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Fiber media converter

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Title: Fiber media converter  
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Fiber media converter

A fiber media converter is a simple networking device that makes it possible to connect two dissimilar media types such as twisted pair with fiber optic cabling. They were introduced to the industry nearly two decades ago, and are important in interconnecting fiber optic cabling-based systems with existing copper-based, structured cabling systems. They are also used in metropolitan area network (MAN) access and data transport services to enterprise customers.

Media conversion types

Fiber media converters support many different data communication protocols including Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, T1/E1/J1, DS3/E3, as well as multiple cabling types such as coax, twisted pair, multi-mode and single-mode fiber optics. Media converter types range from small standalone devices and PC card converters to high port-density chassis systems that offer many advanced features for network management.

On some devices, Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) enables proactive management of link status, monitoring chassis environmental statistics and sending traps to network managers in the event of a fiber break or even link loss on the copper port.

Fiber media converters can connect different local area network (LAN) media, modifying duplex and speed settings. Switching media converters can connect legacy 10BASE-T network segments to more recent 100BASE-TX or 100BASE-FX Fast Ethernet infrastructure. For example, existing half-duplex hubs can be connected to 100BASE-TX Fast Ethernet network segments over 100BASE-FX fiber.

When expanding the reach of the LAN to span multiple locations, media converters are useful in connecting multiple LANs to form one large campus area network that spans over a limited geographic area. As premises networks are primarily copper-based, media converters can extend the reach of the LAN over single-mode fiber up to 160 kilometers with 1550 nm optics.

Wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) technology in the LAN is especially beneficial in situations where fiber is in limited supply or expensive to provision. As well as conventional dual strand fiber converters, with separate receive and transmit ports, there are also single strand fiber converters, which can extend full-duplex data transmission up to 120 kilometers over one optical fiber.

Other benefits of media conversion include providing a gradual migration path from copper to fiber. Fiber connections can reduce electromagnetic interference.

Also fiber media converters pose as a cheap solution for those who want to buy switches for use with fiber but do not have the funds to afford them, they can buy ordinary switches and use fiber media converters to use with their fiber network.

See also

References

  • Spurgeon, Charles E., Ethernet: The Definitive Guide, Sebastopol, CA: O'Reilly & Associates, 2000
  • Residential Network Cabling, New York, NY: R.R. Donnelley & Sons Company, 2002
  • The Switching Book, Xylan: An Alcatel Company, 1999
  • "Fiber optic media converter". Fiber optical networking.. July 31, 2012.
  • "Gigabit Ethernet Fibre Media converters". Optcore, April 6, 2013
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