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Fairchild 42

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Fairchild 42

Model 41 and Model 42 Foursome
Role Utility aircraft
Manufacturer Fairchild
Designer John Lee
First flight 19 November 1927
Number built 8

The Fairchild Model 41 Foursome was a light aircraft developed in the United States in the late 1920s and produced as the Model 42 Foursome. It was a conventional high-wing, strut-braced monoplane with fixed tailwheel undercarriage. The pilot and three passengers were seated within a fully enclosed cabin, and the aircraft generally resembled a scaled-down version of Fairchild's successful FC-2 design. Two prototypes were built as the Model 41 and Model 41A leading to the Model 42 production version which was built in a small series. This production version differed from the prototypes in having a redesigned, strut-braced empennage in place of the wire-braced unit of the earlier aircraft, and a more powerful version of the Wright Whirlwind powerplant.

Variants

Model 41 Foursome
First prototype four seat cabin monoplane, powered by a 220 hp (160 kW) Wright J-5, one built
Model 41A Foursome
Second prototype four seat cabin monoplane, powered by a 300 hp (220 kW) Wright J-5, one built.
Model 42 Foursome
Production four seat cabin monoplane, powered by 330 hp (250 kW) Wright J-6 engines, six built and two converted from the 41 and 41A.

Survivors

NC106M has been rebuilt to airwothy standard in Alaska as of July 2008, powered by a Pratt & Whitney R-985 Wasp Junior and converted to seat 7 passengers, with rear round windows added. [1]


Specifications (Model 42)

General characteristics

  • Crew: One pilot
  • Capacity: 3 passengers
  • Length: 30 ft 6 in (9.30 m)
  • Wingspan: 45 ft 6 in (13.86 m)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Wright J-6, 330 hp (246 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 130 mph (210 km/h)
  • Range: 700 miles (1,130 km)

References

  • aerofiles.com
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