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Frequency band

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Title: Frequency band  
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Subject: Frequency-division multiple access, Sub-band coding, TV radio, Polarization division multiple access, Universal remote control duplicator
Collection: Signal Processing, Telecommunication Theory
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Frequency band

A frequency band is an interval in the frequency domain, delimited by a lower frequency and an upper frequency.

Frequency ranges

The frequency range of a system is the range over which it is considered to provide a useful level of signal with acceptable distortion characteristics. A listing of the upper and lower limits of frequency limits for a system is not useful without a criterion for what the range represents.

Many systems are characterized by the range of frequencies to which they respond. Musical instruments produce different ranges of notes within the hearing range. The electromagnetic spectrum can be divided into many different ranges such as visible light, infrared or ultraviolet radiation, radio waves, X-rays and so on, and each of these ranges can in turn be divided into smaller ranges. A radio communications signal must occupy a range of frequencies carrying most of its energy, called its bandwidth. A frequency band may represent one communication channel or be subdivided into many. Allocation of radio frequency ranges to different uses is a major function of radio spectrum allocation.

See also

References

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