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Judaization

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Title: Judaization  
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Subject: Zionism, Judaization of Jerusalem, Islamization, Christianization, Yonatan Yosef
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Judaization

This article covers a form of cultural assimilation and spatial policy. For the Christian movements that believe in the necessity of adherence to Jewish laws, see Judaizers.

Judaization (Hebrew: לְגַיֵּיר, translit. legayer) is a process of cultural assimilation in which a person or a demographic group acquires Jewish cultural and religious beliefs and values.

Contents

  • Personal acculturation 1
  • Geopolitical acculturation 2
    • Haredization 2.1
  • See also 3
  • References 4

Personal acculturation

It is the obverse of "de-Judaization", the process observed, for example, in Soviet Russia, where discriminatory practices against Jews gave momentum to their "de-Judaization".[1]

Geopolitical acculturation

Haredization

Haredization refers to a late 20th- and early 21st-century phenomenon, in which urban and suburban areas of Israel, such as Beit Shemesh, become demographically and politically dominated by Haredim at the expense of non-Haredim (including religious Zionists and Hilonim). The trend is often the subject of protests in various Israeli cities.[2][3][4]

See also

References

  1. ^ Senator Ribicoff as early as 1963 protested against the "deprivation, discrimination, de-Judaization of Russia". See Yaacov Ro'i, The Struggle for Soviet Jewish Emigration, 1948-1967, Cambridge University Press, 2003 p.194
  2. ^ Egged removes political ads on 'haredization' of J'lem
  3. ^ Jerusalem seculars accuse Mayor of selling out to Haredim
  4. ^ A Saturday Stew II, by Bill Long, 12/13/08.
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