built in Dutch/Flemish mannerism by Anthonis van Obbergen, Jan Strakowski and Abraham van den Blocke[2]
Gołąb Church of St. Catherine and St. Florian 1628–1638 Polish mannerism style
Grocholin Fortified manor house 16th century Built for Wojciech Baranowski, is a rear example of defense housing architecture in northern Poland[3]
Piotrków Trybunalski Royal Castle 1512–1519 Gothic-renaissance
Płock Płock Cathedral Dome 1531–1534 Romanesque cathedral, rebuilt several times
Pułtusk Collegiate Church Pułtusk vault 1551–1556 Renaissance frescoes on the vault cover more than 1000 square meters in total[4] (brick church built between 1449 and the first half of the 16th century)
Sandomierz Town Hall 14th century Rebuilt in the renaissance style in the 16th century
Supraśl Orthodox Monastery
- Church of the Annunciation
1503–1511 Gothic-renaissance, destroyed in 1944 by retreating German army,[5] rebuilt since 1985
Tarnów Mikołajowski House 15th century Rebuilt in the renaissance style in 1524
Town Hall 14th century Rebuilt in the renaissance style in the 16th century
Zamość Zamość Fortress 1579–1618

Sweden

Place Building Main period of construction Special features Image
Kristianstad Holy Trinity Church (Swedish: Helga Trefaldighetskyrkan) 1617-1628 The city of Kristianstad was founded by king Christian IV of Denmark in 1614 at a time when Scania was part of the Kingdom of Denmark (until 1658).
Mariefred Gripsholm Castle 1537- Built on the site of a medieval castle, which is partly preserved in the current castle.
Stockholm Swedish House of Nobility (Swedish: Riddarhuset) 1641-1675 The building is more or less unchanged since its construction.
Trolle Ljungby Trolle Ljungby Castle 1620s-1630s The castle was mainly constructed when Scania was part of the Kingdom of Denmark (until 1658).

References

  1. ^
  2. ^
  3. ^
  4. ^
  5. ^ Gegen Ende des Krieges sprengt die deutsche Armee die Kirche auf ihrem Rückzug in die Luft.
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