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Grants Pass, Oregon

Grants Pass, Oregon
City
City of Grants Pass, Oregon
Motto: Where the Rogue River Runs; It's the Climate!
Location in Oregon
Location in Oregon
Grants Pass, Oregon is located in USA
Grants Pass, Oregon
Grants Pass, Oregon
Location in USA
Coordinates:
Country United States
State Oregon
County Josephine
Incorporated 1887
Government
 • Mayor Darin Fowler
Area[1]
 • Total 11.03 sq mi (28.57 km2)
 • Land 10.87 sq mi (28.15 km2)
 • Water 0.16 sq mi (0.41 km2)
Elevation 960 ft (290 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 34,533
 • Estimate (2013)[3] 35,076
 • Density 3,176.9/sq mi (1,226.6/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 97526, 97527, 97528, 97543
Area code(s) 541 and 458
FIPS code 41-30550[4]
GNIS feature ID 1142947[5]
Website City of Grants Pass

Grants Pass is a city in, and the county seat of, Josephine County, Oregon, United States.[6] The city is located on Interstate 5, northwest of Medford. Attractions include the Rogue River, famous for its rafting, and the nearby Oregon Caves National Monument located 30 miles (48 km) south of the city. Grants Pass is 256 miles (412 km) south of Portland, the largest city in Oregon. The population was 34,533 at the 2010 census.[7]

Contents

  • History 1
  • Geography 2
    • Climate 2.1
  • Demographics 3
    • 2010 census 3.1
    • 2000 census 3.2
  • Economy 4
  • Arts and culture 5
    • Annual cultural events 5.1
    • Museums and other points of interest 5.2
  • Parks and recreation 6
  • Education 7
  • Media 8
    • Newspapers 8.1
    • Radio 8.2
  • Transportation 9
    • Road 9.1
    • Rail 9.2
    • Air 9.3
  • Notable people 10
    • National Football League (NFL) players 10.1
  • Sister city 11
  • See also 12
  • References 13
  • External links 14

History

Early Hudson's Bay Company hunters and trappers, following the Siskiyou Trail, passed through the site beginning in the 1820s. In the late 1840s, settlers (mostly American) following the Applegate Trail began traveling through the area on their way to the Willamette Valley. The city states[8] that the name was selected to honor General Ulysses S. Grant's success at Vicksburg. Grants Pass post office was established on March 22, 1865.[9] The city of Grants Pass was incorporated in 1887.[10]

The Oregon-Utah Sugar Company (financed by Charles W. Nibley) was created, leading to a sugar beet factory being built in Grants Pass in 1916.[11] Before the factory opened, Oregon-Utah Sugar was merged into the Utah-Idaho Sugar Company.[11] Due to labor shortages and low acreage planted in sugar beets, the processing machinery was moved to Toppenish, Washington in 1918 or 1919.[11]

Geography

Grants Pass is located in the Rogue Valley; the Rogue River runs through the city. U.S. Route 199 passes through the city, and joins Interstate 5.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 11.03 square miles (28.57 km2), of which, 10.87 square miles (28.15 km2) is land and 0.16 square miles (0.41 km2) is water.[1]

Climate

Welcome sign in Grants Pass

True to its motto, "It's the climate!",[12] Grants Pass has a Zone 7 climate.[13]

Summer days are sunny, dry and hot but it cools down dramatically at night; the average July high temperature is 90 °F (32 °C) and the low, 53 °F (12 °C). Winters are cool and fairly rainy with only occasional snow; the average January high temperature is 47.5 °F (8.5 °C) and the low, 32.5 °F (0 °C). It receives roughly 30 inches (760 mm) of precipitation per year, with three-quarters of it occurring between November 1 and March 31. The mild winters and dry summers support a native vegetation structure quite different from the rest of Oregon, dominated by madrone, deciduous and evergreen oak, manzanita, pine, chinquapin, and other species that are far less abundant further north.[14]

The record high temperature of 113 °F was on July 23, 1928. The record low temperature of -1 °F was on December 9, 1972[15] until 1990 when it reached -3 °F.[16] There are an average of 51.3 days annually with highs of 90 °F (32 °C) or higher and 77.5 days annually with lows of 32 °F (0 °C) or lower.

