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Kaoliang

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Title: Kaoliang  
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Subject: Taiwanese cuisine, Chinese alcoholic beverages, Maotai, Rice baijiu, Gouqi jiu
Collection: Baijiu, Chinese Alcoholic Beverages, Sorghum, Taiwanese Cuisine
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Kaoliang

Kaoliang
Traditional Chinese 高粱酒
Simplified Chinese 高粱酒
Literal meaning sorghum liquor

Kaoliang or sorghum wine is a strong distilled Taiwan and replicated in mainland China, and also popular in Korea, where it is called goryangju (hangul: 고량주; hanja: 高粱酒) or bbaegal (which is originated from Chinese character 白干).[1] Kaoliang is an important product of the islands Kinmen and Matsu which are part of Taiwan. Kaoliang ranges between 38 and 63 percent alcohol by volume.

Contents

  • Famous Taiwanese brands 1
  • In popular culture 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Famous Taiwanese brands

Kinmen 58% Kaoliang

Kinmen Kaoliang Liquor (Chinese: 金門高粱酒; pinyin: Jīnmén Gāoliáng Jiǔ) is one of the most popular brands of kaoliang in Taiwan. As its name indicates, it is produced on the island of Kinmen. The mainstays of the range are the standard 58 percent and 38 percent alcohol bottlings.

Yusan Kaoliang Chiew (Chinese: 玉山高粱酒; pinyin: Yùshān Gāoliáng Jiǔ) is produced by the Taiwan Tobacco and Liquor Corporation. It is named after the highest mountain in Taiwan, Yushan. One of the most notable products in the range is an "X.O." kaoliang aged for five years in tanks before bottling.

Tunnel 88 Kaoliang Liquor (Chinese: 八八坑道高粱酒; pinyin: Bā Bā Kēngdào Gāoliáng Jiǔ) is produced by the Matsu Distillery on the island of Nankan, part of the Matsu archipelago. The name is derived from the name of an abandoned military tunnel which the distillery took over as storage space for their kaoliang and aged rice wine. All of the distillery's aged kaoliangs are stored in the tunnel for at least five years.

In popular culture

See also

References

  1. ^ Korean Goryangju is produced in both North and South Korea, but Koreans also consume Chinese-produced and Taiwanese-produced kaoliang.
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