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HMS Tempest (N86)

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HMS Tempest (N86)


HMS Tempest
Career (UK)
Name: HMS Tempest
Builder: Cammell Laird & Co Limited, Birkenhead
Laid down: 6 June 1940
Launched: 10 June 1941
Commissioned: 6 December 1941
Fate: sunk 13 February 1942
Badge:
100px
General characteristics
Class & type: British T class submarine
Displacement: 1,090 tons surfaced
1,575 tons submerged
Length: 275 ft (84 m)
Beam: 26 ft 6 in (8.08 m)
Draught: 16.3 ft (5.0 m)
Propulsion:

Two shafts
Twin diesel engines 2,500 hp (1.86 MW) each

Twin electric motors 1,450 hp (1.08 MW) each
Speed:

15.25 knots (28.7 km/h) surfaced

9 knots (20 km/h) submerged
Range: 4,500 nautical miles at 11 knots (8,330 km at 20 km/h) surfaced
Test depth: 300 ft (91 m) max
Complement: 61
Armament:

6 internal forward-facing torpedo tubes
2 external forward-facing torpedo tubes
3 external backward-facing torpedo tubes
6 reload torpedoes
4 inch (100 mm) deck gun

3 anti-aircraft machine guns

HMS Tempest (N86) was a T-class submarine of the Royal Navy. She was laid down by Cammell Laird & Co Limited, Birkenhead and launched in June 1941.

Career

Tempest had a short-lived career, serving in the Mediterranean.

She sailed from Malta on the night of 10 February to patrol the Gulf of Taranto. On the evening of the 11th Tempest was signalled that the Italians were aware of a submarine in her vicinity and that it should be assumed that her patrol had been compromised. On the 13th, Tempest was sighted on the surface by the Italian destroyer Circe. Tempest crash dived and Circe began depth charging the area, eventually resulting in oil being seen on the surface. Tempest's battery tanks had burst filling the boat with chlorine gas and was forced to surface, where she was hit by gunfire from the Circe. The crew abandoned the submarine, and 23 of the crew of 62 were picked up some 3hrs. later by the destroyer. The Italians attempted to board the abandoned vessel but were unable to, due to rough seas. Unable to board Tempest due to the bad weather, the Italian destroyer opened fire, scoring more than a dozen direct hits, but failing to sink the Tempest. Finally the Italians attempted to take the submarine in tow. Two members of the destroyer’s crew boarded the submarine and prepared the tow. As Circe manoeuvred to take up the tow, Tempest suddenly started to sink, forcing those on board to jump into the sea. HMS Tempest slipped beneath the waves stern-first, with the bows disappearing vertically.[1][2]

References

Coordinates: 39°15′0″N 17°45′0″E / 39.25000°N 17.75000°E / 39.25000; 17.75000

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