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Halfling deities

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Halfling deities

In many campaign settings for the Dungeons & Dragons fantasy role-playing game, the halfling pantheon of gods consists of the leader, Yondalla, as well as Arvoreen, Brandobaris, Cyrrollalee, Sheela Peryroyl, and Urogalan.

Arvoreen

Arvoreen
Game background
Title(s) The Defender, the Vigilant Guardian, the Wary Sword
Home plane Seven Mounting Heavens of Celestia
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Lawful Good
Portfolio Protection, vigilance, war
Domains Good, Law, Protection, War (also Halfling in Forgotten Realms)
Superior Yondalla
Design details

In many campaign settings for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game, Arvoreen is the halfling deity of protection, vigilance, and war. He is also known as "The Defender." Arvoreen lives in the halfling realm of the Green Fields on the plane of Mount Celestia.

Arvoreen was first detailed in Roger E. Moore's article "The Halfling Point of View," in Dragon #59 (TSR, 1982).[1] In Dragon #92 (December 1984), Gary Gygax indicated this as one of the deities legal for the Greyhawk setting.[2] He also appeared in the original Unearthed Arcana (1985).[3]

Arvoreen was detailed in the book Demihuman Deities (1998).[7] He is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[8]

Arvoreen's role in the Forgotten Realms is revisited in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[9] He was detailed again in Races of the Wild (2005).[10]

Brandobaris

Brandobaris
Game background
Title(s) Master of Stealth, Misadventure, the Trickster, the Irrepressible Scamp, the Friendly Rapscallion
Home plane Wanders
Power level Lesser
Alignment Neutral
Portfolio Stealth, thievery, adventuring
Domains Luck, Travel, Trickery (also Halfling in Forgotten Realms)
Superior Yondalla
Design details

Brandobaris (bran-doe-bair-iss) is the halfling deity of Stealth, Thievery, Rogues, and Adventuring. His sacred animal is the mouse. His symbol is a halfling's footprint. In Dungeons and Dragons lore, Brandobaris is said to have won a contest of speed and strength against the ogre and troll deity Vaprak, causing the ogres to cede their forested homeland of Luiren to halflings.[11]:149

Brandobaris was first detailed in Roger E. Moore's article "The Halfling Point of View," in Dragon #59 (TSR, 1982).[1] In Dragon #92 (December 1984), Gary Gygax indicated this as one of the deities legal for the Greyhawk setting.[2] He also appeared in the original Unearthed Arcana (1985).[3]

Brandobaris was detailed in the book Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[13] He was detailed again in Races of the Wild (2005).[10]

Cyrrollalee

Cyrrollalee
Game background
Title(s) The Hand of Fellowship, the Faithful, the Hearthkeeper
Home plane Seven Mounting Heavens of Celestia
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Lawful Good
Portfolio Friendship, trust, home
Domains Good, Law (also Family and Halfling in Forgotten Realms)
Superior Yondalla
Design details

Cyrrollalee is the halfling deity of friendship, trust, and the home. She lives in the halfling realm of the Green Fields on the plane of Mount Celestia. Cyrrollalee appears as a humble-looking halfling woman of homely appearance. She wears brown peasant's garb matching her hair. Her avatar carries two pairs of iron bands of Bilarro. Cyrrollalee lives in the halfling realm of the Green Fields on the plane of Mount Celestia.

Cyrrollalee was first detailed in Roger E. Moore's article "The Halfling Point of View," in Dragon #59 (TSR, 1982).[1] In Dragon #92 (December 1984), Gary Gygax indicated this as one of the deities legal for the Greyhawk setting.[2] She also appeared in the original Unearthed Arcana (1985).[3]

Cyrrollalee was detailed in the book Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[9] She was detailed again in Races of the Wild (2005).[10]

Sheela Peryroyl

Sheela Peryroyl
Game background
Title(s) Green Sister, the Wise, the Watchful Mother
Home plane Concordant Domain of the Outlands
Power level Intermediate
Alignment Neutral (Neutral Good tendencies)
Portfolio Nature, agriculture, weather
Domains Air, Charm, Plant (also Halfling in Forgotten Realms)
Superior Yondalla
Design details

Sheela Peryroyl is the halfling deity of nature, agriculture, and weather. Her realm of Flowering Hill can be found on the plane of the Outlands. Sheela is generally depicted as a pretty halfling maiden with brightly colored wildflowers woven in her hair. She is quiet, though her face is smiling and her eyes are dancing. She may also be depicted as laughing .Sheela's realm of Flowering Hill in the Outlands.