Measurable precipitation falls on an average of 110 days annually. The wettest year was 1996 with 55.64 inches (1,413 mm) of precipitation, and the driest year was 1976 with 15.35 inches (390 mm). The most precipitation in one month was 20.63 inches (524 mm) in December 1996. The heaviest rainfall in 24 hours was 5.27 inches (134 mm) on December 29, 1950. There is an average of only 4.6 inches (12 cm) of snow annually. The most snowfall in one month was 34.1 inches (87 cm) in February 1917.[17]

Climate data for Grants Pass, Oregon (1981–2010 normals)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 71
(22)
76
(24)
86
(30)
98
(37)
102
(39)
110
(43)
113
(45)
108
(42)
108
(42)
99
(37)
77
(25)
77
(25)
113
(45)
Average high °F (°C) 48.0
(8.9)
54.5
(12.5)
60.3
(15.7)
66.0
(18.9)
73.9
(23.3)
81.1
(27.3)
89.8
(32.1)
89.9
(32.2)
83.8
(28.8)
70.0
(21.1)
53.4
(11.9)
45.8
(7.7)
68.04
(20.03)
Daily mean °F (°C) 40.9
(4.9)
44.3
(6.8)
48.1
(8.9)
52.3
(11.3)
58.8
(14.9)
65.0
(18.3)
71.7
(22.1)
71.0
(21.7)
64.9
(18.3)
54.9
(12.7)
45.3
(7.4)
39.7
(4.3)
54.74
(12.63)
Average low °F (°C) 33.8
(1)
34.1
(1.2)
35.9
(2.2)
38.6
(3.7)
43.7
(6.5)
48.9
(9.4)
53.6
(12)
52.1
(11.2)
46.0
(7.8)
39.8
(4.3)
37.2
(2.9)
33.6
(0.9)
41.44
(5.26)
Record low °F (°C) 1
(−17)
5
(−15)
15
(−9)
20
(−7)
24
(−4)
30
(−1)
35
(2)
30
(−1)
24
(−4)
19
(−7)
12
(−11)
−3
(−19)
−3
(−19)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 4.84
(122.9)
3.96
(100.6)
3.37
(85.6)
2.11
(53.6)
1.40
(35.6)
0.68
(17.3)
0.32
(8.1)
0.31
(7.9)
0.60
(15.2)
1.92
(48.8)
5.01
(127.3)
6.41
(162.8)
30.95
(786.1)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 0.4
(1)
0.2
(0.5)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.3
(0.8)
1.0
(2.5)
Average precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 16.7 14.2 15.7 12.4 8.6 4.5 1.8 2.0 3.5 8.0 17.0 17.4 121.8
Average snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 0.3 0.3 0.1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 0.3 1.1
Source: NOAA [18]

Demographics

2010 census

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 34,533 people, 14,313 households, and 8,700 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,176.9 inhabitants per square mile (1,226.6/km2). There were 15,561 housing units at an average density of 1,431.6 per square mile (552.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.9% White, 0.5% African American, 1.2% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 2.3% from other races, and 3.7% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.5% of the population.

There were 14,313 households of which 30.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.3% were married couples living together, 14.5% had a female householder with no husband present, 4.9% had a male householder with no wife present, and 39.2% were non-families. 32.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.94.

The median age in the city was 39.3 years. 24.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.6% were from 25 to 44; 25% were from 45 to 64; and 18.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 47.3% male and 52.7% female.

2000 census

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 23,003 people, 9,376 households, and 5,925 families residing in the city. The population density was 3,033 per square mile (7,855/km2). There were 9,885 housing units at an average density of 1,303.3 per square mile (503.5/km²). By 2008, the city's population had increased to 33,239. According to U.S. Census figures from the 2006-2008 American Community Survey, the racial composition of the city's population was 93.6% white, 0.2% black, 1.6% American Indian, 1.1% Asian, 1.2% other race, and 2.3% two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos, who may be of any race, formed 7.2% of the city's population.

There were 9,376 households out of which 31.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.5% were married couples living together, 14.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.8% were non-families. 31.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.36 and the average family size was 2.94.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.0% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 25.7% from 25 to 44, 20.7% from 45 to 64, and 19.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 86.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 80.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $29,197, and the median income for a family was $36,284. Males had a median income of $31,128 versus $23,579 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,234. About 12.2% of families and 34.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.8% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.

Economy

Grants Pass is the birthplace of Dutch Bros. Coffee, which began with a single small pushcart on the corner of 6th and G Street, where the downtown stand is now located.[22] Brothers Travis and Dane Boersma started the franchise in 1992 and it quickly spread throughout the region.[22]

Arts and culture

Caveman statue next to the visitor center
Jetboat on the Rogue River at Grants Pass

Annual cultural events

Boatnik, a speedboat race and carnival event, is held every Memorial Day weekend in Riverside Park.[23]

Museums and other points of interest

The historic Rogue Theatre downtown has been transformed into a performing arts venue that hosts mostly local acts.[24] The Grants Pass Towne Center Association's "Back to the '50s" Celebration includes free concerts, a nearly 600-vehicle Classic Car Cruise, Poker Runs, and thematic shopping in the town's downtown historic district.[25]

