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Five-spice powder

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Title: Five-spice powder  
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Subject: Cantonese cuisine, Sichuan pepper, Spice, Chinese Indonesian cuisine, Chenpi
Collection: Cantonese Cuisine, Hawaiian Cuisine, Herb and Spice Mixtures
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Five-spice powder

Five-spice powder
Chinese 五香粉
Hanyu Pinyin wǔxiāngfěn
Cantonese Jyutping ng5 hoeng1 fan2

Five-spice powder is a spice mixture of five spices, used primarily in Chinese cuisine but also used in other Asian and Arabic cookery.It is very common in India, being used in north Indian and South Indian cookery extensively.[1]

Contents

  • Formula 1
  • Usage 2
  • References 3
  • See also 4

Formula

While there are many variants, a common mix is:[2]

Other recipes may contain anise seed or ginger root, nutmeg, turmeric, Amomum villosum pods (砂仁), Amomum cardamomum pods (白豆蔻), licorice, Mandarin orange peel or galangal. In South China Cinnamomum loureiroi and Mandarin orange peel is commonly used as a substitute for Cinnamomum cassia and cloves, respectively, producing a different flavour for southern five-spice powders.

Usage

Five spice may be used with fatty meats such as pork, duck or goose. It is used as a spice rub for chicken, duck, pork and seafood, in red cooking recipes, or added to the breading for fried foods.[2] Five spice is used in recipes for Cantonese roasted duck, as well as beef stew. It is used as a marinade for Vietnamese broiled chicken. The five-spice powder mixture has followed the Chinese diaspora and has been incorporated into other national cuisines throughout Asia.

Although this mixture is used in restaurant cooking, many Chinese households do not use it in day-to-day cooking. In Hawaii, some restaurants place a shaker of the spice on each patron's table. A seasoned salt can be easily made by dry-roasting common salt with five-spice powder under low heat in a dry pan until the spice and salt are well mixed.

Five-spice powder

References

  1. ^
  2. ^ a b Chinese Five Spice at The Epicentre

See also

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