Sheela Peryroyl was first detailed in Roger E. Moore's article "The Halfling Point of View," in Dragon #59 (TSR, 1982).[1] In Dragon #92 (December 1984), Gary Gygax indicated this as one of the deities legal for the Greyhawk setting.[2] She also appeared in the original Unearthed Arcana (1985).[3]

Sheela Peryroyl was detailed in the book Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[9] She was detailed again in Races of the Wild (2005).[10]

Urogalan

Urogalan
Game background
Title(s) He Who Must Be, the Black Hound, Lord in the Earth, the Protector, the Shaper
Home plane Blessed Fields of Elysium
Power level Demigod
Alignment Neutral (LN tendencies)
Portfolio Earth, death
Domains Death, Earth, Law, Protection (also Halfling and Repose in Forgotten Realms)
Superior Yondalla
Design details

Urogalan is the halfling deity of earth and death. His symbol is the silhouette of a dog's head. He is a gentle deity for a god of death, respected and revered by his chosen race but never feared. He is seen as a protector of the dead. Urogalan is a slim, dusky-skinned halfling dressed in brown or pure white, representing his two primary aspects of earth and death. Urogalan's realm, Soulearth, is found on the plane of Elysium

Urogalan was first mentioned in Roger Moore's "The Gods of the Halflings" article in Dragon #59 (1982). He was first detailed in the release of Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[9] He was detailed again in Races of the Wild (2005).[10]

Yondalla

Yondalla
Game background
Title(s) The Protector and Provider, the Nurturing Matriarch, the Blessed One
Home plane Seven Mounting Heavens of Celestia
Power level Greater
Alignment Lawful Good
Portfolio Protection, fertility
Domains Family, Good, Halfling, Law, Protection
Design details

In the Dungeons & Dragons roleplaying game, Yondalla is the chief halfling goddess and a member of the game's 3rd edition "core pantheon". Her symbol is a shield with a cornucopia motif. Yondalla is the goddess of Protection, Fertility, the Halfling Race, Children, Security, Leadership, Diplomacy, Wisdom, the Cycle of Life, Creation, Family and Familial Love, Tradition, Community, Harmony, and Prosperity. Yondalla is represented as a strong female halfling with red-golden hair, looking determined and proud. She dresses in green, yellow, and brown, and carries a shield. Yondalla has two aspects that the halflings speak of in front of others: the Provider and the Protector. As the Provider, she is a goddess of fertility and growing things, of birth and youth. She can make barren things fertile and increase the growing rate of plants and animals to any speed she chooses.

Yondalla is the creator deity for the halfing race in Dungeons and Dragons lore, and different stories and exist throughout the source materials.[14] Dallah Thaun, the Lady of Mysteries, is a deity split from Yondalla according some lore.

Yondalla was created by [7] Yondalla is described as one of the good deities that celestials can serve in the supplement Warriors of Heaven (1999).[8]

Yondalla appears as one of the deities described in the Players Handbook for the 3.0 edition.[19] Yondalla is also detailed in Faiths and Pantheons (2002).[9] Yondalla appears in the revised Players Handbook for 3.5.[21] Her priesthood is detailed for this edition in Complete Divine (2004).[22] She again appears in Races of the Wild (2005).[23]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Moore, Roger E. "The Halfling Point of View." Dragon #59 (TSR, March 1982)
  2. ^ a b c d  
  3. ^ a b c d Gygax, Gary. Unearthed Arcana (TSR, 1985)
  4. ^ a b c d e Sargent, Carl. Monster Mythology (TSR, 1992)
  5. ^ a b c d Niles, Douglas. The Complete Book of Gnomes & Halflings. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1993
  6. ^ a b c d e McComb, Colin. On Hallowed Ground (TSR, 1996)
  7. ^ a b c d e Boyd, Eric L. Demihuman Deities (TSR, 1998)
  8. ^ a b c d Perkins, Christopher. Warriors of Heaven (TSR, 1999)
  9. ^ a b c d e Boyd, Eric L, and Erik Mona. Faiths and Pantheons (Wizards of the Coast, 2002).
  10. ^ a b c d e Williams, Skip. Races of the Wild, Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2005
  11. ^ Reid, Thomas. Shining South. Renton, WA: Wizards of the Coast, 2004
  12. ^ Boyd, Eric L. Demihuman Deities (TSR, 1998)
  13. ^ Boyd, Eric L., and Erik Mona. Faiths and Pantheons (Wizards of the Coast, 2002).
  14. ^ al.], design Skip Williams ; additional design Richard Baker ... [et al.] ; development team Andy Collins ... [et (2005). Races of the Wild (1. printing. ed.). Renton, Wash.: Groot-Bijgaarden. pp. 54–55.  
  15. ^ Ward, James and Robert Kuntz. Deities and Demigods (TSR, 1980)
  16. ^ Sargent, Carl. Monster Mythology (TSR, 1992)
  17. ^ McComb, Colin. On Hallowed Ground (TSR, 1996)
  18. ^ Niles, Douglas. The Complete Book of Gnomes and Halflings. Lake Geneva, WI: TSR, 1993
  19. ^ Tweet, Jonathan, Cook, Monte, Williams, Skip. Player's Handbook (Wizards of the Coast, 2000)
  20. ^ Redman, Rich, Skip Williams, and James Wyatt. Deities and Demigods (Wizards of the Coast, 2002)
  21. ^ Tweet, Jonathan, Cook, Monte, Williams, Skip. Player's Handbook (Wizards of the Coast, 2003)
  22. ^ Noonan, David. Complete Divine (Wizards of the Coast, 2004)
  23. ^ Williams, Skip. Races of the Wild (Wizards of the Coast, 2005)

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