Year round, there are First Friday Art Nights. On the first Friday of every month, many of the city's downtown stores hold art shows and promotional events.[26] This event has been associated with numerous fights between (usually teenaged) people in the downtown area. [27]

The Grants Pass post office contains two tempera murals done through the U.S. Treasury Department Section on Fine Arts (often mistakenly referred to as the "WPA"), both painted in 1938. There are ten government-sponsored New Deal era murals in Oregon; Grants Pass is the only post office that contains two. The murals are "Rogue River Indians" by Louis DeMott Bunce (who also did a 1959 mural at Portland International Airport) and "Early and Contemporary Industries" by Eric Lamade.[28]

Parks and recreation

Grants Pass has numerous and diverse parks and green spaces.[29] Notable city-run parks include Riverside Park, summer home to the local Concerts in the Park series, and the Reinhart Volunteer Park, a park largely built through the efforts of community volunteers and featuring facilities for many sports.[30][31]

Education

Grants Pass area public schools are served by Grants Pass School District, including Grants Pass High School, and Three Rivers School District, including Illinois Valley High School, North Valley High School, and Hidden Valley High School. Rogue Community College's (RCC) main (Redwood Campus) is located south of Grants Pass on Redwood Highway with additional campuses located in Medford, Oregon (Riverside Campus) and White City (Table Rock Campus).[32]

Media

Newspapers

The Grants Pass Daily Courier is the region's newspaper.

Radio

AM

  • KAGI 930 JPR News and Information
  • KAJO 1270 News/Talk

FM (Medford and Ashland stations listed by Grants Pass translator frequencies)

  • KDOV 88.1 Religious
  • KAPK 91.1 AFR - Religious
  • KTMT-FM 92.1 Top 40
  • KIFS 92.9 Top 40
  • KRRM 94.7 Traditional Country
  • KBOY-FM 96.1 Classic Rock
  • KROG 96.9 The Rogue - Modern Rock
  • KLDR 98.3 Top 40
  • KRWQ 98.7 Country
  • KCMD 99.3 Classic Hits
  • KLDZ 100.7 Classic Hits
  • KSOR 101.5 JPR Classical
  • KCNA 102.7 The Drive - Classic Hits
  • KAWZ 103.1 CSN - Religious
  • KAKT 104.7 Country
  • KYVL 105.9 Active Rock
  • KCMX-FM 107.1 Soft Adult Contemporary
  • KJCR-LP 107.9

Transportation

Road

Rail

Air

Notable people

National Football League (NFL) players

Sister city

See also

References

  1. ^ a b
  2. ^ a b
  3. ^ a b
  4. ^ a b
  5. ^
  6. ^
  7. ^
  8. ^ http://www.grantspassoregon.gov/Index.aspx?page=704
  9. ^ http://www.visitgrantspass.org/Index.aspx?page=320
  10. ^ http://www.grantspassoregon.gov/Index.aspx?page=392
  11. ^ a b c
  12. ^ http://www.visitgrantspass.org/Index.aspx?page=319
  13. ^ http://oregonstate.edu/dept/ldplants/sunsetzn.htm
  14. ^ http://www.worldclimate.com/cgi-bin/data.pl?ref=N42W123+2200+353445C
  15. ^ http://www.weather.com/weather/wxclimatology/monthly/graph/97526
  16. ^ http://www.grantspassoregon.gov/Index.aspx?page=642
  17. ^ http://www.wrcc.dri.edu/cgi-bin/cliMAIN.pl?or3445
  18. ^
  19. ^
  20. ^ Moffatt, Riley. Population History of Western U.S. Cities & Towns, 1850-1990. Lanham: Scarecrow, 1996, 210.
  21. ^
  22. ^ a b http://www.dutchbros.com
  23. ^ Boatnik
  24. ^ Rogue Theatre
  25. ^ Grants Pass Towne Center Association - Association of Grants Pass Merchants and Businesses Supporting Grants Pass Oregon Business, Businesses and Community
  26. ^ First Friday Art Night Grants Pass Oregon Art Walk with Regional Southern Oregon Artists
  27. ^ First Friday riot in Grants Pass - YouTube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lm4YQHyrhLM
  28. ^ http://www.wpamurals.com/GrantsPs.htm
  29. ^
  30. ^
  31. ^
  32. ^ Rogue Community College
  33. ^
  34. ^
  35. ^
  36. ^
  37. ^ 'Former State Assemblyman Of 2nd District Dies,' Sheboygan Press, September 22, 1925, pg. 4

External links

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