Healing the man with a withered hand

Healing the man with a withered hand is one of the miracles of Jesus in the Gospels, namely in Mark 3:1-6, Luke 6:6-11 and Matthew 12:9-13.[1][2][3][4]

On a Sabbath when Jesus went into the synagogue, the Pharisees and the teachers of the law were looking for a reason to accuse him, so they watched him closely to see if he would heal on the Sabbath and they asked him: "Is it lawful to heal on the Sabbath?" According to the Gospel of Matthew:

He said to them, "If any of you has a sheep and it falls into a pit on the Sabbath, will you not take hold of it and lift it out? How much more valuable is a man than a sheep! Therefore it is lawful to do good on the Sabbath." Then he said to the man, "Stretch out your hand." So he stretched it out and it was completely restored, just as sound as the other.

According to the Gospel of Mark, the Pharisees then went out and began to plot with the Herodians how they might kill Jesus.

This miracle is the subject of the spoken sermon portion of composer John Adams' "Christian Zeal and Activity".

See also

References

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